Back to Top Skip to main content

World AIDS Day puts spotlight on landmark DoD study

Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center, discusses HIV vaccine progress at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Nov. 26, during a World AIDS Day commemoration.  (U.S. Army photo) Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center, discusses HIV vaccine progress at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, Nov. 26, during a World AIDS Day commemoration. (U.S. Army photo)

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Research and Innovation | Global Health Engagement

The Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR) hosted a World AIDS Day event Tuesday, Nov. 26, highlighting advances in DoD-led HIV research and celebrating the 10th anniversary of the Army-led RV144 HIV vaccine study.

WRAIR’s Military HIV Research Program or MHRP headed the RV144 study, the first-ever – and only to-date – clinical trial to demonstrate that an HIV vaccine regimen was safe and modestly effective in preventing HIV infection. The study sought to determine what methods could be used to lower risk of contracting the disease.

The RV144 trial represented a massive undertaking for the Army and serves as a model of international and interagency collaboration. It involved more than 16,000 adult volunteers and a large network of partners who still work with WRAIR today, including the Thai Ministry of Public Health; the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases – part of the National Institutes of Health; and Sanofi Pasteur.

In 2009, the Army announced that the study’s investigational prime-boost vaccine regimen lowered the rate of HIV infection by 31.2 percent. These results, although modest, gave the global community hope that a vaccine to prevent HIV infection is possible at a time when such an achievement seemed elusive.

“RV144 was the light at the time in the field, without which we may have given up,” said Dr. John Mascola, director of the National Institutes of Health Vaccine Research Center and the featured speaker at WRAIR’s World AIDS Day event. “In the last 10 years of HIV vaccine progress, RV144 is the anchor.”

The landmark trial continues to provide scientific direction to help guide vaccine development and testing. RV144 and its follow-on trials allowed researchers to discover of risk factors, provide targets for optimizing vaccine boosting, and form a foundation for three HIV vaccine candidates currently undergoing efficacy testing. A video featuring many prominent HIV researchers who were involved with RV144 was shown at the World AIDS Day event.

Also at the event, Lt. Gen (Ret.) Eric B. Schoomaker, 42nd surgeon general of the United States Army and former commanding general of the United States Army Medical Command, highlighted the military’s earliest contributions to HIV research, which include the development of a disease staging system and promoting the finding that HIV can be transmitted heterosexually. The military’s HIV research efforts were consolidated in 1986 with the establishment of MHRP.

MHRP’s initial mission was to advance an HIV vaccine to protect service members and the global community from HIV, but has since expanded beyond vaccine development to include cure research and prevention and treatment services in Africa under the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief or PEPFAR. Via PEPFAR initiatives, WRAIR provides life-saving antiretroviral therapy to more than 350,000 people living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa, which contributes to global health security.

WRAIR supports PEPFAR activities within military and civilian communities in four countries where it conducts research (Nigeria, Tanzania, Uganda, and Kenya), which strengthens community trust and provides an ethical framework for clinical studies. The Department of Defense HIV/AIDS Prevention Program, led by the U.S. Navy, is responsible for assisting foreign military partners with the development and implementation of military-specific HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment programs in more than 55 countries around the globe, also supported by PEPFAR.

“Those countries that partner with us on PEPFAR have a 40-percent decrease in violence and a 40-increase in political stability,” said WRAIR Commander Army Col. Deydre Teyhen. “So we say that soldier health is world health. But in fighting HIV/AIDS, WRAIR researchers are also working to advance world peace.”

More information can be found on the RV144 HIV Trial web page.

You also may be interested in...

USNS Mercy returns home following Pacific Partnership 2018

Article
7/24/2018
Navy Hospital Corpsman Tianna Garcia, assigned to Naval Medical Center San Diego, is greeted by her husband Aaron Garcia during the homecoming ceremony for the hospital ship USNS Mercy. The ship and her crew completed a five-month humanitarian relief mission to Southeast Asia. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Indra Beaufort)

Pacific Partnership 2018 included more than 800 military and civilian personnel from the U.S., Australia, Canada, France, Japan, Singapore, South Korea and the United Kingdom

Recommended Content:

Civil Military Medicine | Civil Support | Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

U.S. Navy, JMSDF participate in bilateral training exercise

Article
6/21/2018
Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) Sailors and U.S. Naval Hospital (USNH) Yokosuka personnel transport a simulated patient during a mass casualty drill in conjunction with hospital ship USNS Mercy and JMSDF personnel. The drill was conducted in order to prepare medical staff for a mass casualty scenario involving a maritime incident at sea. USNH Yokosuka is the largest U.S. military treatment facility on mainland Japan caring for approximately 43,000 eligible beneficiaries. (U.S. Navy photo by Tim Jensen)

The simulated disaster for the training exercise included a Japanese vessel colliding with a U.S. vessel

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief

Military doctors conduct infectious diseases training in Panama

Article
6/13/2018
Publio Gonzalez, a biologist with the Gorgas Institute, holds a bat in Meteti, Panama. Gonzalez and U.S. military doctors were participating in infectious diseases training, in which they received informational lectures from Panamanian infectious disease experts and field studies of possible virus-carrying wildlife and insects. The event took place during Exercise New Horizons 2018, which is a joint training exercise where U.S. military members conduct training in civil engineer, medical and support services while benefiting the local community. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

Due to the geographic location of Panama, the importance the country places on controlling diseases greatly benefits the Unites States

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Project Sea Raven delivers cutting-edge pathogen detection technology

Article
5/31/2018
U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James Bowes, senior preventive-medicine technician, places mosquitoes on a dish to view under a microscope. Project Sea Raven’s capabilities are not limited to just insects – it can test anything from blood to soil and water. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Tom Ouellette)

Project Sea Raven is now an integral part of USNS Mercy’s microbiology capacity

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Air Force medical team supports exercise in Panama

Article
5/29/2018
Air Force Master Sgt. Emeriles Curry, 346th Expeditionary Medical Operations Squadron dental hygienist, provides dental care to a local man in the Coclé Province of Panama. To date, in 2-weeks’ worth of Medical Readiness Training Exercises, the teams working in conjunction with the Panamanian Ministry of Health, have seen nearly 4,700 patients. The medical team is participating in Exercise New Horizons 2018, which is a joint training exercise focused on medical, civil engineer and support service personnel’s ability to prepare, deploy, operate, and redeploy outside the United States. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

The medical team has been working closely with Panamanian dentists

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

USNS Mercy arrives in Vietnam for Pacific Partnership

Article
5/23/2018
The hospital ship USNS Mercy anchors in shallow water during a Pacific Partnership stop. (PP18). PP18’s mission is to work collectively with host and partner nations to enhance regional interoperability and disaster response capabilities, increase stability and security in the region, and foster new and enduring friendships across the Indo-Pacific Region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Cameron Pinske)

Pacific Partnership is the largest annual multilateral HA/DR preparedness mission conducted in the Indo-Pacific

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Airmen contribute to saving a life during New Horizons 2018

Article
5/17/2018
From left to right: U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Ariel Thomas, 346th Air Expeditionary Group medical technician, Master Sgt. Reina Blake, 346 AEG Office of the Legal Advisor superintendent, and Special Agent Alexandra Garced, Air Force Office of Special Investigations agent, stand for a group photo in Meteti, Panama. Blake, Thomas and Garced are credited with saving the life of a local Panamanian woman after she jumped from a bridge. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

Airmen go above and beyond to save a local woman

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

New Horizons embedded health engagement provides unparalleled training

Article
5/15/2018
Air Force Capt. (Dr.) Charles Hutchings, 346th Expeditionary Medical Operations Squadron pediatrician, explains information to a local woman near Meteti, Panama, April 17, 2018. Hutchings was part of an embedded health engagement team participating in Exercise New Horizons 2018, which will assist communities throughout Panama by providing medical assistance and building facilities such as schools, a youth community center and a women’s health ward. (Air Force photo by Senior Airman Dustin Mullen)

For medical professionals participating in Exercise New Horizons 2018, hands-on training comes in the form of fully submerging into local clinics

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Multinational surgeons participate in first robot-assisted surgery onboard USNS Mercy

Article
5/7/2018
Surgical staff assigned to Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Mercy for Pacific Partnership 2018 and the Sri Lankan surgical team from Base Hospital Mutur connect the probes of the Da Vinci XI Robot Surgical System to a patient during the first robot-assisted surgery while aboard the Mercy. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kelsey L. Adams)

A joint team of multinational surgeons successfully completed a gall bladder removal, using a Da Vinci XI Robot Surgical System

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Navy audiologist contributes to Pacific Partnership

Article
4/17/2018
Navy Lt. Matt Thomas, an audiologist supporting Pacific Partnership 2018, examines a patient's ear during a community health fair at Yap Memorial Hospital in Micronesia. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Byron Linder)

One participant can claim to have the most firsthand experience with the Micronesian islands

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

In it together: Fighting global health threats takes partnerships

Article
4/12/2018
Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery spoke at the 2018 Medical Support Operations Conference in London, delivering remarks on the defense sector's role in advancing the Global Health Security Agenda. A partnership of more than 60 nations, the Global Health Security Agenda, or GHSA, brings together the unique roles of governments, industry, NGOs, academia, and international institutions to combat infectious disease threats. “We are up against a perilous rise in infectious disease outbreaks threatening the health and safety of our citizens, as well as threatening geopolitical stability,” stated McCaffery, emphasizing that global health security is an essential part of our national security. “The bottom line is that defense and security sectors have a real opportunity to use the GHSA framework to increase collaboration and converge our unique assets across all sectors to detect and defeat disease at the earliest possible moment," McCaffery said.

McCaffery discusses importance of Global Health Security Agenda in U.K.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

2018 Visit to U.S. Africa Command's Command Surgeon

Photo
4/11/2018
Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery visits U.S. Africa Command's Command Surgeon and team to discuss the strategic context of global health in advancing shared security objectives with partner nations across the region.  The Department of Defense recognizes that Global Health Engagement activities play a key role to advance U.S. troop operational readiness, build interoperability, and enhance Security Cooperation.

Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery visits U.S. Africa Command's Command Surgeon and team to discuss the strategic context of global health in advancing shared security objectives with partner nations across the region. The Department of Defense recognizes that Global Health Engagement activities play a key role to advance U.S. troop operational readiness, build interoperability, and enhance Security Cooperation.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

2018 Medical Support Operations Conference

Photo
4/11/2018
Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery spoke at the 2018 Medical Support Operations Conference in London, delivering remarks on the defense sector's role in advancing the Global Health Security Agenda. A partnership of more than 60 nations, the Global Health Security Agenda, or GHSA, brings together the unique roles of governments, industry, NGOs, academia, and international institutions to combat infectious disease threats. “We are up against a perilous rise in infectious disease outbreaks threatening the health and safety of our citizens, as well as threatening geopolitical stability,” stated McCaffery, emphasizing that global health security is an essential part of our national security. “The bottom line is that defense and security sectors have a real opportunity to use the GHSA framework to increase collaboration and converge our unique assets across all sectors to detect and defeat disease at the earliest possible moment," McCaffery said.

Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery spoke at the 2018 Medical Support Operations Conference in London, delivering remarks on the defense sector's role in advancing the Global Health Security Agenda. A partnership of more than 60 nations, the Global Health Security Agenda, or GHSA, brings together the unique roles of governments, industry, NGOs, academia, and international institutions to combat infectious disease threats. “We are up against a perilous rise in infectious disease outbreaks threatening the health and safety of our citizens, as well as threatening geopolitical stability,” stated McCaffery, emphasizing that global health security is an essential part of our national security. “The bottom line is that defense and security sectors have a real opportunity to use the GHSA framework to increase collaboration and converge our unique assets across all sectors to detect and defeat disease at the earliest possible moment," McCaffery said.

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement

Advice for healthy older adults: Get the new shingles vaccine

Article
3/29/2018
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Luis Echevarria draws up the new vaccine for shingles at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, Florida.  Shingrix is recommended for healthy adults 50 and older even if they’ve already had shingles or received the previous shingles vaccine. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Jacob Sippel)

Rash can recur, cause long-term pain

Recommended Content:

Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Immunization Healthcare

Preventive medicine saving lives

Article
3/28/2018
Navy Lt. Marcus McDonough and Navy Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Adrian Weldon, assigned to Navy Environmental and Preventative Medicine Unit TWO, prepare a BG-Sentinel mosquito trap outside the Franklin D. Roosevelt School during Continuing Promise 2018.(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Brianna K. Green)

Public health is an essential part of daily life

Recommended Content:

Global Health Engagement
<< < ... 6 7 8 9 10  ... > >> 
Showing results 76 - 90 Page 6 of 17

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.