Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

U.S. Transportation Command: DoD’s manager for global patient movement

An ambulance bus backs up to the Mississippi Air National Guard C-17 Globemaster III as Airmen prepare to unload patients at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland. The bus transports the ill and/or injured to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. JBA and Travis Air Force Base, California, serve as the primary military entry points or hubs for patient distribution within the continental United States. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis) An ambulance bus backs up to the Mississippi Air National Guard C-17 Globemaster III as Airmen prepare to unload patients at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland. The bus transports the ill and/or injured to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland. JBA and Travis Air Force Base, California, serve as the primary military entry points or hubs for patient distribution within the continental United States. (U.S. Air Force photo by Karina Luis)

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Hospitals and Clinics

SCOTT AIR FORCE BASE, Ill. – U.S. military C-17 Globemaster III aircraft often arrive at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, and Travis Air Force Base, California, from foreign locales, transporting cargo, but also at times, ill or injured service members returning stateside for continuing medical treatment.

As the Department of Defense’s single manager for global patient movement, U.S. Transportation Command conducts this lifesaving mission via the U.S. Air Force’s aeromedical evacuation system, which provides in-transit health care for America’s wounded warriors from the point of injury or illness to medical facilities with the level of care needed to properly treat their medical conditions.

From JBA and Travis Air Force Base, some patients, dependent on medical condition and/or service-directed requirements, are subsequently transported to other locations within the continental United States to reach the best facility for their particular circumstances.

“On a weekly basis, USTRANSCOM moves up to 40 patients from overseas to CONUS, with a broad set of final medical destinations,” said U.S. Air Force Col. John Andrus, command surgeon, USTRANSCOM. “Just like in our overseas theaters of operation, the weekly movement of DoD patients across the United States involves the USTRANSCOM Patient Movement Requirements Center–Americas, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, validating the patient(s) and the 618th Air Operations Center (Tanker Airlift Control Center) also at Scott, coordinating the aircraft from JBA or Travis AFB to the final medical treatment destination. When military aircraft are not available, contract air ambulances are used.”

Using a hub [Joint Base Andrews/Travis Air Force Base] and spoke [final definitive care destination(s)] system, the CONUS patient distribution process can manage current workload. Contingency planning and patient movement exercises continue to refine and advance the interagency effort that would be required to accommodate a larger number of ill and injured servicemembers coming back from a large-scale conflict or contingency.

When needed, military, Veterans Affairs’, and National Disaster Medical System hospital beds across the nation are identified through a collaboration between the Departments of Health and Human Services and Homeland Security, as well as the DoD and VA. Patients are assigned and moved to those beds through a hub and spoke transportation system. For example, the Army, Air Force, Navy, and the  VA operate over 60 Federal Coordinating Centers, which serve as patient reception hubs and spokes throughout America. This system gives returning wounded warriors access to military, VA, and NDMS beds, as required.

“Established in 1984 and managed by HHS, the NDMS demonstrates a whole-of-government approach in receiving – and treating – large numbers of patients. For instance, during a contingency, such as a hurricane or earthquake, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, which is the lead federal agency, would identify DOD and VA FCCs to support the contingency,” stated U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Liza Soza, U.S. Public Health Service, HHS’ liaison officer, USTRANSCOM’s Command Surgeon Directorate. “Whether in a defense support of civil authorities’ situation or conflict, FCCs serve as a critical component in the CONUS patient distribution system, enabling a coordinated and comprehensive response that enhances our wounded warfighters’ medical treatment, and ultimately, their survivability.”

Annually, the USTRANSCOM-led Ultimate Caduceus command-post and field-training exercise evaluates the command’s capability and capacity to conduct global patient movement in a contingency or conflict, as well as assesses the interoperability across services, government, and interagency partners. This year’s exercise occurs at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, in June, and will feature significant VA participation. The host installation will act as the FCC hub, distributing patients to spoke medical treatment facilities located in nine nearby metropolitan areas.

“As the lead for global patient movement, USTRANSCOM ensures the safe, secure, and sound transport of our nation’s wounded warfighters inside and outside of CONUS,” Andrus said. “Throughout the 24/7 process, our incredible team executes this unique mission with the utmost professionalism, precision, and proficiency, always putting each patient –and their medical care – first and foremost.” 

USTRANSCOM exists as a warfighting combatant command to project and sustain military power at a time and place of the nation’s choosing. Powered by dedicated men and women, we underwrite the lethality of the Joint Force, we advance American interests around the globe, and we provide our nation's leaders with strategic flexibility to select from multiple options, while creating multiple dilemmas for our adversaries.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Expeditionary Medical Force Brings Optimal Readiness in Pacific Region

Article Around MHS
10/18/2021
A male soldier talks about a chart to to a female sailor.

The 121st Field Hospital of the 549th Hospital Center recently introduced an innovative way to increase medical Soldiers’ proficiency and competency by enhancing access to the field hospital equipment.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Combat Support

WICC Podcast

Photo
10/18/2021

Today’s female service member population is now at 17%.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Warrior Care | Total Force Fitness

Brain Resilliance

Photo
10/14/2021
Enriched environments and new experiences encourage brain plasticity. When you learn something new—such as a new instrument, language, skill, or sport—new neuropathways are created in your brain.

Soldiers training for operations.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Total Force Fitness | In the Spotlight

Health Promotion duo optimizes health on Incirlik Air Base

Article Around MHS
9/30/2021
Air Force Capt. Sydney Sloan, 39th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron health promotion element chief (right), and Air Force Senior Airman Gloriann Manapsal, 39th Operational Medical Readiness Squadron health promotion technician (left), promote making healthy choices at the Sultan’s Inn Dining Facility on Incirlik Air Base, Turkey.

The 39th Operation Medical Readiness Squadron health promotion team provides and integrates evidence-based programs to optimize the health and readiness, even during these unprecedented times.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Total Force Fitness | Coronavirus

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 07 - July 2021

Report
7/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Long-acting reversible contraceptive use, active component service women, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020; Oral cavity and pharynx cancers, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2007–2019; The evolution of military health surveillance reporting: a historical review.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

Army’s 773rd administers mobile COVID-19 testing during DEF21

Article
6/4/2021
Three military personnel, wearing masks and lab coats, pose for a picture in an Albanian lab.

Approximately 800 Army Reserve soldiers from the U.S. and Europe participated in DEFENDER-Europe 21.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | Readiness Capabilities

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 06 - June 2021

Report
6/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: The cost of lower extremity fractures among active duty U.S. Army soldiers, 2017; Early identification of SARS-CoV-2 emergence in the Department of Defense via retrospective analysis of 2019–2020 upper respiratory illness samples; Brief report: Medical encounters for snakebite envenomation, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020; Department of Defense mid-season vaccine effectiveness estimates for the 2019–2020 influenza season.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

MHS Minute May 2021

Video
5/28/2021
Image of MHS Minute Carousel

In this month's MHS Minute, the DHA's commitment to transforming military health continues. The DHA officially established the Tidewater market in SE Virginia, serving over 200,000 patients. The MHS is standing up 19 markets like Tidewater to allow healthcare providers to better meet the needs of their patients by improving coordination between facilities in the area.

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | Health Readiness | MHS GENESIS

ADVISOR brings support to medical personnel in austere environments

Article
5/27/2021
Photo of Michael Kile, LPN, the operational readiness program manger

The Military Health System offers the Advanced Virtual Support for Operational Forces program, or ADVISOR, for remote military medical professionals.

Recommended Content:

Technology | Combat Support | Health Readiness

Signs and symptoms of a stroke, and what to do about them

Article
5/18/2021
Infographic about the sign of a stroke

For Stroke Awareness Month, we highlight some of the most important facts about strokes in men and women.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Traumatic Brain Injury

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 05 - May 2021

Report
5/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Hospitalizations, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Ambulatory visits, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Surveillance snapshot: Illness and injury burdens, reserve component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Surveillance snapshot: Illness and injury burdens, recruit trainees, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Medical evacuations out of the U.S. Central Command, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, deployed active and reserve component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, non-service member beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2020.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 04 - April 2021

Report
4/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Disparities in COVID-19 vaccine initiation and completion among active component service members and healthcare personnel, 11 December 2020–12 March 2021; Update: Heat illness, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2020; Update: Exertional rhabdomyolysis, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016–2020; Update: Exertional hyponatremia, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2005–2020; Skin and soft tissue infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, January 2016–September 2020.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

METC trains dietician techs to build, support a Medically Ready Force

Article
3/18/2021
Military health personnel preparing food trays while wearing a face mask

Nutrition plays an important role in military readiness.

Recommended Content:

Nutritional Fitness | Total Force Fitness | Health Readiness

MSMR Vol. 28 No. 03 - March 2021

Report
3/1/2021

A monthly publication of the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Division. This issue of the peer-reviewed journal contains the following articles: Influenza surveillance trends and influenza vaccine effectiveness among Department of Defense beneficiaries during the 2019–2020 influenza season; Influenza outbreak during Exercise Talisman Sabre, Queensland, Australia, July 2019; Update: Sexually transmitted infections, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2012–2020; A retrospective cohort study of blood lead levels among special operations forces soldiers exposed to lead at a firing range in Germany.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Public Health

Army hospital powers through record-breaking winter storms

Article
2/22/2021
A military medical center covered in snow

BAMC comes away from major winter storm unscathed.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Readiness Capabilities
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 46

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.