Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Athletic trainers are enablers of Marine Corps readiness

Marine Corps Pfc. Barbara Pujolllopiz, (left), an administrative specialist with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, performs ammo can lifts while Capt. Katheryn Evazich, the MEU's adjutant, observes and counts repetitions during a Combat Fitness Test aboard Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The CFT is an annual Marine Corps physical training requirement in the which assesses combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tawanya Norwood) Marine Corps Pfc. Barbara Pujolllopiz, (left), an administrative specialist with the 22nd Marine Expeditionary Unit, performs ammo can lifts while Capt. Katheryn Evazich, the MEU's adjutant, observes and counts repetitions during a Combat Fitness Test aboard Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. The CFT is an annual Marine Corps physical training requirement in the which assesses combat readiness. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Tawanya Norwood)

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness

After serving at both Recruit Depots, Marine Corps Schools of Infantry East and West, Officer Candidate School, and The Basic School throughout the last 17 years, athletic trainers are now being assigned to units in the fleet.

Since late 2018, athletic trainers have been slowly arriving at units throughout the Marine Corps to help keep Marines in the fight longer. Because of their immediate availability at the unit level to commanders and Marines, athletic trainers are able to work with the Force Fitness Readiness Center to educate and prevent injuries before they come serious.

With the combination of one-on-one care, their immediate availability, and involvement with force fitness instructors in conducting training courses, education and preventative measures commanders have seen a marked impact on operational readiness of individual Marines and their units.

“These are athletes, combat athletes,” said Whitney Lee, an athletic trainer with 4th Marine Regiment on Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan. “In the civilian world, you think of [Division] 1 sports, pro sports, [they] have athletic trainers. They have them for a reason. They’re there to take care of the injury, to make sure everybody’s ready and resilient.”

Lee is one of several athletic trainers that are part of the Marine Corps Sports Medicine Injury Prevention Program. The goal of the program is to reduce attrition and lost work days associated with musculoskeletal injuries. The Marine Corps has been utilizing certified athletic trainers to assist in preventing or mitigating injuries to reduce the need for advanced medical intervention. In addition, athletic trainers provide nutritional and expert physical counseling and education to keep Marines fit and healthy.

“Having an athletic trainer on staff can decrease injury wait time from four weeks to two weeks, depending on what it is,” Lee said. “We’re available to catch it quickly and we’re bridging that gap of injury to Navy medicine.”

Training and education are a huge part of an athletic trainers’ job. Matthew Driscoll, an athletic trainer aboard Camp Schwab, treats every injury as an opportunity to teach.

“Anytime I receive a patient, I think of them not only as a patient, but as a student,” Driscoll said. “I’m getting somebody that is hurt, they want to know what is going on with them, they want to know what they can do to prevent that injury from getting worse and from happening again.”

According to Driscoll, prevention is everything. Athletic trainers want to educate the Marines on how to avoid injury by promoting proper nutrition and the right diet to sustain activities as well as proper exercise techniques.

“We do biomechanical assessments, teach maintenance exercises, and coach stretching. It’s a good diverse skill set that I’m able to practice [while] working with [the Marines],” Driscoll said.

Marine Corps Col. Michael Quinto, commanding officer of Marine Aircraft Group 14 on Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, N.C., received his units first athletic trainer in late 2018 and immediately witnessed the impact having athletic trainers on staff has had on his force.

“The athletic trainers that are working for you are one of the best assets that I have had as a commander,” Quinto said. “They really provide great insight into understanding the health of your force. They are complimentary to Navy medicine, so once they’ve gone through the Navy medicine process, they are both before and after an excellent asset to get your Marines back in the fight and the final thing is, the morale of the unit as well as the individual Marine to feel as though they are no kidding an elite warrior in this organization is outstanding.”

Ben McGrath, an athletic trainer assigned to Marine Aircraft Group 14, understands how important it is to keep Marines in the fight.

“Ideally we are keeping them on full duty as opposed to getting put on light duty and wasting two weeks basically where they can’t do anything,” McGrath said. “We are trying to get them back as quickly as possible and as safely as possible.”

And it’s working.

Marine Corps Cpl. John Crespo, an infantryman assigned to 2nd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment on Camp Schwab, is currently working with the athletic trainers.

“After years of being a machine gunner, constant hikes, field ops, …having a place like this [and access to] physical therapy gives us the opportunity to rehabilitate and get healthy so we can continue fighting right,” Crespo said.

Marine Corps Col. Jason Perry, commanding officer of 4th Marine Regiment, received his athletic trainers about a year ago. He noted how much the athletic trainers are working to make sure they know exactly what Marines do, so they can provide the right training and the right care to keep Marines in the fight.

“Both of my athletic trainers have shown just a tremendous amount of interest in the Marine Corps, how we’re structured, how we work, what our day to day jobs are,” Perry said. “They’ve shown a keen interest in that and they want to find ways to contribute, even in ways we probably haven’t even thought of yet. I think having an open mind and seeking opportunities both in education and hands on treatment, every aspect of physical readiness is open to your imagination with the athletic trainers.”

Athletic trainers are on staff at installations in Hawaii, Japan, Cherry Point, Camp Lejeune, Camp Pendleton, and Twentynine Palms. The Marine Corps hopes to expand the Sports Medicine Injury Prevention Program further throughout the operating forces in the future so even more Marines can participate and benefit.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity. Read original post.

You also may be interested in...

Listen to Your Body: If It Doesn’t Feel ‘Good,’ It Probably Isn’t

Article
10/27/2021
Three soldiers running on blacktop road in the country

Avoiding serious injuries when it comes to working out is all about knowing how to interpret signals from your body and knowing the difference between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ pain, experts say.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Pain Management

Ultra-Endurance Military Athletes: What Motivates Them?

Article
10/25/2021
U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Duane Zitta on top of a mountain

For some, sports are a way to stay fit, for extreme endurance military athletes, it’s a way of life and a way to challenge themselves physically and mentally.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness

Ask the Doc: Am I Running Too Much?

Article
10/21/2021
Marine Corps recruits run in formation

Doc talks to Navy Lt. Cmdr. Aaron Stoll, a physical therapist at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, about the causes and cures for pain resulting from running.

Recommended Content:

Pain Management | Physical Fitness | Ask The Doc

Marine Corps Motivational Run

Photo
10/21/2021
Marine Corps recruits run in formation

Marines with Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, participate in a motivational run at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, Oct. 14 (Photo by Lance Cpl. Julian Elliott-Drouin, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego).

Recommended Content:

Pain Management | Physical Fitness

Tips for How to ‘Train Right’ and Avoid Injuries During Sports and PT

Article
10/13/2021
Military personnel in physical threapy

Physical training, recreational activities, and sports are key to service members’ health but musculoskeletal injuries due to sudden incidents and repeated stress or overuse are the biggest health problem in the U.S. military.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness | Injury Prevention

Momentum builds as Army implements Holistic Health and Fitness

Article Around MHS
10/5/2021
Soldiers prepare to exercise.

The Army’s implementation of Holistic Health and Fitness, or H2F, has made significant progress over the past year as the Army’s primary investment in Soldier readiness and lethality.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness

Finding time for fitness during the work week just got easier

Article Around MHS
9/29/2021
A person works out the gym.

The new Army Civilian Fitness and Health Promotion Program now encourages employees to focus on fitness while at work.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Total Force Fitness

Regular physical activity is important for health and performance

Article Around MHS
9/29/2021
A Coast Guardsman works out at Coast Guard Air Station Savannah.

Those who get at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity every week have a much lower risk of obesity, diabetes, cancer, and heart disease—the top killers of Americans every year.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness

JRTC, Fort Polk promote health, fitness for civilian workforce

Article Around MHS
9/23/2021
Luewana Hannon (left), community ready and resilient integrator, provides information to Georgia Louis (right) during the education and information fair at the Join Readiness Training Center and Fort Polk Army Community Service, Sept. 20.

The Civilian Fitness and Health Promotions Program hosted an education and information fair at the Join Readiness Training Center and Fort Polk Army Community Service, Sept. 20.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness

As Fitness Tests Resume, Troops Seek Post-COVID Exercise Routines

Article
8/31/2021
Military personnel physically training

Keeping fit during pandemic proves hard for some.

Recommended Content:

Total Body Preventive Health and Total Force Fitness | Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness | Coronavirus

How Good Diet and Exercise Prevent Injury and Disease

Article
8/30/2021
Photo of group doing pushups.

A proper diet and exercise regimen can ward off disease and aid in maintaining your health.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Total Force Fitness | Total Body Preventive Health and Total Force Fitness

Total Force Fitness Physical

Infographic
7/21/2021
Total Force Fitness - Total Body Preventive Health and Physical Fitness - Ability to physically accomplish all tasks while remaining mission capable and avoiding injury

Total Force Fitness - Total Body Preventive Health and Physical Fitness - Ability to physically accomplish all tasks while remaining mission capable and avoiding injury

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health Toolkit | Total Body Preventive Health and Total Force Fitness | Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness

AJ-Maste Yoga: Tips for a Healthy Deployment

Article
7/13/2021
Military personnel doing a yoga pose

Yoga comes in many forms and fashions, and has proven health benefits.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Total Force Fitness

Ask the Doc: Fitness Freaking Out

Article
5/26/2021
Integrating healthy snacks like fruit into kid’s diets will teach them healthy eating habits. September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness month. (U.S. Air Force photo by Sabrina Fine)

Dear Doc: It seems like every time I go to the commissary, my daughter, 6, and son, 7, tend to gravitate toward the sugary cereals and frozen pizzas, and always want candy bars and sodas at the checkout. As far as I know, and as has been proven by their regularly scheduled check-ups, they are both in great health. The mother in me wants to give them what they want, but the former college athlete and current fitness freak in me is afraid that this might become a problem. For me, eating healthy has become a normal part of my life, and I've come to enjoy things that are healthy and taste good. Aside from tricking them, what can I do to get my kids to eat (and enjoy) more healthy foods? — Fitness Freaking Out

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Nutritional Fitness | Ask The Doc

TFF cogs Physical 1200x675

Infographic
5/19/2021
Social media graphic for Vision and Hearing Loss Prevention Month and Physical Fitness

“Vision and Hearing and Physical Fitness. Ability to physically accomplish all tasks while remaining mission capable and avoiding injury.”

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness Toolkit | Total Force Fitness | Physical Fitness | Vision and Hearing Loss Prevention
<< < 1 2 3 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 3

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.