Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Dating violence has consequences for teen victims

Midori Robinson, Kyleigh Rose and Keisha McNeill paint their hands so they can put a handprint on the “Love is Respect” mural during the Camp Zama Youth Center Teen Dating Violence Awareness Lock-In at Camp Zama. (U.S. Army photo by Winifred Brown) From left, Midori Robinson, Kyleigh Rose and Keisha McNeill paint their hands so they can put a handprint on the “Love is Respect” mural during the Camp Zama Youth Center Teen Dating Violence Awareness Lock-In at Camp Zama. (U.S. Army photo by Winifred Brown)

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Total Force Fitness

February is Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month. Such violence can be physical, emotional, or sexual. It can happen in person or online. In all cases, teen dating violence puts great strain on families, including those in the military. To combat it, many resources and strategies are available to military parents.

Nearly 1 in 11 female and about 1 in 15 male high school students reported physical dating violence in the last year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey and the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey. For sexual dating violence, about 1 in 9 female and 1 in 36 male high school students reported incidents in the last year.

Dating violence affects millions of U.S. teens. CDC figures show that about 11 million women and 5 million men who reported dating violence in their lifetime said they first experienced such incidents before the age of 18. These episodes included sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner.

Teen dating violence has potential long-term effects. The CDC says depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts are more likely among victims. There’s also greater risk of using tobacco, drugs, and alcohol. Those who suffered dating violence in high school are at greater risk of being victimized later.

Military parents have access to information, resources, and strategies to help their teens. Parents can speak with a Family Advocacy Program or FAP representative. FAP reps can be found at an Army Community Services Center, Navy Fleet and Family Readiness Center, Airman and Family Readiness Office, or Marine or Family Programs Office.

FAP reps can counsel parents and victims. They can also provide training on the warning signs of teen dating violence and assist inside schools, if needed, said Jenny Marsh, an FAP representative at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall in Arlington, Virginia. And, Marsh said, an FAP rep can discuss with military parents ways to remove victims from harmful situations.

The Total Force Fitness framework is another way to strengthen service families and help prevent teen dating violence. The framework encourages service members to look at fitness of the mind, body, and spirit as a package to stay ready and resilient.

“For service families, attaining and maintaining the social domain of the military’s Total Force Fitness framework can help prevent teen dating violence,” said USPHS Capt. Kimberly Elenberg. “That’s because it calls for strengthening relationships and developing influential peer-to-peer networks.” Elenberg also serves as director of the Total Force Fitness branch.

The TFF description of social fitness says it helps military families focus on “strong and productive personal and professional relationships.” The goal is to create a structure of family, friends, and peers that can be relied on.

For more information about preventing teen dating violence, visit the CDC website or call 1-800-CDC-INFO.

You also may be interested in...

DODEA Schools Keeps On With In-Person Classes, and Fall Sports, Too

Article
9/23/2021
Kids playing football

DODEA schools are striving to continue in-person learning in the 2021-22 school year.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Coronavirus

Don't Hesitate: Vaccinate Today for School

Article
8/13/2021
A boy gets the COVID-19 vaccine

Back to School Means Vaccine Time

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | Coronavirus | Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Vaccine Recommendations | Children's Health | Immunizations | TRICARE Health Program

TRICARE: Back-to-School Season!

Video
8/12/2021
Back to School Season

It's #BacktoSchool season! Busy buying school supplies, backpacks, and clothes for the fall? But have you scheduled your child's preventive health exams and immunizations? Be sure to follow these tips: https://go.usa.gov/xFQCD #BacktoSchool2021

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Health Program | Children's Health | Changes to TRICARE

Back to School Fast Tips

Video
8/11/2021
Back to School Fast Tips

Here are some fast tips for a smooth and safe transition to getting back to school this year.

Recommended Content:

August Toolkit | Back to School | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Children's Health

Lead Level Screening and Testing for Children

Report
8/10/2021

S. 1790 NDAA Conference Report for FY 2020, 116-333 Sec. 703

Recommended Content:

Children's Health

MHS and MOS Town Hall To Your Health: Back to School

Article
8/10/2021
Infographic about the To Your Health Town Hall

MHS and Military OneSource presents a summer safety discussion with experts about Back to School Vaccinations and Beyond

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Children's Health | MHS and Military OneSource To Your Health

Vaccinations To Your Health

Video
8/9/2021
Infographic about MHS and MOS  Town Hall

Join us live with Defense Health Agency and Board Certified Family Nurse Practitioner, Ann Morse, to discuss vaccines, vaccine safety and tips for keeping your military family healthy as the new school year approaches.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Children's Health | MHS and Military OneSource To Your Health

How You Can Prevent This Cancer-Causing Sexually Transmitted Infection

Article
8/4/2021
Doctor talking to a boy

Get the HPV vaccinations for cancer prevention if you haven’t already

Recommended Content:

Immunization Awareness Month | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Children's Health | Immunizations

Helping a Military Child Heal After Loss Infographic

Publication
6/23/2021

Learn ways to support military children as they navigate the grieving process and begin to heal.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health

Retinopathy of Prematurity, Important Focus for Military Eye Doctors

Article
6/23/2021
Health personnel conducting a morning assessment on an infant

Retinopathy of Prematurity is a little-known disease with big risks.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | Centers of Excellence

NMRTU Everett pediatrician continues to provide patient-centered care

Article
6/11/2021
Military health personnel wearing a face mask examining a new born baby

NMRTU pediatrician cares for her patients, one child at a time.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health

Based on data, MHS experts encourage vaccines for adolescents

Article
6/1/2021
Sister and brother smiling at each other

With the Pfizer vaccine approved for youth ages 12 to 15, MHS adolescents are lining up to get the COVID-19 vaccine.

Recommended Content:

COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts | Children's Health | Vaccine Eligibility

Adolescents ages 12 and older eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations

Article
5/27/2021
Son of military personnel receiving his COVID-19 vaccine

Pfizer vaccine now authorized for children 12 and older.

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | Coronavirus

Military kids are resilient, but far from immune to pandemic effects

Article
4/28/2021
Military personnel wearing face mask holding up posters for Month of the Military Child

Military children are known for being resilient to constant change, but COVID-19 has affected their mental health, too.

Recommended Content:

Month of the Military Child Toolkit | Children's Health | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | Staying Resilient | Coronavirus

Ten ways parents can help kids make good nutritional choices

Article
4/27/2021
Image of a colorful plate outlining the portions and serving sizes of each type of food.

Nutrition is a key element of Total Force Fitness, but it’s just as important to encourage kids to make smart nutritional choices.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Month of the Military Child Toolkit | Children's Health | Nutritional Fitness
<< < 1 2 3 4 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 4

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.