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Navy Care virtual health app wins innovation award

Soldier in front of a computer monitor Cmdr. Michael Leader, a physician at Naval Branch Health Clinic Jacksonville, conducts a virtual health visit with a patient using Navy Care. The Navy Care virtual health app recently won a 2020 FedHealthIT Innovation Award. Nominated and chosen by their peers, winning programs took on achievable risks and delivered results in support of their mission. (U.S. Navy photo by Jacob Sippel, Naval Hospital Jacksonville/Released).

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Navy Care, the virtual health app at Naval Hospital Jacksonville, was recently announced as a 2020 FedHealthIT Innovation Award winner.

Navy Care offers a live, virtual visit with a clinician — from the patient's smartphone, laptop, or computer. Patients can use it from home, work, or wherever they want to receive care. It’s private, secure, and free.

“Navy Care is a win-win,” said Capt. Matthew Case, Naval Hospital Jacksonville commander. “It improves readiness for our military service members at the deckplate, and helps family members by reducing their in-person visits to our facility.”

Since its launch as a Navy Medicine pilot at NH Jacksonville in January 2018, Navy Care has enrolled more than 17,600 patients and hosted nearly 11,500 virtual visits.

Patients with a primary care manager at Naval Hospital Jacksonville (or its branch health clinics in Albany, Jacksonville, Key West, Kings Bay, or Mayport) can enroll by visiting https://Navy.Care or by downloading the Navy Care app for iOS or Android operating system.

Patients can make a Navy Care appointment by calling their clinic’s appointment line, or by virtually walking-in to Navy Care On Demand (weekdays during business hours), selecting a waiting room, and selecting a provider.

The Innovation Awards were presented at a virtual ceremony on June 3. Nominated and chosen by their peers, winning programs took on achievable risks and delivered results in support of their mission.

Naval Hospital Jacksonville and Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Jacksonville deliver quality health care, in an integrated system of readiness and health. NH Jacksonville includes five branch health clinics across Florida and Georgia. It serves 163,000 active-duty, family members, and retired service members, including 75,000 patients who are enrolled with a primary care manager. NMRTC Jacksonville ensures warfighters’ medical readiness to deploy and clinicians’ readiness to save lives. NMRTC Jacksonville includes five units across Florida and Georgia. To find out more, visit www.tricare.mil/MTF/jacksonville.

Disclaimer:  Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity.  Read original post.

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