Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

BAMC follows through with redesignation of Army’s WTBs

Soldier in front of flag speaking into microphone U.S. Army Lt. Col. Andrea Castillon, Warrior Transition Battalion commander, delivers remarks during a tree dedication ceremony at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, June 3, 2020. The WTB will be renamed as the Soldier Recovery Unit on June 23, 2020. (U.S. Army photo by Jason W. Edwards)

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

In November 2019, the Army announced the restructuring of its Warrior Care and Transition Program, and formally recognized itself as the Army Recovery Care Program. The Warrior Transition Battalions would soon restructure and re-designate as Soldier Recovery Units.

Brooke Army Medical Center’s WTB made the formal announcement of the pending change on June 3, 2020, with a brief tree dedication ceremony.

Army Lt. Col. Andrea Castillon, BAMC WTB commander, designated a special site near the organization’s offices where a commemorative “WTB” tree will be planted. “Trees are well known as symbols of immense and enduring strength, which couldn’t be more appropriate given the mission of our battalion,” she stated.

Inactivating a unit looks easy to bystanders attending a ceremony, but there is much coordination and work behind the scenes to follow Army Regulation 870-20: Army Museums, Historical Artifacts, and Art. According to this regulation, units must work closely with the Center of Military History for the proper handling of organizational history files, unit historical property, and operational records.

Members of a unit often develop a bond with the history and pride in its colors, or guidon. Change can be difficult to get used to, particularly when WTBs have countless testimonials of past and present Soldiers and veterans, expressing how the programs within them saved their lives.

“Although change is inevitable, we will remain a premier organization for the healing and transition of our Soldiers,” said Castillon. She is confident in the smooth re-flagging of her unit because the fundamental foundation of WTB’s culture is adaptability.

The SRU’s three primary platoons are Complex Care, Veteran Track and Return to Duty. This restructuring will simplify and streamline policy, remove barriers, and tailor services to fit the unique needs of every Soldier.

“Our adaptability and resilience prepare us for what is on the horizon, and will help us successfully navigate this new terrain together as a team,” added Castillon. “We pride ourselves in being a place to heal and transition, and our camaraderie transcends re-naming and time.”

The official re-flagging ceremony will take place on June 23, 2020.

You also may be interested in...

Keesler Medical Center receives national recognition

Article
11/27/2019
Keesler was one of 56 participating hospitals to be recognized in both patient care categories – all patients and high risk patients. (U.S. Air Force photo)

The ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program recognized Keesler Medical Center

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Award-winning Navy team successfully improves care for women, infants

Article
11/26/2019
Labor and Delivery providers were the front-line adopters of the Induction of Labor care pathway at Naval Medical Center San Diego. As of July 2019, over 80 percent of the hospital’s providers were using the pathway. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joseph A. Boomhower)

An award-winning team of nurses successfully implemented a treatment guide at Naval Medical Center San Diego that improves labor and delivery outcomes

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Children's Health | Women's Health | Nurses Week

Lending a helping, healing hand

Article
11/20/2019
Navy Capt. Johannes Bailey, Naval Hospital Bremerton Director for Nursing Services (left) and Navy Lt. Kaitlyn Harmon, NHB Multi Service Unit (right), flank Army 1st Lt. Lauren Odegaard, from Madigan Army Medical Center, for a photo op after thanking her for her assistance. Odegaard provided assistance for the month of October in NHB's MSU to help with staffing shortages. (U.S. Navy photo by Douglas H. Stutz)

Army nurse supports Navy hospital

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | Nurses Week

Artificial intelligence makes its way to dermatology clinic

Article
11/18/2019
Air Force Maj. Thomas Beachkofsky, 6th Health Care Operations Squadron dermatologist, uses a body scanner microscope to take a picture of a spot on his arm at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida. A new software upgrade allows a complex algorithm to analyze an image captured with a camera and rate the severity of the spot for a dermatologist to review. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Adam R. Shanks)

The software was able to correctly identify 95% of malignant skin tumors

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Technology

Nellis medical center celebrates 25 years

Article
11/13/2019
Air Force Col. Alfred Flowers, 99th Medical Group commander, and Army Staff Sgt. Michael O’Callaghan, (grandson of the former Gov. O’Callaghan) reveal a portrait of O’Callaghan during a ceremony celebrating the Mike O’Callaghan Military Medical Center’s 25th Anniversary on Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada, Nov. 12, 2019. The portrait will hang in the MOMMC to honor the center's namesake. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Kevin Tanenbaum)

The Mike O’Callaghan Military Medical Center celebrated 25 years of operation Nov. 12

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Womack Army Medical Center named Level III trauma center

Article
11/12/2019
Local medical partners conduct a 'trace the trauma' tour Nov. 6 after Womack Army Medical Center celebrated their integration into the North Carolina American College of Surgeons Level III Trauma designation. (U.S. Army photo by Twana Atkinson)

Trauma is the leading cause of death for Americans age 45 and younger

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

Air Force transitions all U.S. military treatment facilities to DHA administration, management

Article
10/31/2019
This October, U.S.-based Air Force military treatment facilities transferred administration and management to the Defense Health Agency. (U.S. Air Force illustration)

Congress directed this transfer in the fiscal year 2017 National Defense Authorization Act

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Joint Army-Air Force-Navy medical partnership saves lives downrange

Article
10/29/2019
Airmen work with members of the Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation team to save the life of a NATO troop at the Craig Joint-Theater Hospital on Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Nicholas Rau)

More than 100 medics from the 59th Medical Wing deployed

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics

DHA's management of hospitals and clinics 'all about the patient'

Article
10/29/2019
Great outcomes, a ready medical force, satisfied patients – all flow directly from a patient-centered approach. As DHA assumes responsibility for military health care facilities across the entire Department of Defense, we aim to operate each hospital and clinic so that it improves the lives and health of our patients. It’s more than a pledge – it’s our mission. (DoD photo)

Great outcomes, a ready medical force, satisfied patients

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

State of the art procedure is the first within DoD

Article
10/28/2019
Retired Capt. Eugene Chalaire was the first to undergo an intricate cancer-preventive procedure performed at Womack Army Medical Center this summer. Womack is the first within the DoD to offer this service. (U.S. Army photo)

Only a handful of medical centers in the United States perform this surgery

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics
<< < 1 2 > >> 
Showing results 16 - 25 Page 2 of 2

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.