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I am Navy Medicine: Lt. Daniel Murrish

Image of Lt. Daniel Murrish wearing a mask Navy Lt. Daniel Murrish, laboratory department head and officer mentor, provides lab support and leadership to Navy Medicine and Readiness Training Command Cherry Point, at Marine Corps Air Station - Cherry Point in North Carolina.

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“I am Lt. Daniel Murrish, Laboratory department head, assigned to Navy Medicine and Readiness Training Command Cherry Point (NMRTCCP), N.C.”

Murrish was recently selected as NMRTCCP’s Officer of the Year for calendar year 2019. While assigned to Cherry Point, Murrish has developed an Officer Mentorship Program with input from executive leadership to optimize availability and awareness of useful career resources among naval officers onboard Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point. Murrish has also served as Acting Director for Clinical Support Services. 

“Lieutenant Murrish was selected from an extremely competitive group of high-performing officers,” said NMRTC Cherry Point Commanding Officer Capt. Doug Stephens. “Besides being the Laboratory Services department head, he is also the urinalysis program coordinator and the command diversity officer. His quiet professionalism and enthusiastic support of enlisted education and development truly make him an example.”

Murrish, a Medical Service Corps (MSC) officer from Santa Rosa, Calif., became interested in a career in Navy medicine after hearing of his grandfather’s actions as a hospital corpsman during the Korean War.

“I graduated high school when I was 15 after I passed the California High School equivalency/proficiency examination in 1997, said Murrish. “I received my bachelor’s degree from Thomas Edison State University, and in 2017, I received my MBA in Health Care Management from Saint Leo University,”

During a break in active-duty service, he worked at Harrison Medical Center, Bremerton, Wash., where he employed transfusion medicine protocols and supported the laboratory’s role in the management of heart surgeries and treatment of dialysis and hematology-oncology patients. He returned to the Navy as an ensign in the MSC.

“My first assignment as an officer was at Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune (NMCCL) as a division officer, safety officer and chemical hygiene officer for the laboratory department,” Murrish said. “During my final year at NMCCL, I served as an officer in charge of laboratory logistics, planning and operations in support of Continuing Promise, 2018, a diplomatic medical and Expeditionary Medical Unit test mission conducted in Central America. There were many challenges that we faced as a team. We hustled all day, every day, barring a few well-earned days of R&R. It was exhausting at times, but the trust and camaraderie that developed was incredibly energizing.”

Murrish leads NMRTCCP’s diversity committee, which he says has opened up a fantastic opportunity to engage community leaders, organize events and support local schools and non-profit organizations.

Outside of NMRTCCP, Murrish continues to look for ways to grow both personally and professionally.

“I’ve maintained a chiropractic license since 2006,” Murrish said. “I also look for new perspectives on leadership, philosophy, and developing healthy relationships (mostly from books and podcasts). Gaining knowledge in these areas has never failed to improve my life experience in significant and lasting ways.

Disclaimer: Re-published content may be edited for length and clarity.  Read original post.

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