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MHS GENESIS helps DGMC deliver life-saving blood

Technician wearing a mask, scanning in a label on a unit of blood. A1C Jakub Lopez, blood bank technician, scanning a unit of blood into MHS GENESIS inventory. MHS GENESIS serves as both an electronic health record and electronic blood management system. (Photo submitted by 60th Medical Group, David Grant USAF Medical Center)

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MHS GENESIS

A typical blood transfusion can be completed in one to four hours, but the first 15 minutes are crucial. In that first quarter-hour, vital signs and blood documentation are recorded and any risks in the transfusion spotted. A medical center relying on a manual documentation system can experience complications within that short window. For the 60th Medical Group staff from David Grant USAF Medical Center, stationed at Travis Air Force Base in California, the roll out of the Military Health System’s electronic health record MHS GENESIS saved both time and manpower to complete blood transfusions for their patients.

Air Force Capt. Seng Patton, chief of Transfusion Services and Microbiology at DGMC, said that before MHS GENESIS, the DGMC’s blood bank and clinical areas used four different electronic health systems that did not communicate with each other. These systems required technicians to enter data by hand into each system.

The Blood Bridge in MHS GENESIS automated the transfusion process at DGMC into one system, allowing its blood bank to communicate electronically with other areas of the hospital. The positive patient identification function of MHS GENESIS helps DGMC identify patients that need blood products with a simple scan instead of involving another person to verify patient identity. Then the system matches any blood specimens drawn from the patient to their electronic record.

Patton said that the new system allowed the seamless delivery of life-saving blood products from the blood bank to the facility’s inpatient wards and surgical suites. The comprehensive system reduced record-keeping redundancies in the blood bank and increased compliance with document regulations. DGMC was already able to meet the national standard of 15 minutes to provide emergency blood products to the patient care team, but MHS GENESIS reduced that time to under 10 minutes.

“Timeliness is so important for blood transfusions, especially emergency transfusions,” Patton said, “The blood bank technicians fully embrace and appreciate that they do not have to document the same things into different electronic systems, saving precious time that can be devoted to critical tasks.”

Patton appreciates that MHS GENESIS allows interdisciplinary teams to come together to improve care for patients. This connection extends outside of just DGMC to other commands that also use MHS GENESIS.

“The most beneficial aspect of the system is that we are all connected,” Patton said. “Every location that has MHS GENESIS will have access to the patient’s entire record from the start of MHS GENESIS. Collaboration with Veterans Affairs means that those records will be available, too. So no matter where a patient goes, as long as they have MHS GENESIS, we will be able to see that information throughout.”

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DHA IPM 19-004: Utilization of the Case Management (CM) Registry (Active and Screening) for Military Health System (MHS) Beneficiaries

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures to: Outline responsibilities for MHS and Service Department CM personnel to utilize the CM Screening Registry; Identify requirements to utilize CM coding in alignment with current MHS CM coding guidance; and Require the use of standardized Adult and Pediatric Tri-Service Workflow (TSWF) forms for CM documentation (inclusive of telephonic, virtual, or face to face screening) located within AHLTA system and future Electronic Health Record MHS GENESIS

DHA-PI 6025.32: MHS GENESIS Medical Device

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This DHA-PI establishes Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures to provide key stakeholders’ responsibilities for connecting medical devices to MHS GENESIS; establish clinical expectations for connecting medical devices to MHS GENESIS; provide references for MTFs to use in procuring medical devices that will be connected to MHS GENESIS; and provide process for MTFs to elevate medical device connection issues related to MHS GENESIS.

DHA IPM 18-021: Guidance for Immediate Completion and Closure of Open Encounters and Records in Legacy Systems

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Interim Procedures Memorandum (DHA-IPM), based on the authority of References (a) through (c), and in accordance with the guidance of References (d) and (e): • Establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures to complete and close open encounters within the legacy systems in preparation for the implementation of Military Health System (MHS) GENESIS. • Identifies and delineates responsibilities associated with completing and closing open encounters within the legacy systems in preparation for the implementation of MHS GENESIS. • Should be used by DoD military treatment facilities (MTFs) to update procedures and workflows that pertain to the DoD Health Record Management, Patient Administration, and other MTF functions impacted by these decisions. • Is effective immediately; it must be incorporated into a DHA-Procedural Instruction. This DHA-IPM will expire effective 12 months from the date of issue.

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