Back to Top Skip to main content

Madigan collects CCP in fight against COVID-19

Four people in a hospital room wearing masks Frank Wake, left, works with COVID-19 survivor, Karen Conley, to draw convalescent plasma through a process called plasmapheresis. Apheresis nurse Steve Christodoulou, right, explains the process to Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Thomas McCaffery as he visits the Armed Services Blood Bank Center - Pacific Northwest at Madigan Army Medical Center on Joint Base Lewis-McChord in Tacoma Washington.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Convalescent Plasma Collection Program

The COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma (CCP) Collection Program is a Department of Defense effort to obtain 10,000 units CCP with emphasis on blood donations by members of the military community who have recovered from the disease. CCP will be given to critically ill patients, and to support the development of an effective treatment against the disease. Potential donors should visit the Armed Services Blood Program website at: https://www.militaryblood.dod.mil/Donors/COVID-19andBloodDonation.aspx - to find a complete list of available collection centers.


The world is searching for a treatment, a cure and a prevention for COVID-19. One piece of that puzzle may be tapped via the sap of human life – blood. At Madigan Army Medical Center, and 19 other Department of Defense facilities, those who have recovered from COVID-19 can donate the liquid part of their blood – the plasma – in an effort to apply it to use as a treatment for those battling the disease now.

Health Affairs Thomas McCaffery made a special stop at the Armed Services Blood Bank Center - Pacific Northwest (ASBBC-PNW) to talk to the staff about convalescent plasma and the DoD’s effort to collect 10,000 units by Sept. 30.

“We are doing this across the DoD, across the Military Health System,” said McCaffery. “This is an all-in effort, we are counting down to the end of September to get those ten thousand units.”

Army Maj. Juan Guzman, the chief of the ASBBC-PNW, toured McCaffery through the center’s operations; which was started with Navy Hospitalman Edward Yelland, a lab technician, taking McCaffery’s forehead temperature before the Assistant Secretary entered the center.

Army Capt. Zachary Albright, the center’s officer-in-charge, had the center’s impressive blood product collection numbers at the ready and offered an overview of operations before Army Maj. (Dr.) Benjamin Cook, the medical director for Transfusion Services, gave McCaffery a blast of chilly air from the center’s deep freezers.

According to the National Institutes of Health, in order to retain viability, plasma must be frozen at subzero temperatures.

After a look at the processing area and an introduction to the tri-service staff, McCaffery was shown the apheresis room where he was able to see Steve Christodoulou, an apheresis nurse, and Frank Wake, a phlebotomist, attending to a COVID-19 convalescent plasma donor.

Within that plasma reside antibodies – proteins that the immune system produces in response to infection.

Convalescent plasma has been used for nearly a century to transfer antibodies from a recovered person to help protect another from an infection. In that time, there has been some evidence that there has been benefit against rabies, hepatitis B, polio, measles, influenza, Ebola and other pathogens. Small case studies have also shown that during previous coronavirus outbreaks of Middle East respiratory syndrome and severe acute respiratory syndrome, known as MERS and SARS, respectively, the use of convalescent plasma was both safe and helpful in clearing the virus faster.

COVID-19 is the disease caused by the virus known as SARS-CoV2, which is a coronavirus.

“It is important for people to donate,” said Guzman. “It’s helping lives.”

Beyond speeding the clearance of the virus, McCaffery also sees expanded possibilities in the plasma’s use.

“We believe there is potential for this plasma to ultimately be converted into another treatment that can be used as a preventive measure, or be used for somebody who has been exposed to COVID and can get this as treatment to prevent the further development of the virus,” McCaffery said.

Many people may be familiar with typical blood donation. The apheresis process takes longer, roughly 45 minutes, but is no more complicated for the donor. The center has lounge chairs, reading material, televisions and movies and no shortage of snacks. The staff ensures that it has all the favorites of regular donors on hand to make them as comfortable as possible.

“People can donate several ways – through apheresis or through whole blood,” said Guzman. “People can offer their blood, their life-saving product and help out people in need.”

To learn more about the Military Health System’s Convalescent Plasma Collection Program, visit https://go.usa.gov/xf8h5. For more info on donating, visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil.

You also may be interested in...

Military nurses hold virtual research & evidence-based practice course

Article
10/30/2020
Two nurses, wearing masks, examining a mannequin

Due to the COVID-19 national emergency, the three-day in-person course was abbreviated to a one-day virtual.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Public Health | Combat Support | Research and Innovation

‘Virtual Ward’ pilot program to reduce hospital stay time

Article
10/30/2020
Man's arm with blood pressure cuff and fingertip pulse oximeter

"The idea is that instead of staying in hospital longer..., patients are released early and can recover in the comfort and privacy of their homes."

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Technology | Coronavirus | Public Health

COVID-19 amplifies importance of Trusted Care culture

Article
10/29/2020
Image of soldier holding up a badge that says "Trusted Care."

The goal is to create a team of innovators focused on patient safety.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

JBLM hosts vital blood drive during COVID-19

Article
10/29/2020
Soldier giving blood

To maintain social distancing requirements, all blood drives are by appointment only.

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program | Public Health | Coronavirus

WRNMMC expands innovation and opens new, permanent drive-thru pharmacy

Article
10/23/2020
Military pharmacist, wearing a mask, looking at bags of prescriptions

The new Prescription Drive-Thru Pick-up will operate similarly as the curbside pharmacy pick-up.

Recommended Content:

Research and Innovation | Combat Support | Public Health | Coronavirus | Health Literacy Month 2020

Updated Guidance for Performing Temperature Checks at Military MTFs and DTFs

Publication
10/21/2020

This guidance is an update to Defense Health Agency Return to Full Operations Concept of Operations, V5.0 (June 12, 2020) as it pertains to temperature checks in MTFs and DTFs. Based on recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), previous guidance directed MTFs to take the temperature of all individuals entering the facility. Effective immediately, temperature checks are not required; however, screening of individuals entering MTFs and DTFs and healthcare personnel on duty in the MTF or DTF is to continue.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

Fort Irwin DENTAC strives to reach readiness perfection

Article
10/21/2020
Image of patient getting a dental exam

To accommodate an entire installation, the dental clinic extended its hours.

Recommended Content:

Public Health | Coronavirus | MHS GENESIS | Combat Support

Specialized robots used to disinfect NH TwentyninePalms

Article
10/21/2020
Hospital personnel standing with a cleaning robot

The robotic units are designed to complement manual cleaning.

Recommended Content:

Public Health | Coronavirus

Navy pharmacy techs support COVID-19 and MHS GENESIS efforts

Article
10/20/2020
Navy personnel in a pharmacy

Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Aaron Souders is highlighted for his work as a Navy pharmacy technician.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | MHS GENESIS | Combat Support

Navy tele-health supports Guam civilian hospital during COVID-19

Article
10/19/2020
Woman sitting in front of several computer monitors

[T]his is the first-ever DoD tasking for telemedicine support in response to a request from civil authorities for aid.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Combat Support | Global Health Engagement

Navy unit provided COVID-19 support to Peruvian First Responders

Article
10/16/2020
Fireman getting COVID test in firehouse garage

The province of Callao has the second highest number of COVID-19 cases in Peru.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Global Health Engagement

COVID-19 Social Media Toolkit

Publication
10/16/2020

These messages are provided for you to use on your platforms with any of the images from the COVID-19 Toolkit.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

DoD COVID-19 Practice Management Guide Version 6

Technical Document
10/16/2020

This Practice Management Guide does not supersede DoD Policy. It is based upon the best information available at the time of publication. It is designed to provide information and assist decision making. It is not intended to define a standard of care and should not be construed as one. Neither should it be interpreted as prescribing an exclusive course of management. It was developed by experts in this field. Variations in practice will inevitably and appropriately occur when clinicians take into account the needs of individual patients, available resources, and limitations unique to an institution or type of practice. Every healthcare professional making use of this guideline is responsible for evaluating the appropriateness of applying it in the setting of any particular clinical situation. The Practice Management Guide is not intended to represent TRICARE policy. Further, inclusion of recommendations for specific testing and/or therapeutic interventions within this guide does not guarantee coverage of civilian sector care. Additional information on current TRICARE benefits may be found at www.tricare.mil or by contacting your regional TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

DHA Director outlines how MHS standardization bolsters reform

Article
10/15/2020
Two soldiers in masks, talking

How COVID-19 repositioned the best laid plans of the DoD.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Joint Health Information Exchange | MHS GENESIS | MHS Transformation

Annual flu vaccine remains a health priority during COVID-19 era

Article
10/13/2020
Military personnel getting flu shot

Annual vaccine is a covered TRICARE benefit.

Recommended Content:

Immunization Healthcare | Vaccine-Preventable Diseases | Public Health | Coronavirus
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 19

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.