Back to Top Skip to main content

DoD reiterates FDA warning on using some hand sanitizers

Three men in PPE examining bottles of hand sanitzer Crane Army Ammunition Activity employees examine bottled hand sanitizer prior to a 10-hour isolation before shipment. Crane Army was able to quickly and effectively meet the U.S. Army’s need and assembled a hand sanitizer production line in just a few weeks. Crane Army’s mission is to provide conventional munitions support for U.S. Army and Joint Force readiness. It is one of 17 installations of the Joint Munitions Command and one of 23 organic industrial bases under the U.S. Army Materiel Command, which include arsenals, depots, activities and ammunition plants. (Photo by Mallory Haag, Crane Army Ammunition Activity.)

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

With the increased use of hand sanitizers, the Safety Office at Fort Jackson, South Carolina is urging the community to be safe when using hand sanitizers.

Gel hand sanitizers are flammable and consumers must be aware of their surroundings when using them.

According to a Federal Drug Administration bulletin distributed by the safety office, “an employee at Department of Energy Federal Contractors Group used an alcohol-based hand sanitizer as advised by hygiene recommendations. Shortly after the application to his hands, but before the liquid disinfectant had evaporated and completely dried, the employee touched a metal surface which accumulated a static electrical charge, resulting in an ignition source. The ethyl-alcohol based disinfectant flashed, resulting in an almost invisible blue flame on both hands.”

Ron Ross, safety manager with Fort Jackon’s Installation Safety Office urged the community to take extra care because “any incident is one too many.”

“We can never be too cautious, please exercise vigilance when using these gel sanitizers to ensure it is completely evaporated before touching any metal object and or other items that often harbor static electricity,” he said.

The FDA also reiterated in a July 23 news release its warning against using certain hand sanitizers that contain methanol.

The release states the FDA “continues to warn consumers and health care professionals not to use certain alcohol-based hand sanitizers due to the dangerous presence of methanol, or wood alcohol – a substance often used to create fuel and antifreeze that can be toxic when absorbed through the skin as well as life-threatening when ingested.”

Methanol exposure can result in nausea, vomiting, headache, blurred vision, permanent blindness, seizures, coma, and permanent damage to the nervous system or death.

The full FDA release can be found at: https://www.fda.gov/news-events/press-announcements/coronavirus-covid-19-update-fda-reiterates-warning-about-dangerous-alcohol-based-hand-sanitizers.

The latest FDA hand sanitizer update can be found at: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/drug-safety-and-availability/fda-updates-hand-sanitizers-consumers-should-not-use.

You also may be interested in...

DHA's new app assists providers with treating infectious diseases

Article
7/10/2020
Medical personnel putting gloves on

This progressive web application provides faster updates to content and function than traditional apps.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Connected Health

For some, working from home brings neck and back pain

Article
7/10/2020
Chiropractor adjusting another man's back

"[T]he most common complaint of teleworkers is neck and upper back pain between the shoulder blades."

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Public Health

Convalescent Plasma Donation PSA featuring Lt. General Place

Video
7/10/2020
Image of Lt. Gen Place

Lt. Gen Place asks servicemembers DoD-wide to consider dontating plasma in the fight against COVID-19.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Convalescent Plasma Collection Program | Armed Services Blood Program

Defending the Homeland: New Invention Helps Protect Healthcare Workers During COVID-19 Pandemic

Article
7/9/2020
Image of medical personnel in hospital room

"[T]he team realized that while the CAMIC would function well for tracheostomy, its true use would be for intubation..."

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Research and Innovation

Defending the Homeland: Fort Knox Safety Official Donates COVID-19 Convalescent Plasma to Help Others

Article
7/8/2020
Woman sitting in chair giving blood

[T]he process involves a machine that uses three bags to collect and separate the plasma from the blood.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Convalescent Plasma Collection Program

Summer’s here – stay safe!

Article
7/8/2020
Image of Coast Guard employee talking with man on boat

Remember these tips while enjoying the summer

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Public Health | Summer Safety | Total Force Fitness

Combat stress techniques help military providers during COVID pandemic

Article
7/6/2020
Image of soldier in a hazmat suit with a medical-grade mask

6 steps to get medical team members back in the fight

Recommended Content:

Combat Support | Coronavirus

U.S. Naval Hospital Guam Collects Convalescent Plasma from Sailors

Article
7/2/2020
Technician takes notes next to convalescent plasma samples.

The CCP is the liquid part of blood from patients who have recovered from an infection.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Convalescent Plasma Collection Program

Pentagon leaders brief department's COVID-19 response to reporters

Article
7/2/2020
Three men sit at blue table with American Flag and Pentagon symbol behind them.

The COVID-19 pandemic affects each area of the nation differently. Local leaders at military installations decide protocols for public safety on a case-by-case basis. The Military Health System supports those leaders by providing health surveillance data, updated to reflect current information.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

Confronting the Coronavirus and Countering Complacency

Article
7/2/2020
Masked Navy members consult clipboard.

Call it the COVID-19 complacency conundrum.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Convalescent Plasma Collection Program

Supplemental Guidance 10 for Military Medical Treatment Facilities and Military Dental Treatment Facilities Directors in regards to Coronavirus Disease 2019

Publication
7/1/2020

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

BAMC Change of Command 2020

Article
7/1/2020
Two masked soldier display an award in front of flags.

Army Brig. Gen. (Dr.) Wendy Harter, the first female commander in Brooke Army Medical Center’s history, turned over command to Army Brig. Gen. (Dr.) Shan Bagby, the first African American commander in BAMC’s history during a June 26 change of command ceremony at Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus

COVID-19 leads to innovation in military health care practices

Article
7/1/2020
Man in lab coat and mask prepares sample for COVID-19 testing.

MHS thinks outside of the box to bring care to patients during pandemic

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Research and Innovation

Summer PCS plans altered by COVID-19

Article
6/29/2020
Man wearing mask loading boxes into a car

Service members and families have suggestions to keep you safe.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Summer Safety

How the military stays ready during disease outbreaks

Article
6/29/2020
Headshot of Dr. Sanchez

A Q&A with a health surveillance professional at Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Coronavirus
<< < ... 16 17 18 19 20  ... > >> 
Showing results 241 - 255 Page 17 of 28

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.