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Air Force opens Intrepid Spirit Center at Eglin AFB

Image of Soldiers holding a long ribbon and cutting it. Air Force Brig. Gen. Scott Cain, 96th Test Wing commander, and Team Eglin leaders cut a red, white and blue ribbon to mark the opening of Eglin’s Intrepid Spirit Center. The EISC was a donation from the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund to the Department of Defense. It is the first on an Air Force base and the eighth of 10 located on military installations nationwide. (Photo by Ilka Cole, Eglin Air Force Base.)

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In late August, Eglin Air Force Base in Florida opened the doors to a new Intrepid Spirit Center, the first for any Air Force base. An ISC serves as a dedicated medical treatment center to help active duty service members who are experiencing post-traumatic stress, traumatic brain injury, associated pain conditions, and psychological injuries.

Air Force Brig. Gen. Scott Cain, 96th Test Wing commander explained how the ISC effort took years of vision led by patriotic citizens, military leaders and the Air Force’s Invisible Wounds Initiative.

At the dedication ceremony, Cain stated, “I want to tell everybody how proud I am for Eglin AFB to host the Air Force’s first ISC. This culmination and capability is what we are celebrating here today and rolling out for our service members.”

The Eglin Intrepid Spirit Center, or EISC, represents the blending of the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund mission and the Air Forces Invisible Wounds Initiative, which recognized the need for a medical facility dedicated to invisible wounds.

When the Air Force broke ground on the Invisible Wounds Center in 2018, Arnold Fisher, Honorary Chairman of the IFHF, offered to build an Intrepid Spirit Center at Eglin.

“The ISC is our commitment to treating those with wounds from service and our dedication to providing service members the opportunity to continue their service to the nation,” said Cain.  

Air Force Chief of Staff, Air Force Gen. Charles Brown, provided virtual remarks on the milestone moment and acknowledged that invisible wounds take a toll on our airmen, soldiers, sailors, Marines, Space Force professionals and their families.

“When they are injured in the line of duty we will support their medical needs and we will see them to a better tomorrow,” said Brown. “The ISC building will bring first class care and is an enduring expression of our gratitude, love and commitment to taking care of our wounded warriors.”

Throughout the week virtual videos appeared on IFHF social media highlighting the new facility, the therapists, its state-of-art capabilities and Eglin heroes with a connection to the Intrepid Spirit Center.

Eglin’s ISC is unique from other ISCs in that it’s the only center with an interventional pain suite which contains top-of-the-line x-ray and ultrasound equipment, a dedicated intervention pain physician and team. In addition, Eglin is also the first ISC to use a kiln for art therapy and the first to have a dedicated chapel and chaplain to address spiritual healing.

“The permanent nature of this facility represents our unyielding commitment to providing world class medical care to you and that we’re here for you for as long as it takes,” said Brown.

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