Back to Top Skip to main content

Air Force opens Intrepid Spirit Center at Eglin AFB

Soldiers holding a long ribbon and cutting it Air Force Brig. Gen. Scott Cain, 96th Test Wing commander, and Team Eglin leaders cut a red, white and blue ribbon to mark the opening of Eglin’s Intrepid Spirit Center. The EISC was a donation from the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund to the Department of Defense. It is the first on an Air Force base and the eighth of 10 located on military installations nationwide. (Photo by Ilka Cole, Eglin Air Force Base.)

Recommended Content:

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Traumatic Brain Injury

In late August, Eglin Air Force Base in Florida opened the doors to a new Intrepid Spirit Center, the first for any Air Force base. An ISC serves as a dedicated medical treatment center to help active duty service members who are experiencing post-traumatic stress, traumatic brain injury, associated pain conditions, and psychological injuries.

Air Force Brig. Gen. Scott Cain, 96th Test Wing commander explained how the ISC effort took years of vision led by patriotic citizens, military leaders and the Air Force’s Invisible Wounds Initiative.

At the dedication ceremony, Cain stated, “I want to tell everybody how proud I am for Eglin AFB to host the Air Force’s first ISC. This culmination and capability is what we are celebrating here today and rolling out for our service members.”

The Eglin Intrepid Spirit Center, or EISC, represents the blending of the Intrepid Fallen Heroes Fund mission and the Air Forces Invisible Wounds Initiative, which recognized the need for a medical facility dedicated to invisible wounds.

When the Air Force broke ground on the Invisible Wounds Center in 2018, Arnold Fisher, Honorary Chairman of the IFHF, offered to build an Intrepid Spirit Center at Eglin.

“The ISC is our commitment to treating those with wounds from service and our dedication to providing service members the opportunity to continue their service to the nation,” said Cain.  

Air Force Chief of Staff, Air Force Gen. Charles Brown, provided virtual remarks on the milestone moment and acknowledged that invisible wounds take a toll on our airmen, soldiers, sailors, Marines, Space Force professionals and their families.

“When they are injured in the line of duty we will support their medical needs and we will see them to a better tomorrow,” said Brown. “The ISC building will bring first class care and is an enduring expression of our gratitude, love and commitment to taking care of our wounded warriors.”

Throughout the week virtual videos appeared on IFHF social media highlighting the new facility, the therapists, its state-of-art capabilities and Eglin heroes with a connection to the Intrepid Spirit Center.

Eglin’s ISC is unique from other ISCs in that it’s the only center with an interventional pain suite which contains top-of-the-line x-ray and ultrasound equipment, a dedicated intervention pain physician and team. In addition, Eglin is also the first ISC to use a kiln for art therapy and the first to have a dedicated chapel and chaplain to address spiritual healing.

“The permanent nature of this facility represents our unyielding commitment to providing world class medical care to you and that we’re here for you for as long as it takes,” said Brown.

You also may be interested in...

Seizures among Active Component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2007 – 2016

Infographic
1/25/2018
This retrospective study estimated the rates of seizures diagnosed among deployed and non-deployed service members to identify factors associated with seizures and determine if seizure rates differed in deployment settings. It also attempted to evaluate the associations between seizures, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by assessing correlations between the incidence rates of seizures and prior diagnoses of TBI and PTSD. Seizures have been defined as paroxysmal neurologic episodes caused by abnormal neuronal activity in the brain. Approximately one in 10 individuals will experience a seizure in their lifetime. Line graph 1: Annual crude incidence rates of seizures among non-deployed service members, active component, U.S. Armed Forces data •	A total of 16,257 seizure events of all types were identified among non-deployed service members during the 10-year surveillance period. •	The overall incidence rate was 12.9 seizures per 10,000 person-years (p-yrs.) •	There was a decrease in the rate of seizures diagnosed in the active component of the military during the 10-year period. Rates reached their lowest point in 2015 – 9.0 seizures per 10,000 p-yrs. •	Annual rates were markedly higher among service members with recent PTSD and TBI diagnoses, and among those with prior seizure diagnoses. Line graph 2: Annual crude incidence rates of seizures by traumatic brain injury (TBI) and recent post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis among non-deployed active component service members, U.S. Armed Forces •	For service members who had received both TBI and PTSD diagnoses, seizure rates among the deployed and the non-deployed were two and three times the rates among those with only one of those diagnoses, respectively. •	Rates of seizures tended to be higher among service members who were: in the Army or Marine Corps, Female, African American, Younger than age 30, Veterans of no more than one previous deployment, and in the occupations of combat arms, armor, or healthcare Line graph 3: Annual crude incidence rates of seizures diagnosed among service members deployed to Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, or Operation New Dawn, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008 – 2016  •	A total of 814 cases of seizures were identified during deployment to operations in Iraq and Afghanistan during the 9-year surveillance period (2008 – 2016). •	For deployed service members, the overall incidence rate was 9.1 seizures per 10,000 p-yrs. •	Having either a TBI or recent PTSD diagnosis alone was associated with a 3-to 4-fold increase in the rate of seizures. •	Only 19 cases of seizures were diagnosed among deployed individuals with a recent PTSD diagnosis during the 9-year surveillance period. •	Overall incidence rates among deployed service members were highest for those in the Army, females, those younger than age 25, junior enlisted, and in healthcare occupations. Access the full report in the December 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No. 12). Go to www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic documents a retrospective study which estimated the rates of seizures diagnosed among deployed and non-deployed service members to identify factors associated with seizures and determine if seizure rates differed in deployment settings. The study also evaluated the associations between seizures, traumatic brain injury (TBI), and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) by assessing correlations between the incidence rates of seizures and prior diagnoses of TBI and PTSD.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Diagnoses of Traumatic Brain Injury Not Clearly Associated with Deployment, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001 – 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is structural alteration of the brain or physiological disruption of brain function caused by an external force.  TBI, particularly mild TBI or concussion, is the most common traumatic injury in the U.S. military. This analysis provides the estimated rates of incident TBIs among service members before their first-ever deployment as well as separately among service members during deployments/ after deployments. It also mentions factors that may explain why the TBI incidence rates among the previously deployed were higher than those of the never-deployed group. Moreover, it describes the demographic and military traits of service members diagnosed as TBI cases (before/after deployment). Categorization of person time during surveillance period included four categories: Group 1 (Never deployed/TBI before first-ever deployment), Group 2 (Currently deployed or within 30 days of return), Group 3 (previously deployed but not currently deployed nor within 30 days of return) and Censored after Diagnosis of TBI. From 2001-2016, 276,858 active component service members received first-time diagnoses of TBI. The crude overall incidence rate of TBI among deployed service members was 1.5 times that of service members assigned to Group 1 and 1.2 times that of service members in Group 3 during the surveillance period.  Total TBI cases by group were Group 1 42.8%, Group 2 13.2% and Group 3 44.0%. Incidence rates by group (per 100,000 person-years) were Group 1 1,141.3, Group 2 1,690.5, and Group 3 1,451.2. Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR and see fact sheets at www.Health.mil/AFHSB

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is structural alteration of the brain or physiological disruption of brain function caused by an external force. TBI, particularly mild TBI or concussion, is the most common traumatic injury in the U.S. military. This analysis provides the estimated rates of incident TBIs among service members before their first-ever deployment as well as separately among service members during deployments/ after deployments. It also mentions factors that may explain why the TBI incidence rates among the previously deployed were higher than those of the never-deployed group. Moreover, it describes the demographic and military traits of service members diagnosed as TBI cases (before/after deployment).

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury
Showing results 1 - 2 Page 1 of 1

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.