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PSNS Hospitalman consistently steps up to meet the mission

Man wearing a mask in an office environment Hospitalman Kevin Stout, assigned to Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Bremerton Detachment Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), was recently recognized by the shipyard’s leadership for performing flawlessly under pressure, conducting a contaminated person drill as part of the overall Radiation Health audit. (Photo by Douglas H Stutz, NHB/NMRTC Bremerton public affairs officer.)

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Like many corpsman in the Navy, Hospitalman Kevin Stout holds down many jobs to keep his facility afloat. Stout, a trained laboratory technician, is assigned to Navy Medicine Readiness and Training Command Bremerton Detachment Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS). In addition to is primary billet, he also serves as a pharmacy technician, hazardous waste manager, phlebotomist and COVID-19 screener.

Stout currently handles such duties as providing acute care, working as a laboratory technician and helping with the clinic’s Occupational Health program - the largest of its kind in the Department of the Navy.

He also recently took part in the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery (BUMED) Radiation Health audit that resulted in zero discrepancies for the third year in a row. This is considered a remarkable achievement due to it being the largest radiation health program in DoD.

The ‘Rad Health’ program is cited as the ‘gold standard’ by Naval Sea Systems Command and BUMED audits. And Stout was recognized by the shipyard’s leadership for performing flawlessly under pressure, conducting a contaminated person drill as part of the overall Radiation Health audit.

“I was [providing] corpsman coverage during the Contaminated Injured Person Assessment. It was my job to ensure overall safety and medical stability of the casualty,” said Stout. “The drill was a simulation of a radiation contaminated injury. I responded to a contaminated laceration on the hand. Medical takes priority in these kinds of situations. I quickly assessed the patient and got the bleeding under control. At that point, the very capable Radiation Health team and I started the decontamination process by cleaning the injury to ensure all contaminates were off or out of the patient.”

The PSNS Radiation Health Division was very impressed by Stout’s emergency medical response in the simulated drill scenario, as well as his demonstration of the strong working relationship between the clinic and the shipyard.

“We were able to show the worker our care for his well-being and get him the help he needs efficiently. I think working as a team shows every worker in the shipyard they’re safe at their job and will receive the highest quality of care,” explained Stout, adding that his Navy training has prepare him to handle such scenarios.

“I have trained a good amount for these kinds of situations. The drill can get complicated if we are not communicating with each other or if we spread the contamination,” continued Stout,

"The most important elements demonstrated and shared during such a drill were clinical expertise, composure and professionalism,” Stout remarked. “With the added restrictions in place due to COVID-19, I would say the most challenging was being able to see out of my glasses while I was wearing a mask and face shield.”

As has been the case for the past six-plus months, Stout has also been directly involved in helping to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. “With the added restrictions in place due to COVID-19, I would say the most challenging was being able to see out of my glasses while I was wearing a mask and face shield.”

“My fellow corpsmen and I have screened every single person as they walk through the clinic entrance and take part in cleaning the entire building multiple times a day,” Stout explained. “Any civilian that comes in for work-related injuries is screened to see if they need light duty or can return to work. My job is to ensure that our shipyard workers are getting the best treatment to continue performing their jobs on the various projects going on in the shipyard,” explained Stout.

Hailing from Redding, California, Stout became interested in a Navy Medicine career for job security. “We always need medical care and law enforcement. I’ve always been interested in the medical field and this was a good opportunity.” Since joining four years ago his Navy journey has taken him to San Antonio, Texas; Portsmouth, Virginia and Camp Pendleton, California.

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