Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Army SHARP/SAPR’s awareness creates a safe culture at JBLE

Image of teal ribbon against soldier's uniform. Click to open a larger version of the image. The teal ribbon is a national symbol of support for victims of sexual assault, and is used by the Army’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention (SHARP) Program, and its Air Force counterpart, the Sexual Assault and Prevention Response (SAPR) Program at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia in Sept. The SHARP and SAPR teams at JBLE conduct training to spread awareness about one of the most sensitive issues within the military, and provide recovery support for victims of sexual assault. (Illustration by AIR Force Staff Sgt. Don Hudson.)

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | Sexual Trauma

As social distancing remains the new normal, online training is becoming a vital tool for many organizations.

The Army’s Sexual Harassment/Assault Response and Prevention, or SHARP program, and its Air Force counterpart, the Sexual Assault and Prevention Response or SAPR program, developed new solutions to spread awareness about one of the most sensitive issues within the military.

Implementing Department of Defense, Army, and Air Force zero-tolerance policies regarding sexual harassment and sexual assault, the SHARP and SAPR teams work to provide a culture of support and safety for all at Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia.

With assistance from the Ft. Eustis SHARP office, Army Sgt. 1st Class Jesse Johnson, 597th Transportation Brigade sexual assault response coordinator, has worked with his team to bring innovative live online training events to JBLE. The online trainings have featured an advocate poet, guest speakers, and an audience participation theater group, Pure Praxis.

“SHARP training is conducted face-to-face primarily, and in small groups,” said Johnson. “Because of COVID-19 restrictions, this could not be accomplished. We were innovative in our approach to keep the program and its importance at the forefront by creating virtual training opportunities.”

Each of the online trainings conducted by the Fort Eustis SHARP team were open to all soldiers, sailors, airmen, and Marines on the installation, and each session brought in over 200 viewers. The trainings focused on proactive approaches to sexual harassment and assault prevention and gave viewers knowledge for identifying actions and trends that can lead to a corrosive and unsafe culture.

To overcome the challenges of social distancing, the SAPR team on Langley Air Force Base has been providing four trainings a month to Air Force personnel via virtual classrooms and, upon request, face-to-face training for units that can provide a safe social distancing environment.

The SHARP and SAPR teams use various programs to bring learning platforms to all levels within the DoD. Trainings include realistic skits, group scenarios, exercises, case studies, surveys, and data from incidents to provide troops and civilian employees at JBLE with the practical knowledge and understanding needed to create a positive culture within their own units and work sections.

While teaching awareness is an important role of the SHARP and SAPR teams, their top priority is to provide a one-stop place for victims who seek answers, resources, and support from a community of people dedicated to help in reporting and recovery.

“Due to COVID, we were unable to hold our regular awareness events for Sexual Assault Prevention Month in April,” said Scottie Hampton, SAPR victim advocate. “But we are able to continue providing care for anyone in need with electronic reporting, telehealth counseling, and face-to-face when requested.”

The SHARP and SAPR teams provide 24/7 access to reporting and recovery services and resources. Working on the front lines of these services are the victim advocates like Hampton, and Sexual Assault Response Coordinators like Johnson, and dedicated volunteers who train JBLE team members on sexual assault prevention and reporting practices, and help survivors through the reporting and recovery process.

For more information, please visit the SHARP webpage, the SAPR webpage, or the JBLE SAPR page on Facebook.

You also may be interested in...

Future of Nursing: Telehealth, More Innovation and Maybe Some Robots

Article
5/13/2022
Second Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron operating room nurse, briefs Col. Debra Lovette, 81st Training Wing commander, and other base leadership on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at the Keesler Medical Center June 16, 2017. (Photo: Kemberly Groue, U.S. Air Force)

The future of nursing is here due in part to changes brought by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recommended Content:

Nursing in the Military Health System | Coronavirus

How One Military Nurse Persevered Through the COVID-19 Response

Article
5/5/2022
Air Force Capt. Courtney Ebeling, a medical-surgical nurse at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph Family Health Clinic, Texas, was deployed to support the COVID-19 response in Afghanistan in 2021. They administered vaccinations to U.S. citizens, service members, and foreign military members as well as supported the preparation to withdraw from the country. (Photo: Courtesy of Air Force Capt. Courtney Ebeling)

Nurses across the Military Health System have played a vital role in providing routine patient care and meeting the needs of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recommended Content:

Nurses Week Toolkit: United In Service, Rooted in Strength | Coronavirus | Nursing in the Military Health System

‘I Love the Intensity’ – One Nurse Recalls Three COVID-19 Deployments

Article
5/5/2022
In 2020, Air Force 1st Lt. Tiffany Parra, an ICU nurse at the 633rd Medical Group, on Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, was deployed to a North Dakota hospital to support a FEMA COVID-19 mission. In the photo, she trains on equipment used for critical patients in a North Dakota ICU. (Photo: Courtesy of Air Force 1st Lt. Tiffany Parra)

Nurses are unique, they follow a calling to care for others. Military nurses do that as well as serve their nation. For Nurses Week, the MHS highlights some of their own.

Recommended Content:

Nurses Week Toolkit: United In Service, Rooted in Strength | Nursing in the Military Health System | Coronavirus

Pandemic Spotlights the Vital Role of Military Lab Workers

Article
5/2/2022
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley Solomon, 18th Medical Support Squadron NCO in charge of microbiology, unloads blood samples from a centrifuge at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Jan. 31, 2019. (Photo: Tech. Sgt. Matthew B. Fredericks, U.S. Air Force)

MHS clinical labs produce results.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus

Helping Your Child to Cope with Grief and Losses Related to COVID-19

Article
4/28/2022
Shirley Lanham Elementary School students perform Taiko drumming during a Month of the Military Child celebration aboard the Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan, April 6, 2022. (Photo: Petty Officer 2nd Class Ange-Olivier Clement, Naval Air Facility Atsugi)

Many military children have lost loved ones to COVID-19. How parents can help with the grief.

Recommended Content:

Month of the Military Child - Celebrating Military Kids | Children's Health | Psychological Fitness | Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus

Lt. Gen. Place Addresses Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention

Video
4/27/2022
Lt. Gen. Place Addresses Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention

Lt. Gen. Ron Place, DHA Director, talks about the importance of speaking up against sexual assault and his zero-tolerance policy regarding sexual assault in DHA workplaces and our hospitals and clinics.

Recommended Content:

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month | Sexual Trauma

How to Help Military Children Reconnect After Two Years of the Pandemic

Article
4/25/2022
Airman 1st Class Rocio Romo, Space Launch Delta 30 public affairs specialist, and her son pose for a photo at Cocheo Park on Vandenberg Space Force Base, California, March 25, 2022. During the month of April, we celebrate Month of the Military Child to highlight the sacrifices military children make on the home front while their parents serve the United States. (Photo: Airman Kadielle Shaw, Space Launch Delta 30 Public Affairs)

How parents can help children stressed by more than two years of COVID-19.

Recommended Content:

Month of the Military Child - Celebrating Military Kids | Children's Health | Psychological Fitness | Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus

COVID-19 Booster Effectiveness Remained High During Omicron Surge

Article
4/18/2022
Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Mary Ashcraft, assigned to the combat ship USS Tulsa, administers a COVID-19 vaccine booster to Aviation Machinist Mate 1st Class Anthony Johnson Jan. 10, 2022, at Apra Harbor, Guam. (Photo: Mass Communication Specialist Petty Officer 1st Class Devin M. Langer, Command Destroyer Squadron 7)

Two new studies of active-duty service members show COVID-19 booster vaccines are effective, but uptake rates in the military community lagged behind the civilian population.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts

How my sexual assault shaped me but did not break me

Article Around MHS
4/18/2022
Air Force Staff Sgt. Kayla White

Joining the military was an intense, transformational experience filled with rites of passage, experiences designed to prepare me to act as a member of a team and conform so I could truly commit to something bigger than myself. One unexpected and devastating experience during my initial training changed me forever.

Recommended Content:

Sexual Trauma | Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month

8 Tips to Help Kids Adjust to Change during the New Pandemic Phase

Article
4/15/2022
A parent comforts his child while she receives a pediatric dose of the COVID-19 vaccine at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Jan. 28, 2022. (Photo: Airman 1st Class Anna Nolte, 18th Wing Public Affairs)

Parents should prepare their kids for the new normal of the ongoing pandemic, recognizing that the status of the disease can change quickly as new variants of COVID-19 emerge.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus | Children's Health

Got Your 6 | April 16, 2022

Video
4/15/2022
Got Your 6 | April 16, 2022

‘Got Your 6’ is TRICARE’s COVID vaccine video series that delivers important information and updates, on days that end in ‘6.’ It includes the latest information about DOD vaccine distribution, the TRICARE health benefit, and vaccine availability. Got a question about ‘Got Your 6’? Send an email to dha.ncr.comm.mbx.dha-internal-communications@mail.mil Find your local military provider at tricare.mil/MTF, or go to tricare.mil/vaccineappointments and schedule yours today!

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts

SAFE Option Provides Care for Victims of Sexual Violence

Article
4/14/2022
(From left) Evangeline Barefoot, Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Forensic Healthcare program manager shows Dr. Cynthia Tara Ferguson, Defense Health Agency Forensic Healthcare program director, protocols BACH follows for patients who come to the hospital after experiencing sexual violence. Barefoot said some victims may avoid medical treatment because they don’t want to report an assault, however seeking medical treatment does not obligate a service member to file an investigation or notify their command. (Photo: Maria Christina Yager)

A special medical exam, called a Sexual Assault Forensic Examination, SAFE, is available to survivors of sexual violence preserves lasting evidence that may aid in the prosecution of a perpetrator of sexual assault.

Recommended Content:

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month | Sexual Trauma

SAAPM: Safe Helpline

Infographic
4/8/2022
SAAPM: Safe Helpline

If you have experienced sexual assault, help is available. Contact the DOD Safe Helpline at 877-995-5247 to receive anonymous and confidential support and obtain information on your reporting options. #SAAPM #SexualAssault #PreventAssault #StepForward https://safehelpline.org/

Recommended Content:

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month | Sexual Trauma

SAAPM Be There

Infographic
4/8/2022
SAAPM Be There

It takes courage for anyone to report a sexual assault. Be there to help someone and you can make a real difference. www.Safehelpline.org, 877-995-5247 #SAAPM #SexualAssault #PreventAssault #TreatmentCanHelp #StepForward

Recommended Content:

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month | Sexual Trauma

Anyone Can Experience Sexual Assault

Infographic
4/8/2022
Anyone Can Experience Sexual Assault

All members of the military community deserve to work and live in a respectful, inclusive environment while serving our nation. Anyone can experience sexual assault or hazing that crosses the line. It takes courage for anyone to report sexual assault. Learn more at the DOD Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office Men’s SAPR Campaign site: https://www.sapr.mil/mens-sapr-campaign #SAAPM #SexualAssault #PreventAssault #TreatmentCanHelp #StepForward

Recommended Content:

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention Month | Sexual Trauma
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 32

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.