Back to Top Skip to main content

Weed ACH holds Pregnancy & Infant Loss Awareness month event

Group of people standing outside hospital Fort Irwin community members attend a remembrance ceremony on October 15 at Weed Army Community Hospital at Fort Irwin, Calif. during a Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month event. (Photo by Kimberly Hackbarth, Weed Army Community Hospital.)

Recommended Content:

Children's Health | Women's Health

Earlier this month, the Weed Army Community Hospital at Fort Irwin, California hosted Light the Night, a Pregnancy and Infant Loss Awareness month remembrance event.

Army Sgt. Monique Knox, a preventive medicine noncommissioned officer at Weed ACH, spearheaded the planning for the event and said it's important to acknowledge pregnancy and infant loss awareness events because it isn’t healthy for families to suffer in silence.

“It is strong and brave to be vulnerable and release that pressure and pain of your little loved one's life lost before it eats away at you until you are no good to help anyone else,” she explained.

Weed ACH staff set up a table with educational resources for families and a memorial frame where parents could write the name of their baby on a little wooden heart and place it in the frame that will be displayed at the hospital entrance the rest of the month.

During the event, Army 1st Lt. Tiffany Mendez, a registered nurse with Weed ACH, shared her story of loss.

Mendez had just arrived to her first duty station in Germany when she found out she was pregnant with her first child.

However, at one of the first routine checkups, she and her husband received the news that no parent wants to hear.

“The ultrasound technician informed us there was no longer a heartbeat,” she said.

After that, Mendez said she buried her emotions and tried to rationalize why she didn’t deserve to feel so sad.

“I always compared my loss to other people who had a loss maybe at birth or in the third trimester and it was like my pain wasn’t as great as them …I don’t need to make it that big of a deal,” she said. “But now looking back, I realize I shouldn’t have done that.”

Her pain unearthed 16 years later when she started working at Weed ACH and cared for someone in a similar situation.

“As a nurse I found myself caring for a young mother in her first trimester who had lost her first pregnancy,” she said. “Those feelings didn’t really come back until then, when I saw her in the spot that I was in 16 years ago.”

Mendez empathized with the grieving parents who thanked her for sharing her story with them.

“I realized how powerful that was just to face it and share my story and that was important,” said Mendez.

The Weed ACH event where Mendez spoke about her experience gave families an opportunity to share their grief with others who had similar loss and create a safe environment to remember those lost.

“This is the first [a pregnancy and infant loss awareness] event I’ve ever been to,” Mendez said. “It took me 16 years to acknowledge it and I think it’s about time.”

You also may be interested in...

Pregnancies and live births among female service members

Infographic
12/21/2017
Women have been able to serve officially in the U.S. military since 1901. Both the number of women serving in the active component and their occupational roles have steadily increased and expanded. Currently, almost one in seven active component service members are female and more than 95% of military occupational specialties are open to women. This infographic summarizes data on the demographic and military characteristics of women including women of childbearing potential (WOCBP) in the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces during 2012 – 2016. Data on pregnancy-related care and birth rates are also presented. FINDINGS •	In 2016, WOCBP comprised the vast majority of active component service women. •	202,849 women served in the active component of the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Marine Corps. 197,947 (97.6%) were WOCBP. Pie chart displays depicting this information. •	In 2016, 13.1% of all WOCBP had at least one pregnancy-related event. Pie chat displays depicting this information. Female stick figures display to show visual of the largest proportions of WOCBP. Breakdown of WOCBP by service: •	Army (32.9%) •	Air Force (30.0%) •	Navy (29.7%) •	Marine Corps (7.5%) Pie chart displays to visually depict breakdown of WOCBP by service. The largest proportions of WOCBP were: •	In a communications / intelligence occupation (32.3%) •	Junior enlisted rank (46.5%) •	Non-Hispanic white (43.4%) •	20 – 24 years old (34.3%) Live births: •	There were 63,879 live births during the surveillance period. •	Overall live birth rate was 64.9 live births per 1,000 person-years (p-yrs). This rate of live births decreased steadily from 69.8 per 1,000 p-yrs in 2012 to 59.7 per 1,000 p-yrs in 2016. Line graph displays this information. Rates of live births were highest among: •	Women who were 30 – 34 years old •	Enlisted or junior officer rank •	Army •	In healthcare / intelligence occupations •	Married Access the full report in the November 2017 MSMR (Vol. 24, No. 11). Go to: www.Health.mil/MSMR

This infographic summarizes data on the demographic and military characteristics of women including women of childbearing potential (WOCBP) in the active component of the U.S. Armed Forces during 2012 – 2016. Data on pregnancy-related care and birth rates are also presented.

Recommended Content:

Women's Health

Tdap vaccination coverage during pregnancy, active component service women, 2006 – 2014

Infographic
8/14/2017
Pertussis, commonly known as “whooping cough,” is a vaccine-preventable illness more common and more severe in children than in adults. Infections during the first few months of life can be particularly severe, with almost all deaths from pertussis occurring in infants less than 6 months of age. A vaccinated mother’s antibodies against pertussis protect the baby during pregnancy until it can receive the vaccine at two months of age. Approximately 400 probable and 50 confirmed cases occur annually among service members and other adult beneficiaries of the Military Health System. In 2012, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended Tdap for every pregnancy to reduce the burden of pertussis in infants. This surveillance study assessed Tdap vaccination coverage among pregnant service women during 2006 through 2014. FINDINGS: •	There were records of a total of 137,133 live birth deliveries to service women •	Only 1%  – 3% of service women received a Tdap vaccine during pregnancy from 2006  – 2011 •	Tdap vaccination coverage increased substantially  – 8% in 2012 to 54% in 2014 •	Navy women had the highest  annual proportion of vaccine coverage at 65% in 2014 •	First deliveries had the highest vaccination coverage at 57% in 2014 •	Fourth or subsequent deliveries had the lowest coverage at 41% in 2014 More education and attention by military physicians and pregnant service women about the benefits of Tdap vaccination are needed to bring coverage closer to 100%. Learn more in MSMR Vol. 22 No. 5 May 2015 at Health.mil/MSMR  Images on graphic: •	Baby icon to depict live birth deliveries •	Pie charts showing the findings in visual form •	Line graph showing the percent vaccinated among Navy, Marine Corps, Army, Air Force and Coast Guard The line graph shows the annual percentages of active component service women with a live birth delivery who received a Tdap vaccine during pregnancy, by year of delivery and service, 2011– 2014.

This infographic documents findings from a surveillance study that assessed Tdap vaccination coverage among pregnant service women during 2006 through 2014.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Tetanus-Diphtheria-Pertussis | Women's Health

Flag Football Game

Photo
9/28/2016
Youth participate in a flag football game on Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Travis Gershaneck)

Youth participate in a flag football game on Marine Corps Air Station in Yuma, Arizona. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Travis Gershaneck)

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Physical Activity

Back to School Health and Safety Checklist

Infographic
8/4/2016
Health and Safety Checklist for Back to School

This infographic provides a going back to school health and safety checklist.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health | Immunizations

Interim Guidance for Prevention of Sexual Transmission of Zika Virus

Policy

With this update, CDC is expanding its existing recommendations to cover all pregnant couples, which includes pregnant women with female sex partners. This guidance also describes what other couples (those who are not pregnant or planning to become pregnant) can do to reduce the risk for Zika virus transmission. CDC’s recommendations for couples planning to become pregnant have been published separately (9).

Zika Virus and Pregnancy

Infographic
6/21/2016
infographic about Zika virus and pregnancy

Zika can cause certain birth defects. This infographic offers information to pregnant women about how to protect themselves from the Zika virus.

Recommended Content:

Preventing Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Zika Virus | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses | Women's Health

The HPV Vaccine Saves Lives

Infographic
5/16/2016
The Defense Department recommends male and female military service members, ages 17-26 years, receive an HPV vaccine series to generate a robust immune response to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4). This graphic highlights information the benefits of the HPV vaccine. The vaccine is most effective among fully vaccinated individuals.   Cancer Prevention Facts •	HPV is the most common sexually  transmitted infection (STI) •	There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas •	Some HPV types give warts •	Some HPV types develop cancer  Effective Against STI Transmission •	The HPV vaccine is a safe and effective way to protect yourself from the virus •	The HPV vaccine provides nearly 100% protection from HPV types 6,11,16 and 18 •	HPV vaccine shows early signs of success in reducing HPV infections and related illnesses •	Protection is expected to be long-lasting  Safety Tips •	Getting your HPV vaccine and practicing safe sex such as wearing a condom may lower the risk of HPV •	Limiting the number of lifetime sex partners can also lower the risk of HPV •	When given the HPV vaccine, the body makes antibodies in response to the protection to clear it from the body  Get the Facts •	2,091 female service members aged 17-26 years received 1-3 HPV4 doses during 2006-2012, stratified by number of doses (1, 2, or 3).  Get the HPV Vaccine •	Only 22.5% of eligible service members initiated the series •	Of those, only 39.1% completed the full three-dose series as of June 2011.  Even though the 3 dose regiment provides nearly complete protection against HPV16 and HPV18, in the U.S., only 12% and 19% of female adolescents among commercial and Medicaid plans respectively complete the series.  Read HPV Facts from the CDC: https://www.ok.gov/health2/documents/IMM_Teens_HPV_Facts.pdf  Read the STI issue of the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report at Health.Mil/MSMR   Get the conversation started. Ask your healthcare provider about the HPV vaccine today. Follow us on Twitter @AFHSBPAGE and use hashtag #VaccinesWork.

The Defense Department recommends male and female military service members, ages 17-26 years, receive an HPV vaccine series to generate a robust immune response to the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4).

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Immunizations | Men's Health | Human Papillomavirus | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Women's Health

Breast Cancer

Infographic
5/9/2016
infographic about the breast cancer and how to protect against it.

In the U.S., with the exception of skin cancer, breast cancer accounts for the greatest number of cancer diagnoses in women and the second most common cause of female cancer-related deaths. This infographic shows seven ways to protect yourself from breast cancer.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Women's Health

Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy

Publication
2/26/2016

The National Smallpox Vaccine in Pregnancy Registry was created to follow the pregnancy outcomes of women who were exposed to the smallpox vaccine during pregnancy.

Recommended Content:

Smallpox (ACAM2000) | Women's Health

Cervical Health Awareness Month

Infographic
1/11/2016
Infographic about Cervical Health Awareness month

January is Cervical Health Awareness Month

Recommended Content:

Women's Health | Preventive Health

Preventive Health Tip 4

Infographic
8/24/2015
Preventive Health Tip #4: Healthy Dental Habits

Encourage your child to practice healthy dental habits

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health

Preventive Health Tip 3

Infographic
8/17/2015
Preventive Health Tip #3: Healthy Snacks on Hand

Avoid obesity--keep a variety of healthy snacks on hand.

Recommended Content:

Preventive Health | Children's Health
<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 
Showing results 61 - 72 Page 5 of 5

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.