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DHA improves financial efficiency with consolidated funding system

Soldier wearing mask, marking items off in supply room Defense Health Agency financial system consolidations at military treatment facilities improve business processes for facilities like Navy Medical Readiness and Training Command Pearl Harbor, ensuring they have the necessary medical equipment and supplies to fight COVID-19. (Photo by Macy Hinds.)

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The Defense Health Agency achieved a major milestone towards improving financial efficiency when they converted legacy funding systems at 26 Navy military medical treatment facilities (MTFs) to the General Fund Enterprise Business System (GFEBS) in early September.

The conversions enable GFEBS financial structure and funding control by the DHA, said Pat Staley, program manager for the Medical Logistics Information Technology (MEDLOG IT) Program Management Office. As a result, the DHA can control all funding for DHA, Army and Navy sites using the Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support (DMLSS) system, significantly enhancing enterprise Defense Health Program fund management capabilities.

“The GFEBS consolidation is especially beneficial during the COVID-19 pandemic, since it gives the DHA greater control and visibility of MTF operational funding for critical supplies and equipment,” Staley said.

GFEBS is a web-based enterprise resource planning (ERP) system developed by the Army in 2005 to standardize business processes and transactional input across the Service branch. DMLSS is an automated, integrated medical logistics information system used by the Military Health System for more than 20 years.

MEDLOG IT, part of the DHA Solution Delivery Division (SDD), completed conversions to DMLSS servers at the Navy MTFs from the legacy FASTDATA financial system to the General Fund Enterprise Business System (GFEBS) in early September.

Staley said a future opportunity for MEDLOG IT may include migrating Air Force MTFs to GFEBS, creating a single financial ERP for the DHA.

“This is a highly significant achievement,” said SDD chief Army Col. Francisco Dominicci. “MEDLOG IT was able to complete this initiative on schedule despite challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic.”

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