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Navy Corpsman helps maintain USS Albany readiness

Soldier wearing a stethoscope on a submarine Navy Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Matthew Carter poses for a portrait photograph aboard the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Albany. (U.S. Navy photo Petty Officer 2nd Class Cameron Stoner)

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An independent duty corpsman (IDC) is helping to maintain operational readiness for the Submarine Force aboard the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Albany at Naval Station Norfolk in Virginia.

Navy Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Matthew Carter is currently serving aboard Albany as an IDC. After successfully completing Navy recruit training and hospital corpsman ‘A’ school, Carter went on to complete medical and submarine training schools before reporting to Albany.

“I started my career as a behavioral health technician from the Naval School of Health Sciences,” Carter said. “I later completed training at the Basic Enlisted Submarine School and subsequent training at the Naval Undersea Medical Institute in topics covering radiation health, and clinical and operational medicine.”

Carter is now Albany’s medical department representative, advising the boat’s commanding officer in strategic mission planning and passing on his knowledge to future corpsman.

“Aboard Albany I serve as an extension of the immediate superior in command,” Carter said. “I have performed numerous medical and radiation health inspections. I’ve also hosted two medical officers and five IDC students during their clinical rotations, providing them real world training as they prepare for fleet assignment.”

With years of experience under his belt, Carter uses his knowledge and skills to ensure Albany sailors are always ready to meet operational demands when called upon.

“I support Albany’s combat operational readiness through the maintenance of 100 percent medical and dental readiness, conducting preventive medicine inspections, and monitoring and assessing occupational exposure to ionizing radiation,” Carter said.

With the recent COVID-19 global pandemic, Carter led the team of command advisors in the pandemic’s incident response. His leadership and knowledge has helped to mitigate risks and ensure Albany and Submarine Force operations were not impacted.

“During the global pandemic, I have triaged and managed COVID-19 concerns allowing for sustained operations,” Carter said. “I’ve supervised and conducted 1,500 screenings and provided all-hands training on infection control.”

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