Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

DHA Director visits MCAGCC to hear from the ‘Boots on the Ground’

Image of Military personnel wearing face masks walking. Army Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, Defense Health Agency director, is escorted into Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms by Hospital Director, Navy Captain Lynelle Boamah. The DHA Director conducted a director’s call with hospital staff and met with the board of governors (Photo by: Dave Marks, Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms).

Recommended Content:

Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | Military Health System Transformation | Coronavirus | Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine

Change is inevitable. Everyone knows it. No one likes it.

Army Lt. Gen. Ronald Place, Director of the Defense Health Agency has a sign in his office: "I'm good with change. You go first."

Place was aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center on May 13 to meet with Marine Corps leadership in the morning, and with the Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms Board of Governors in the afternoon. His goal was to hear firsthand how seminal change, such as the MHS GENESIS electronic health record and the consolidation of Army, Air Force and Navy medicine into the Defense Health Agency is affecting boots on the ground.

Place, an Army surgeon, views change from a scientist's perspective. "The thing that matters most is healthcare delivery," he said. The challenge is to take the best of Army medicine, the best of Navy medicine the best of Air Force Medicine and figure out what can be standardized across the services while recognizing the cultures and traditions we support."

The DHA Director noted that under the new DHA construct, it's the warfighter and the concept of readiness that is central to the mission. While some military medical treatment facilities with high population densities and a surplus of sub-specialty choices in their surrounding areas are realigning to focus on active-duty readiness, Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms will continue to support its retiree population, as well as the family members of the Marines and sailors aboard the base – due to its isolated location.

Military personnel wearing face masks speaking
Army Lt. Gen. Ronald Place addresses the Navy corpsmen assigned to the Adult Medical Care Clinic, a Naval Twentynine Palms Hospital healthcare clinic that treats the Marines and sailors aboard the Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center, the largest U.S. Marine Corps training base in the world, encompassing 1,100 square miles in the Mojave Desert in Southern California (Photo by: Dave Marks, Naval Hospital Twentynine Palms).

Place addressed the rise in telehealth encounters as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. "For behavioral health, we have years of experience. We know what parts work well and what parts represent challenges. With that experience, we did very well during the pandemic," Place said. "But before I can sign off on virtual health in other areas, we have to figure out if face-to-face care versus a virtual environment offers the same or better outcome. We have to figure out what we're measuring and how to measure it before I can give it the thumbs up."

Place doesn't think the COVID-19 vaccine will become mandatory while it is still classified as an emergency-use authorization with the FDA. "I know of at least one manufacturer that has already made an application for full-licensure," he said. "If full license is granted, I wouldn't be at all surprised if it becomes just like the other vaccines that are fully licensed that we get as service members. So that's the future."

After a long day that started on one of the Combat Center's training ranges and ended at the naval hospital's Adult Medical Care Clinic (serving the active-duty population), the DHA Director was enthusiastic about his visit.

"After experiencing the interactions with the Marines when we were out in the urban training center and the sailors working inside this facility, it's very clear to us that this is a close-knit community that cares about how they support each other, how they can help each other, and how ultimately they can achieve complete success in every part of the organization," he said.

"Hats off to every single leader here, from the commanding general, to the squad leaders – every leader in this organization makes this culture happen. We were thrilled to be invited here and glad we could spend the day with the team."

You also may be interested in...

How MHS GENESIS will become essential to patients' health journey

Article
6/21/2022
Dr. Robert Marshall, program director of the Department of Defense Clinical Informatics Fellowship at Madigan Army Medical Center.

Ensuring proper training of both providers and patients is essential for the successful integration and sustainment of MHS GENESIS into MHS care.

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Health Care Technology | MHS GENESIS Toolkit | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | MHS GENESIS

Patients at Naval Branch Health Clinic Albany can take steps now to prepare for MHS GENESIS ‘Go Live’

Article Around MHS
5/17/2022
MHS GENESIS log on

Naval Branch Health Clinic (NBHC) Albany will transition to the Military Health System’s new electronic health record, MHS GENESIS, on June 11

Recommended Content:

Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | MHS GENESIS

Future of Nursing: Telehealth, More Innovation and Maybe Some Robots

Article
5/13/2022
Second Lt. Nina Hoskins, 81st Surgical Operations Squadron operating room nurse, briefs Col. Debra Lovette, 81st Training Wing commander, and other base leadership on robotics surgery capabilities inside the robotics surgery clinic at the Keesler Medical Center June 16, 2017. (Photo: Kemberly Groue, U.S. Air Force)

The future of nursing is here due in part to changes brought by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recommended Content:

Nursing in the Military Health System | Coronavirus

‘I Love the Intensity’ – One Nurse Recalls Three COVID-19 Deployments

Article
5/5/2022
In 2020, Air Force 1st Lt. Tiffany Parra, an ICU nurse at the 633rd Medical Group, on Joint Base Langley-Eustis, Virginia, was deployed to a North Dakota hospital to support a FEMA COVID-19 mission. In the photo, she trains on equipment used for critical patients in a North Dakota ICU. (Photo: Courtesy of Air Force 1st Lt. Tiffany Parra)

Nurses are unique, they follow a calling to care for others. Military nurses do that as well as serve their nation. For Nurses Week, the MHS highlights some of their own.

Recommended Content:

Nurses Week Toolkit: United In Service, Rooted in Strength | Nursing in the Military Health System | Coronavirus

How One Military Nurse Persevered Through the COVID-19 Response

Article
5/5/2022
Air Force Capt. Courtney Ebeling, a medical-surgical nurse at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph Family Health Clinic, Texas, was deployed to support the COVID-19 response in Afghanistan in 2021. They administered vaccinations to U.S. citizens, service members, and foreign military members as well as supported the preparation to withdraw from the country. (Photo: Courtesy of Air Force Capt. Courtney Ebeling)

Nurses across the Military Health System have played a vital role in providing routine patient care and meeting the needs of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Recommended Content:

Nurses Week Toolkit: United In Service, Rooted in Strength | Coronavirus | Nursing in the Military Health System

Winn ACH prepares to transition to MHS GENESIS

Article Around MHS
5/4/2022
Military Health Personnel in Army hospital

U.S. Army Medical Department Activity Fort Stewart – Hunter Army Airfield healthcare continues to prepare to transition healthcare records to the new Department of Defense system - Military Health System GENESIS.

Recommended Content:

Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | MHS GENESIS

New MHS GENESIS Capabilities Deployed at BAMC and LACKLAND

Article
5/3/2022
Trauma personnel receive an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or ECMO patient into the Emergency Department at Brooke Army Medical Center, Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Texas, Jan. 24, 2022. MHS GENESIS new functionalities support BAMC’s Level I Trauma Center. (Photo: Corey Toye, Brooke Army Medical Center)

Wave BAMC and Wave LACKLAND simultaneously deployed the new single common federal electronic health record (EHR), which the DOD calls MHS GENESIS. With these Waves, the DOD activated over 11,000 new MHS GENESIS users.

Recommended Content:

Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | Program Executive Office, Defense Healthcare Management Systems | In the Spotlight

Pandemic Spotlights the Vital Role of Military Lab Workers

Article
5/2/2022
U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Ashley Solomon, 18th Medical Support Squadron NCO in charge of microbiology, unloads blood samples from a centrifuge at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Jan. 31, 2019. (Photo: Tech. Sgt. Matthew B. Fredericks, U.S. Air Force)

MHS clinical labs produce results.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus

Helping Your Child to Cope with Grief and Losses Related to COVID-19

Article
4/28/2022
Shirley Lanham Elementary School students perform Taiko drumming during a Month of the Military Child celebration aboard the Naval Air Facility Atsugi, Japan, April 6, 2022. (Photo: Petty Officer 2nd Class Ange-Olivier Clement, Naval Air Facility Atsugi)

Many military children have lost loved ones to COVID-19. How parents can help with the grief.

Recommended Content:

Month of the Military Child - Celebrating Military Kids | Children's Health | Psychological Fitness | Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus

C-Suite's Culture of Care

Article
4/27/2022
U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Clinton Murray (right), Brooke Army Medical Center commanding general and an infectious disease physician, and Dr. Evan Renz, deputy to the commander for quality and safety and a general surgeon, stop to compare notes during Saturday morning rounds at BAMC on Joint Base San Antonio-Fort Sam Houston, Dec. 18, 2021. (Courtesy Photo)

It can be a balancing act, but senior leaders at Brooke Army Medical Center make it a priority to carve out time for clinical care.

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS

How to Help Military Children Reconnect After Two Years of the Pandemic

Article
4/25/2022
Airman 1st Class Rocio Romo, Space Launch Delta 30 public affairs specialist, and her son pose for a photo at Cocheo Park on Vandenberg Space Force Base, California, March 25, 2022. During the month of April, we celebrate Month of the Military Child to highlight the sacrifices military children make on the home front while their parents serve the United States. (Photo: Airman Kadielle Shaw, Space Launch Delta 30 Public Affairs)

How parents can help children stressed by more than two years of COVID-19.

Recommended Content:

Month of the Military Child - Celebrating Military Kids | Children's Health | Psychological Fitness | Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus

COVID-19 Testing and Treatment Main Graphic

Infographic
4/21/2022
COVID-19 Testing and Treatment Main Graphic

If your military hospital or clinic offers these antiviral treatments as part of the COVID-19 Test to Treat Initiative, use these graphics to promote your services to your beneficiaries.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | COVID-19 Treatment

COVID-19 Testing and Treatment Graphic 2

Infographic
4/21/2022
COVID-19 Testing and Treatment Graphic 2

If your military hospital or clinic offers these antiviral treatments as part of the COVID-19 Test to Treat Initiative, use these graphics to promote your services to your beneficiaries.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | COVID-19 Treatment

MHS GENESIS: Commanders Say Electronic Health Records Foster Improved Care

Article
4/20/2022
An Army soldier and patient actor sports a mock impalement while providing simulated medical information to test out a new electronic medical record system designed to virtually document medical encounters in the field. The mock scenario was part of the U.S. Navy’s Rim of the Pacific exercise in 2018. (Photo: Ana Allen, U.S. Army)

MHS GENESIS improves health care for military beneficiaries across the enterprise.

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS

COVID-19 Booster Effectiveness Remained High During Omicron Surge

Article
4/18/2022
Hospital Corpsman 1st Class Mary Ashcraft, assigned to the combat ship USS Tulsa, administers a COVID-19 vaccine booster to Aviation Machinist Mate 1st Class Anthony Johnson Jan. 10, 2022, at Apra Harbor, Guam. (Photo: Mass Communication Specialist Petty Officer 1st Class Devin M. Langer, Command Destroyer Squadron 7)

Two new studies of active-duty service members show COVID-19 booster vaccines are effective, but uptake rates in the military community lagged behind the civilian population.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Efforts
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 52
Refine your search
Last Updated: May 19, 2021

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.