Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Reform, COVID-19 Have Been Catalysts for Change in Military Medicine

Dr. Terry Adirim speaking to an audience at a conference Dr. Terry Adirim, acting assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, speaks to the audience during a Views from the Top educational session at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society 2021 annual conference at the Venetian Resort in Las Vegas, August 10 (Jacob Moore, MHS Communications).

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus | COVID-19 Vaccine Toolkit | Military Health System Transformation

"We cannot forget that healthcare is about taking care of people, so no amount of change or innovation is ever sufficient if modernization does not lead to helping patients, delivering better outcomes, saving lives or helping healthcare providers deliver care," said Dr. Terry Adirim, acting assistant secretary of defense for health affairs, during a Views from the Top educational session at the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society 2021 annual conference.

She spoke about the unique differences, as well as the similarities, between civilian and military medicine.

"I believe there are unique lessons from our experience within the Military Health System, regardless of what sector of healthcare you sit in," said Adirim. "From data systems driving greater efficiencies and better outcomes within our agencies, to efforts helping us realize the advancements in science and medicine."

These innovations, she said, are aligning federal healthcare providers with the best in private sector care, delivering the best results for service members and their families.

Adirim said the two largest factors currently leading to innovations, changes and advancements within the MHS are:

"We can't discuss innovation, modernization and responding to change without also talking about the pandemic. COVID-19 continues to prove to be the ultimate disruptor," she said. "It has tested the readiness and resilience of the entire enterprise and put our providers at risk and, ultimately, threatens our service members' ability to do their jobs."

Adirim explained how new approaches to medical care and public health such as virtual health and testing methodology have kept military health beneficiaries safe since the onset of the pandemic.

These, "seemingly small but significant wins," she said, have created real change.

She cited Keesler Medical Center in Biloxi, Mississippi's best practice of using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's recommended 15-minute waiting period following COVID-19 vaccination to ask patients about making appointments for routine care that may have been missed due to increased focus on the virus.

Adirim also used the opportunity to praise the military medical community.

"It is a privilege to lead and serve military medical providers who are fully committed to ensuring the health and readiness of our troops, which is so vital to our national security," she said. "They have been doing so through an especially challenging time of national and global disruption due to the COVID pandemic."

Defense Health Agency Director Army Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Ronald Place also spoke at HIMSS21 as part of the Views from the Top series the following day.

You also may be interested in...

Transition spotlight: Air Force Medical Service

Article
1/13/2020
Air Force Maj. Nicole Ward, left, and Capt. Matthew Muncey, program managers with the Air Force Medical Service Transition Cell, at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia, Jan. 9, 2020. (U.S. Air Force photo by Josh Mahler)

Two Airmen deeply are involved with the process of standing up DHA’s new capabilities to manage MTFs

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation

Achievements in 2019 provide strong foundation for year ahead

Article
12/23/2019
A Year in Review: Year of Military Health 2019

Dedication, commitment to mission praised as changes continue

Recommended Content:

TRICARE Health Program | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | Research and Innovation | Medical and Dental Preventive Care Fitness | Military Health System Transformation

Payne visits service members, facilities in Puget Sound

Article
12/18/2019
Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee Payne, assistant director for Combat Support, Defense Health Agency, speaks with service members and staff at Madigan Army Medical Center during a town hall in Letterman Auditorium. Payne visited Madigan as the final stop of his tour of the Pacific Northwest military treatment facilities, also including the Air Force’s 62nd Medical Squadron, Naval Hospital Bremerton and Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor. He conducted town halls at each location, focusing on MHS transformation, and answering questions from the audience on topics ranging from MHS GENESIS, readiness and training, and the future of military medicine. (U.S. Army photo by Ryan Graham)

Effective combat power depends on military health’s ability to build a medically ready force

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS

DHA transition discussion hosted at Naval Hospital Bremerton

Article
12/12/2019
Air Force Maj. Gen. Lee E. Payne, Assistant Director for Combat Support Agency, Defense Health Agency explained to Naval Hospital Bremerton staff members during a Town Hall meeting there are four overlapping areas of focus for DHA which are great outcomes, ready medical force, satisfied patients, and fulfilled staff, all contributing to the goal of having a medically ready force and a ready medical force.

The most important outcome for us is a medically ready force

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Changes to military health care system aimed at readiness

Article
12/6/2019
Speaking before the House Armed Services subcommittee on personnel during a Dec. 5 hearing on Capitol Hill, Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Thomas McCaffrey (left), Army Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Ronald Place (second from left), director of the DHA, the service Surgeons General, and Joint Staff Surgeon outlined the necessity for the health care system to change in order to support warfighter readiness. (MHS photo)

Merger of all hospitals and clinics to DHA a key step

Recommended Content:

Military Health System Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Military hospital transformation – introducing the market construct

Article
12/5/2019
Barclay Butler, Ph.D., MBA, assistant director of management at DHA, explains the market concept to an audience of active-duty and civilian conference attendees at the 2019 AMSUS Annual Meeting in National Harbor, Maryland, Dec. 4. (Photo by MHS Communications)

Markets will manage hospital and clinic needs within a geographic region

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Military Health System Transformation

McCaffery calls for military medical strategic framework for warfighting readiness

Article
12/5/2019
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Tom McCaffery speaks on Thursday at the annual meeting of AMSUS, the Society of Federal Health Professionals. McCaffery announced to the nearly 2,000 conference attendees that he has asked the Military Health System's senior leadership to develop and codify a formal strategic framework to guide integrating and optimizing all MHS components to meet his vision. (MHS photo)

'New reality' includes tight synchronization, expanding partnerships

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Military Health System Transformation
<< < ... 26 27 28 29 > >> 
Showing results 421 - 427 Page 29 of 29

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.