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The challenge of sleep management in military operations.

Study

Abstract

It has long been known that short-term (days) insufficient sleep causes decrements in mental effectiveness that put individuals at increased risk of committing errors and causing accidents. More recently, it has been discovered that chronic poor sleep (over years) is associated with a variety of negative health outcomes (metabolic syndrome, obesity, degraded behavioral health). Implementing an effective sleep health program is, therefore, in the best interests of active duty personnel and their families both in the short- and long-term. Like managing physical activity or nutrition, effectively managing sleep health comes with its unique set of challenges arising from the fact that individuals who routinely do not obtain sufficient sleep are generally desensitized to feeling sleepy and are poor at judging their own performance capabilities--and individuals cannot be compelled to sleep. For these reasons, an optimally effective sleep health program requires 3 components: (1) a rigorous, evidence-based sleep education component to impart actionable knowledge about optimal sleep amounts, healthy sleep behaviors, the known benefits of sleep, the short- and long-term consequences of insufficient sleep, and to dispel myths about sleep; (2) a nonintrusive device that objectively and accurately measures sleep to empower the individual to track his/her own sleep/wake habits; and (3) a meaningful, actionable metric reflecting sleep/wake impact on daily effectiveness so that the individual sees the consequences of his/her sleep behavior and, therefore, can make informed sleep health choices.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2013
  • Citation: Wesensten NJ, Balkin TJ. The challenge of sleep management in military operations. US Army Med Dep J. 2013 Oct-Dec:109-18.

The association of predeployment and deployment-related factors on dimensions of postdeployment wellness in U.S. military service members.

Study

Abstract

PURPOSE: To assess the effects of predeployment and deployment-related factors on dimensions of wellness following deployment. DESIGN: Prospective longitudinal study. The dependent variable was dimensions of wellness. Independent variables were measured in terms of modifiable, nonmodifiable, and military factors, such as sex, race/ethnicity, service branch, smoking status, and combat experience. SETTING: A large military cohort participating in the Millennium Cohort Study. SUBJECTS: Included 10,228 participants who deployed in support of the operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. MEASURES: Dimensions of wellness were measured by using standardized instruments assessing self-reported physical health, mental health, and stress. Covariates were measured by using self-reported and electronic data. ANALYSIS: Factors of postdeployment wellness were assessed by using ordinal logistic regression. RESULTS: Most participants (78.7%) were categorized as "moderately well" post deployment. Significant modifiable predeployment predictors of postdeployment wellness included normal/underweight body mass index (odds ratio [OR] = 1.72, p < .05). Military factors significantly associated with wellness included not experiencing combat (OR = .56, p < .05), member of Air Force (OR = 2.02, p < .05) or Navy/Coast Guard (OR = 1.47, p < .05), and combat specialist occupation (OR = 1.22, p < .05). CONCLUSION: Multiple modifiable factors associated with postdeployment wellness were identified, which may help inform medical and military leadership on potential strategies to ensure a well force. Those trained in combat roles were more likely to be well post deployment though this apparent benefit was not conferred onto those reporting combat experiences.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Navy
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2013
  • Citation: Bagnell ME, LeardMann CA, McMaster HS, Boyko EJ, et. al. The association of predeployment and deployment-related factors on dimensions of postdeployment wellness in U.S. military service members. Am J Health Promot. 2013 Nov-Dec;28(2):e56-66.

The association of percentage energy from fat and colon cancer risk among members of the US military.

Study

Abstract

Epidemiologic studies have previously reported an association between high fat intake and colon cancer risk. However, findings have generally been inconclusive. This study aimed to investigate the association between fat as a percentage of energy intake and colon cancer risk. Study subjects included 215 cases and 215 matched controls identified by the Defense Medical Surveillance System. Percentage energy from fat (Pfat) was estimated using a short dietary screener developed by the National Cancer Institute for two time periods: the year before the first blood draw and the year before colon cancer diagnosis. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the relationship between colon cancer risk and Pfat. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Compared with the lowest quartile of Pfat, the adjusted odds of having colon cancer were 2.00 (95% CI 0.96-4.18), 2.83 (95% CI 1.41-5.66), and 3.37 (95% CI 1.58-7.17), respectively, for the second, third, and highest quartiles in the year before cancer diagnosis. Similar results were observed for Pfat at an earlier time point. Our findings suggest a positive association between Pfat and colon cancer in the US military population.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Shao S, Kao TC, Eckhaus J, Bourgeois J, Perera K, Zhu K. The association of percentage energy from fat and colon cancer risk among members of the US military. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2014 Jul 29.

The association between US Army enlistment waivers and subsequent behavioral and social health outcomes and attrition from service

Study

Abstract

Soldiers granted enlistment waivers for medical concerns, misconduct, or positive alcohol/drug tests may or may not be associated with an increased likelihood of negative behavioral outcomes. Soldiers in the population examined (n = 8,943) who were granted enlistment waivers from 2003 to 2008 were significantly more likely to subsequently be screened for alcohol/substance abuse, test positive for illicit substances, or receive an Army separation for behavioral misconduct. These associations were highest among Soldiers granted waivers for nonlawful alcohol/drug violations. Soldiers granted waivers for felony offenses and serious nontraffic violations were significantly less likely to separate from the Army compared with Soldiers not granted enlistment waivers.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Army
  • Sponsoring Office: US Army Institute of Public Health
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: March 01, 2013
  • Citation: Gallaway MS, Bell MR, Lagana-Riordan C, Fink DS, Meyer CE, Millikan AM. The association between US Army enlistment waivers and subsequent behavioral and social health outcomes and attrition from service. Mil Med. 2013 Mar;178(3):261-6.

Tdap coverage in a military beneficiary population: room for improvement.

Study

Abstract

Pertussis has had a resurgence in recent years. Women of child-bearing age and adults with infant contact are important reservoirs of infection because of waning immunity. Recent infant deaths and outbreaks led to new tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccine recommendations, but vaccination rates remain low. A performance improvement project was started at Walter Reed Army Medical Center to target women of child-bearing age. Women treated in Gynecology had their electronic medical record screened for Tdap during their vital signs assessment. Those eligible for vaccination were directed to the Immunization Clinic. The intervention was considered successful if the patient received the vaccine within 30 days of the visit. Data were compiled on vaccination rates 1 month before and 1 and 3 months after the start of the performance improvement project. Only 13.9% of all patients had a documented Tdap at any time. During the first month following the intervention, vaccination rates within 30 days of the appointment increased from 0.38% to 6.5% (p < 0.005). The effect waned at 3 months following intervention, with only 1.1% of patients vaccinated within 30 days of the appointment. Overall vaccination rates remain low, and future studies should focus on barriers to vaccination to prevent morbidity and mortality.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2013
  • Citation: Lam ST, George S, Dunlow S, Nelson M, Hartzell JD. Tdap coverage in a military beneficiary population: room for improvement. Mil Med. 2013 Oct;178(10):1133-6.

Syncope among U.S. Air Force basic military trainees, August 2012-July 2013.

Study

Abstract

Syncope is a common event with many possible etiologies, ranging from benign to severe. Syncopal episodes of any origin, however, may result in traumatic injury due to postural collapse. Based on the prevalence of internal and external stressors during training, basic military trainees may be at increased risk for syncope. Between 1 August 2012 and 31 July 2013, there were 112 unique individuals who experienced syncopal or pre-syncopal events among basic military trainees at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas, the only basic training site in the U.S. Air Force. The overall rate was 19.6 cases per 1,000 person-years (18.4 and 36.1 per 1,000 person-years in males and females, respectively). Based upon the findings of electronic chart review of the 112 cases, a majority of events occurred either during or immediately after exercise (n=38) or during a blood draw, immunization, or laceration repair (n=22). The most common etiologies were judged to be neurocardiogenic (n=54) and orthostatic hypotension (n=40), and two cases were attributed to cardiovascular disease. These findings support current preventive measures, including anemia screening during medical in-processing, an emphasis on hydration throughout training, and a padded floor in the trainee vaccination bay.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2013
  • Citation: Webber BJ, Cropper TL, Federinko SP. Syncope among U.S. Air Force basic military trainees, August 2012-July 2013. MSMR. 2013 Nov;20(11):2-4.

Survival and Racial Differences of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States Military.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States (US) Military and worldwide, with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounting for 87 % of cases. OBJECTIVES: Using a US military cohort who receives equal and open access to healthcare, we sought to examine demographic, clinical features and outcomes with NSCLC. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of 4,751 patients, aged ≥ 18 years and diagnosed with a first primary NSCLC between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2013 in the US Department of Defense (DoD) cancer registry. MAIN MEASURES: Differences by patient and disease characteristics were compared using Chi-square and t-test. Kaplan Meier curves and Cox proportional hazards regression assessed overall survival. RESULTS: The mean age at diagnosis was 66 years, 64 % were male, 72 % were Caucasian, 41 % were diagnosed at early stage, 77 % received treatment and 82 % had a history of tobacco use. Mean age at diagnosis was highest among Caucasians (67 years) and lowest among African Americans (AA; 62 years). Asian/Pacific Islanders (PI) were more likely to be female (p < 0.0001), have adenocarcinoma histology (p = 0.0003) and less likely to have a history of tobacco use (p < 0.0001) compared to other racial/ethnic groups. In multivariable survival analysis, older age, male gender, increasing stage, not receiving treatment, and tobacco history were associated with higher mortality risk. Untreated patients exhibited a 39 % higher mortality risk compared to treated patients (HR = 1.39; 95%CI = 1.23-1.57). Compared to Caucasian patients, Asian/PIs demonstrated a 20 % lower risk of death (HR = 0.80; 95%CI = 0.66-0.96). There was no difference in mortality risk between AAs and Hispanics compared to Caucasians. CONCLUSION: The lack of significant outcome disparity between AAs and Caucasians and the earlier stage at diagnosis than usually seen in civilian populations suggest that equal access to healthcare may play a role in early detection and survival.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2015
  • Citation: Brzezniak C, Satram-Hoang S, Goertz HP, Reyes C, Gunuganti A, Gallagher C, Carter CA. Survival and Racial Differences of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer in the United States Military. J Gen Intern Med. 2015 Oct;30(10):1406-12

Surveillance snapshot: states with the most pertussis diagnoses among service members and other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, January 2012-June 2014.

Study

Abstract

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, so far in 2014, reported cases of pertussis in the U.S. have increased 24% over the previous year; by June 16, a total of 9,964 cases of pertussis had been reported by 50 states and the District of Columbia. On June 13, the California Department of Public Health announced that the state was experiencing a pertussis (“whooping cough”) epidemic. As of June 10, a total of 3,458 cases had been reported in the state; this number of pertussis cases exceeds the number of cases reported in the entire year in 2013. Th e MSMR has previously reported on spatiotemporal clusters of pertussis in the military that were associated with outbreaks in neighboring non-military communities; this association was clearly demonstrated during a previous 2010 outbreak in California. Between January 2012 and June 2014, the greatest number of pertussis cases (both confi rmed and probable) diagnosed in military benefi ciaries occurred in California, Texas, Washington, Virginia, and Florida (Figure); 90 cases have been diagnosed in California since January 2014, which is more than was reported in all of 2012 (n=68) or 2013 (n=89).

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center (AFHSC). Surveillance snapshot: states with the most pertussis diagnoses among service members and other beneficiaries of the Military Health System, January 2012-June 2014. MSMR. 2014 Jun;21(6):18.

Surveillance snapshot: Bacterial meningitis among beneficiaries of the military health system, 1998-2013.

Study

Abstract

From 1998 to 2013 (partial year), 3,782 beneficiaries of the Military Health System (MHS) were diagnosed as cases of bacterial meningitis. Cases were ascertained from diagnoses recorded in special electronic reports of meningococcal meningitis (a Reportable Medical Event in the MHS) or in records of inpatient hospital stays in which bacterial meningitis was documented in the primary or secondary diagnostic position. Among the three types of benefi ciary groups, the proportions of meningitis cases by bacterial type varied. In active and Reserve/Guard component service members, meningococcal meningitis was the most commonly documented specifi ed type of bacterial meningitis. Among all other benefi ciaries (e.g., spouses, children, retirees, etc.) streptococcal meningitis was the most commonly specifi ed type of bacterial meningitis. Meningococcal meningitis was diagnosed among 91 active component service members, 14 Reserve/Guard service members, and 251 other benefi ciaries (Figure 2). Th e overall rate in active component service members was 0.41 per 100,000 person-years. The incidence rate was relatively stable from 1998 to 2008, and then varied greatly from 2009 through 2013. In 2009 and 2011, there were no cases of meningococcal meningitis in active component service members. During the entire surveillance period, there were documented an additional 266 cases of meningococcal disease that were not recorded as meningitis. These included meningococcemia (n=150), carditis (n=13), and other specified and unspecifi ed meningococcal infections (n=103). These cases affected 38 active component members, 6 Reserve and Guard members, and 222 other benefi ciaries.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: November 01, 2013
  • Citation: AFHSC. Surveillance snapshot: Bacterial meningitis among beneficiaries of the military health system, 1998-2013. MSMR. 2013 Nov;20(11):15.

Suicide incidence and risk factors in an active duty US military population.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to investigate and identify risk factors for suicide among all active duty members of the US military during 2005 or 2007. METHODS: The study used a cross-sectional design and included the entire active duty military population. Study sample sizes were 2,064,183 for 2005 and 1,981,810 for 2007. Logistic regression models were used. RESULTS: Suicide rates for all services increased during this period. Mental health diagnoses, mental health visits, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), sleep prescriptions, reduction in rank, enlisted rank, and separation or divorce were associated with suicides. Deployments to Operation Enduring Freedom or Operation Iraqi Freedom were also associated with elevated odds ratios for all services in the 2007 population and for the Army in 2005. CONCLUSIONS: Additional research needs to address the increasing rates of suicide in active duty personnel. This should include careful evaluation of suicide prevention programs and the possible increase in risk associated with SSRIs and other mental health drugs, as well as the possible impact of shorter deployments, age, mental health diagnoses, and relationship problems

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: March 01, 2013
  • Citation: Hyman J, Ireland R, Frost L, Cottrell L. Suicide incidence and risk factors in an active duty US military population. Am J Public Health. 2012 Mar;102 Suppl 1:S138-46.

Sudden cardiac death associated with physical exertion in the US military, 2005-2010.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sudden cardiac death associated with physical exertion (SCD/E) is a complicated pathophysiological event. This study aims to calculate the incidence rate of SCD/E in the US military population from 2005 to 2010, to characterise the demographic and cardiovascular risk profiles of decedents, and to evaluate aetiologies of and circumstances surrounding the deaths. METHODS: Perimortem and other relevant data were collected from the Armed Forces Medical Examiners Tracking System, Armed Forces Health Longitudinal Technology Application, and Defense Medical Epidemiology Database for decedents meeting SCD/E case definition. Incidence rates were calculated and compared using negative binomial regression. RESULTS: The incidence of SCD/E in the Active Component (ie, full-time active duty) US military from 2005 to 2010 was 1.63 per 100 000 person-years (py): 0.98 and 3.84 per 100 000 py in those aged <35 and ≥35 years, respectively. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of death overall (55%) and in the ≥35-year age group (78%), whereas the leading cause of death in the <35-year age group (31%) could not be precisely determined and was termed idiopathic SCD/E (iSCD/E). SCD/E was more common in males than females (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 5.28, 95% CI 2.16 to 12.93) and more common in blacks than whites (IRR=2.60, 95% CI 1.81 to 3.72). All female cases were black. CONCLUSIONS: From 2005 to 2010, the incidence of SCD/E in US military members aged <35 years was similar to most reported corresponding civilian SCD rates. However, the leading cause of death was iSCD/E and not cardiomyopathy. Improved surveillance and age-based prevention strategies may reduce these rates.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: January 01, 2016
  • Citation: Smallman DP, Webber BJ, Mazuchowski EL, Scher AI, Jones SO, Cantrell JA. Sudden cardiac death associated with physical exertion in the US military, 2005-2010. Br J Sports Med. 2016 Jan;50(2):118-23.

Stress in Service Members.

Study

Abstract

Military service differs from civilian jobs in the stressors that service members experience, including frequent deployments (eg, to an area of combat operations), obedience, regimentation, subordination of self to the group, integrity, and flexibility. The military culture emphasizes teamwork and peer support. In some cases, service members cannot adapt to military life, become overwhelmed by stress, or cannot overcome a traumatic experience. Clinicians should conduct a thorough evaluation guided by an understanding of the military culture. Every effort should be made to identify the stress and the maladaptive response and provide early clinical interventions to prevent progression.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2014
  • Citation: Lande RG. Stress in Service Members. Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2014 Dec;37(4):547-560. doi: 10.1016/j.psc.2014.08.007.

Stress and Resilience in Military Mortuary Workers: Care of the Dead From Battlefield to Home.

Study

Abstract

The death of a military service member in war provokes feelings of distress and pride in mortuary workers who process the remains. To further understand their reactions, the authors interviewed 34 military and civilian personnel to learn more about their work stresses and rewards. They review stresses of anticipation, exposure, and experience in handling the dead and explore the personal, supervisory, and leadership strategies to reduce negative effects and promote personal growth. These results can be applied to many other situations requiring planning, implementing, and supervising mortuary operations involving mass death.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: August 01, 2014
  • Citation: Flynn BW, McCarroll JE, Biggs QM. Stress and Resilience in Military Mortuary Workers: Care of the Dead From Battlefield to Home. Death Stud. 2014 Aug 20:1-7.

Sleep characteristics, mental health, and diabetes risk: a prospective study of U.S. military service members in the Millennium Cohort Study.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Research has suggested that a higher risk of type 2 diabetes associated with sleep characteristics exists. However, studies have not thoroughly assessed the potential confounding effects of mental health conditions associated with alterations in sleep. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively assessed the association between sleep characteristics and self-reported incident diabetes among Millennium Cohort Study participants prospectively followed over a 6-year time period. Surveys are administered approximately every 3 years and collect self-reported data on demographics, height, weight, lifestyle, features of military service, sleep, clinician-diagnosed diabetes, and mental health conditions assessed by the PRIME-MD Patient Health Questionnaire and the PTSD Checklist-Civilian Version. Statistical methods for longitudinal data were used for data analysis. RESULTS: We studied 47,093 participants (mean 34.9 years of age; mean BMI 26.0 kg/m2; 25.6% female). During 6 years of follow-up, 871 incident diabetes cases occurred (annual incidence 3.6/1,000 person-years). In univariate analyses, incident diabetes was significantly more likely among participants with self-reported trouble sleeping, sleep duration<6 h, and sleep apnea. Participants reporting incident diabetes were also significantly older, of nonwhite race, of higher BMI, less likely to have been deployed, and more likely to have reported baseline symptoms of panic, anxiety, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression. After adjusting for covariates, trouble sleeping (odds ratio 1.21 [95% CI 1.03-1.42]) and sleep apnea (1.78 [1.39-2.28]) were significantly and independently related to incident diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Trouble sleeping and sleep apnea predict diabetes risk independent of mental health conditions and other diabetes risk factors.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: DoD agency, office, or organization other than the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Defense Health Agency
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2013
  • Citation: Boyko EJ, Seelig AD, Jacobson IG, Hooper TI, Smith B, Smith TC, et. al. Sleep characteristics, mental health, and diabetes risk: a prospective study of U.S. military service members in the Millennium Cohort Study. Diabetes Care. 2013 Oct;36(10):3154-61.

Sleep as a component of the performance triad: the importance of sleep in a military population.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Sleep habits among military populations are problematic. Poor sleep hygiene occurs in parallel with the global increase in obesity and metabolic syndrome and contributes to a decrease in performance. The extent of sleep issues needs to be quantified to provide feedback for optimizing warfighter performance and readiness. This study assessed various health behaviors and habits of US Army Soldiers and their relationship with poor sleep quality by introducing a set of new questions into the Comprehensive Soldier and Family Fitness (CSF2) Global Assessment Tool (GAT). METHODS: Subjects included 14,148 US Army Active, Reserve, and National Guard members (83.4% male) who completed the GAT, a self-report questionnaire that measures 4 fitness dimensions: social, family, emotional, and spiritual. Approximately 60 new questions, including ones on sleep quality, within the fifth CSF2 dimension (physical) were also answered. A sleep score was calculated from 2 questions validated in the Pittsburgh Insomnia Rating Scale (0 to 6). RESULTS: Poor sleepers (5-6) were significantly (P<.001) more likely than good sleepers (0-1) to consider themselves in fair or poor health, be overweight or obese, and score in the lowest quartile of the emotional, social, family, and spiritual fitness dimensions. Additionally, poor sleepers were significantly (P<.001) less likely to have a healthy body mass index and waist circumference, eat breakfast 6 or more times a week, meet aerobic exercise and resistance training recommendations, and pass their Army Physical Fitness Test in the top quartile. CONCLUSION: This study examined sleep quality in a group of military personnel and indicated significant associations between quality of sleep and physical performance, nutritional habits, measures of obesity, lifestyle behaviors and measures of psychosocial status. Targeted educational interventions and resources are needed to improve sleep patterns based on behaviors that can be most easily modified.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: October 01, 2013
  • Citation: Lentino CV, Purvis DL, Murphy KJ, Deuster PA. Sleep as a component of the performance triad: the importance of sleep in a military population. US Army Med Dep J. 2013 Oct-Dec:98-108
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