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The Military Health System (MHS) is an interconnected network of Service Members whose mission is to support the lives and families of those who support our country. Everyday in the MHS advancements are made in the lab, in the field, and here at home. These are just a few articles highlighting those accomplishments that don't always make it to the front page of local papers.

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Soldiers’ donated blood accompanies their units to deployment sites

Article
8/26/2016
Blood donated at the North Fort Hood Mobilization Center by mobilizing Soldiers  will be processed and shipped for use by service members in Kuwait, Afghanistan and other regions where U.S. forces are deployed. (U.S. Army photo by Nick Conner)

An ongoing program is helping mobilizing service members protect their health and safety during deployments

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program

Survival rates improving for Soldiers wounded in combat, says Army surgeon general

Article
8/26/2016
About 92 percent of Soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan have made it home alive. Soldiers in a tactical critical care evacuation team prepare for a patient transfer mission at Forward Operating Base Orgun East, Afghanistan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Marleah Miller)

About 92 percent of Soldiers wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan have made it home alive

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Health Readiness | Access to Health Care | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals) | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Health and fitness apps and wearables: Taking wellness to another level

Article
8/25/2016
Health and fitness apps and wearables are helping people become and stay healthy with detailed information on diet, workout intensity and hours of sleep.

Health and fitness apps and wearables are helping people become and stay healthy with detailed information on diet, workout intensity and hours of sleep.

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Health Readiness | Nutrition | Physical Activity

Navy Medicine ensures readiness, strengthens partnerships at Northern Lights

Article
8/25/2016
A litter team from Expeditionary Medical Force Great Lakes One performs triage on a casualty delivered by a U.S. Army HH-60 Blackhawk helicopter on Forward Operating Base Liberty during Exercise Northern Lights.

Sailors from 4th Medical Battalion and Expeditionary Medical Facilities Great Lakes One and Bethesda are participating in Combined Support Training Exercise Northern Lights

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Health Readiness

Airmen practice Ebola safety during Exercise Mobility Solace

Article
8/24/2016
A Transportation Isolation System is loaded onto a C-17 Globemaster III aircraft during Exercise Mobilty Solace at Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina.

Airmen flew an aeromedical evacuation of a simulated Ebola patient from Joint Base Charleston, South Carolina, to Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, during Exercise Mobility Solace

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Technology | Health Readiness | Ebola

Military health experts warn supplements are no shortcut for preventive health

Article
8/24/2016
Service members should use caution when consuming energy drinks due to their potential health risks and watch out for “stacking,” a term used when taking different products or supplements together.

Military people want to be able to perform better, especially when lives are on the line – but experts warn dietary supplements might not be the way to go

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Nutrition | Preventive Health

Army surgeon general predicts new tourniquet will save many lives

Article
8/23/2016
The U.S. Army Medical Materiel Agency is fielding a new junctional tourniquet designed to save Warfighters from bleeding to death on the battlefield. Junctional tourniquets are designed to stop the bleeding in the groin or armpit area where the Combat Application Tourniquet cannot be used. The junctional tourniquet is designed like a belt with air bladders that can be positioned in about 60 seconds – a crucial factor for combat medics who only have minutes to save a fellow Warfighter's life if he or she is hemorrhaging. (U.S. Army photo by Ellen Crown)

One of the latest advances in treating hemorrhaging on the battlefield is the "junctional tourniquet," which can be applied to wounds in ways not possible with conventional tourniquets

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Health Readiness | Innovation

Give concussions the red card

Article
8/23/2016
Mild TBI, also known as concussion, is especially common among girls. According to the Women’s Sports Foundation, “females participating in high school sports now have a higher incidence rate of sport-related concussions than do males.”

As soccer gains popularity in the United States and awareness of TBI grows, more eyes are on this potentially serious injury

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Physical Activity

Precision medicine offers individualized health care instead of “one-size-fits-all”

Article
8/23/2016
Dr. Mark Haigney discusses his views on precision medicine to researchers at the MHS Research Symposium on Aug. 17, 2016.

Precision medicine is an innovative approach that may revolutionize the way we improve health and treat diseases.

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Medical Research and Development | DoD/VA Sharing Initiatives

More “tainted” products

Article
8/22/2016
Dietary supplements don’t require FDA approval before being put on the market, and there is no way to know the contents of a product without laboratory testing. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration by Staff Sgt. Alexandre Montes)

Since July 2016, the Food and Drug Administration has released more than 25 public notifications about individual supplement that contain hidden active ingredients

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Human Performance Resource Center

U.S. medical team trains with Australian search and rescue crew

Article
8/22/2016
U.S. Navy Lt. Matthew Case, flight surgeon, and U.S. Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Juan Garcia, hospital corpsman, are hoisted into a Sikorsky S76A++ Search and Rescue helicopter while conducting SAR training during Exercise Pitch Black 2016 at Royal Australian Air Force Base Tindal, Australia. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Nicole Zurbrugg)

The U.S. medical team integrated with a RAAF SAR team to familiarize themselves with SAR procedures during a possible emergency during Exercise Pitch Black

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Health Readiness | Civil Military Medicine | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability | Partners

Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory plays a vital role in Korean and Cold War identification

Article
8/19/2016
Dave McClung, nephew of Marine Master Sgt. William McClung, gets his cheek swabbed for a family reference by Kerriann Meyers, Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory Past Accounting Section assistant technical leader. McClung was one of 51 family members to give a cheek swab during the briefings. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ashlin Federick)

The Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory collects, runs and controls a database of family reference samples for past conflicts

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Armed Forces Medical Examiner System | DNA Identifcation Laboratory

Immunization experts to adults: Vaccines are ‘not just for kids’

Article
8/19/2016
While it’s well known the good immunizations do, there are three vaccines of particular importance for military service members and their families. Military Health System officials want people to be more aware of vaccines for meningitis, the flu and shingles. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ridge Shan)

Immunization experts talk about the benefits of adult immunizations for flu, meningitis and shingles

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Immunization Healthcare | Preventive Health | Immunizations

TBI milestone: Research program enrolls 15,000 participants

Article
8/19/2016
DVBIC researchers have collected long-term TBI recovery and outcomes information on veterans through the Department of Veterans Affairs TBIMS program since 2008. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Miguel Lara III)

The database collects standardized recovery and outcomes data on patients with TBIs serious enough to require hospitalization

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Medical Research and Development

Breaking down blood: Plasma

Article
8/18/2016
Donors with type A, B or AB blood are often times good candidates to donate plasma. Type AB plasma is known as “universal plasma” which means that it can be received by anyone, regardless of their blood type. (U.S. Army photo by Nick Conner)

Donors with type A, B or AB blood are often times good candidates to donate plasma –type AB plasma is known as “universal plasma” which means that it can be received by anyone, regardless of their blood type

Recommended Content:

Armed Services Blood Program
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