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The Military Health System (MHS) is an interconnected network of Service Members whose mission is to support the lives and families of those who support our country. Everyday in the MHS advancements are made in the lab, in the field, and here at home. These are just a few articles highlighting those accomplishments that don't always make it to the front page of local papers.

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William Beaumont Army Medical Center rivals prestigious cancer centers

Article
5/1/2019
Army Maj. Daniel Nelson, surgical oncologist and director of the Commission on Cancer at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, instructs medical residents during a bilateral mastectomy at WBAMC. Nelson, the only board-certified surgical oncologist in El Paso, is one of many physicians with advanced medical training, along with WBAMC’s Commission on Cancer, preparing medical residents for unconventional cases they may experience throughout their careers. (U.S. Army photo By Marcy Sanchez)

William Beaumont Army Medical Center has more than a half century of experience in providing cancer care

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Military Hospitals and Clinics

Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, non-service member beneficiaries of the Military Health System, 2018

Article
5/1/2019
A senior airman of 366th Medical Support Squadron pediatric clinic checks vitals of the child of its service member at Mountain Home Air Force Base in Idaho. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Air Force)

In 2018, mental health disorders accounted for the largest proportions of the morbidity and healthcare burdens that affected the pediatric and younger adult beneficiary age groups. Among adults aged 45–64 years, musculoskeletal diseases accounted for the most morbidity and healthcare burdens, and among adults aged 65 years or older, cardiovascular diseases accounted for the most.

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, deployed active and reserve component service members, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Article
5/1/2019
A U.S. naval officer listens through his stethoscope to hear his patient’s lungs at Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan in 2018. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps) photo by Lance Cpl. Cameron Parks)

Among service members deployed during 2018, injury/poisoning, musculoskeletal diseases, and signs/symptoms accounted for more than half of the total healthcare burden while deployed. Compared to the distribution of major burden of disease categories documented in garrison, a relatively greater proportion of in-theater medical encounters due to respiratory infections, skin diseases, infectious/parasitic diseases, and digestive diseases was documented.

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Medical evacuations out of the U.S. Central Command, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Article
5/1/2019
Airmen from the 19th Medical Group litter-carry a simulated patient onto a C-130J during an aeromedical evacuation training mission at Little Rock Air Force Base in 2019. (Photo Courtesy of U.S. Air Force)

The number of medical evacuations for battle injuries has decreased considerably since 2014. Most medical evacuations in 2018 were attributed to mental health disorders, followed by non-battle injury/poisoning; signs, symptoms, and ill-defined conditions; musculoskeletal disorders; and digestive system disorders.

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Ambulatory visits, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Article
5/1/2019
A U.S. naval officer listens through his stethoscope to hear his patient’s lungs at Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan in 2018. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps) photo by Lance Cpl. Cameron Parks)

Musculoskeletal disorders and mental health disorders accounted for more than half (52.6%) of all illness- and injury-related ambulatory encounters among active component service members in 2018. Since 2014, the number of ambulatory visits for mental health disorders has decreased, while the numbers of ambulatory visits for musculoskeletal system/connective tissue disorders, nervous system and sense organ disorders, and respiratory system disorders have increased.

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Absolute and relative morbidity burdens attributable to various illnesses and injuries, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Article
5/1/2019
A U.S. naval officer listens through his stethoscope to hear his patient’s lungs at Camp Schwab in Okinawa, Japan in 2018. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Marine Corps) photo by Lance Cpl. Cameron Parks)

In 2018, mental health disorders accounted for the largest proportions of the morbidity and healthcare burdens that affected the pediatric and younger adult beneficiary age groups. Among adults aged 45–64 years, musculoskeletal diseases accounted for the most morbidity and healthcare burdens, and among adults aged 65 years or older, cardiovascular diseases accounted for the most.

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Surveillance Snapshot: Illness and Injury Burdens, Reserve Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Article
5/1/2019
U.S. Navy sailors graduate from boot camp at Recruit Training Command (RTC) in 2018. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy)

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Surveillance Snapshot: Illness and Injury Burdens, Recruit Trainees, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2018

Article
5/1/2019
U.S. Navy sailors graduate from boot camp at Recruit Training Command (RTC) in 2018. (Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy)

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Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Navy surgeon general addresses transition during visit to pacific northwest

Article
4/30/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Forrest Faison, Navy surgeon general and chief, Bureau of Medicine and Surgery takes time to share a few words with staff at Naval Hospital Bremerton's Urgent Care Clinic during his official visit at the command that included additional stops in the Pacific Northwest at Naval Health Clinic Oak Harbor and Madigan Army Medical Center. (U.S. Navy photo by Douglas Stutz)

Navy Medicine and military medicine is in the midst of immense change and transition

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Implementation of MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics

Preteens, teens target audience for HPV vaccine

Article
4/29/2019
Students from the Oceanside Unified School District enjoy team-building and mentoring activities at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California. Health care experts recommend the HPV vaccine for preteens and teens to protect against human papillomavirus, which is linked to several types of cancer. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Drake Nickels)

Inoculation has 'huge potential' to reduce cancer cases

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Children's Health | Public Health

Medical Airmen train in Puerto Rico during Vigilant Guard

Article
4/26/2019
Airmen and Soldiers from the 3rd Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Task Force, Pennsylvania National Guard, evacuate a casualty actor during the exercise Vigilant Guard, at Camp Santiago in Salinas, Puerto Rico. Members of the Pennsylvania and Puerto Rico National Guard worked together to provide joint disaster relief training. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Tony Harp)

Vigilant Guard is a U.S. Northern Command and National Guard Bureau sponsored event

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Health Readiness

Continuing TRICARE health coverage after retirement

Article
4/25/2019
Take Command of Your Health

When you retire from active duty or turn age 60 as a retired reserve member, your TRICARE coverage changes

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TRICARE Health Program

Field emergency room drills strengthen bonds of U.S. Navy, Swedish medics

Article
4/24/2019
Navy Cmdr. Mark Lambert (center) and Navy Hospital Corpsman 2nd Class Amos Bogs (right), work with Capt. Peter Landell (left), Swedish Armed Forces, during a multinational medical drill, Cincu Military Base, Romania, during exercise Vigorous Warrior 19. (U.S. Air Force photo by 1st Lt. Andrew Layton)

Vigorous Warrior is a biannual readiness event organized by the NATO Military Medicine Centre of Excellence

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Global Health Engagement

Pediatric medical services providers increase access to care for beneficiaries

Article
4/23/2019
Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Jason Caboot, pediatric pulmonologist, Madigan Army Medical Center, examines Jacob Schaff, an established pediatric specialty care patient at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Washington. The Schaff’s often find themselves traveling throughout the Puget Sound area to seek the specialty care Jacob requires. (U.S. Navy photo by Emily Yeh)

Pediatric medical services providers established a program that increases access to care for beneficiaries

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Military Hospitals and Clinics | Children's Health

Changes coming to military medical treatment facilities

Article
4/22/2019
Navy Vice Adm. Raquel Bono, Defense Health Agency director, speaks with members of the 42nd Medical Group about upcoming changes to military treatment facilities, at Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama. The DHA will be responsible for all facilities with respect to budgetary matters, information technology, health care administration and management, administrative policy and procedure and military medical construction. (U.S. Air Force photo by William Birchfield)

The DHA is as committed to the Air Force as the Air Force is to the DHA

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Implementation of MHS Transformation | Military Hospitals and Clinics
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