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Athlete’s foot is a common problem among military service members. Known by the medical term, Tinea Pedis, the condition causes a chronic fungal infection of the feet and toes. It is the most common dermatophyte infection among adults. Up to 25% of the global population is affected by tinea pedis at any given time. Findings: During the 17-year surveillance period there were a total of 193,432 medical encounters for tinea pedis. Of these total encounters, 91% were ambulatory visits. Of 459 hospitalization records that contained diagnoses of athlete’s foot during the surveillance period, a total of 275 (59.9%) had a primary diagnosis of cellulitis or abscess of the foot or leg during the incident tinea pedis hospitalization. Where this information displays two feet are seen. The pie chart shows in an orange pie slice the 59.9% or 275 military service members that had a primary diagnosis of cellulitis or abscess of the foot or leg during the incident tinea pedis hospitalization. The rest of the pie chart shows in purple the 184 other hospitalization records. Background of the pie chart shows a foot.  High Risks for tinea pedis infections: •	Males – overall incident rate 17.4% higher than females •	Service members younger than 20 years of age •	Black, non-Hispanic and Hispanic service members •	Junior enlisted service members Given these costs, prevention efforts such as training and education about foot and skin health warrant continual emphasis, especially during initial entry training and in preparation for field exercises and deployments to warm locations. Learn more at Health.mil/MSMR Top of image shows foot with tinea pedis (athlete’s foot).

This infographic summarizes the counts, rates, trends and demographic characteristics of diagnoses of tinea pedis among U.S. active component service members during 2000 -2016.

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