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Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a liver infection that can cause both acute and chronic disease in affected individuals. HBV is transmitted when the blood, serum or another body fluid from an infected individual enters the body of someone who is not infected. This report estimates the frequencies, incidence rates, trends, and correlates of risk of acute and chronic HBV infections among active component U.S. military members during 2007- 2016. Findings: During 2007 – 2016, there were 1,258 and 1,259 incident diagnoses of acute and chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, respectively. The overall incidence rates of both diagnoses were both 10.0 per 100,000 person-years (p-yrs.). 1 of 10 acute cases and nearly 1 of 5 chronic cases had at least 1 HBV-related hospitalization. The rates of hospitalized cases of acute hepatitis B decreased by 53.1% over the 10-year period. The graph shows the number of individuals diagnosed as bar graphs and incidence rates per 100,000 p-yrs. as line graphs. Key chart includes: blue for number of acute hepatitis B individuals, beige for number of chronic hepatitis B individuals, dash lines as rate of chronic hepatitis B incidence rates, and dotted line to show the acute hepatitis B incidence rates. High risk of acute hepatitis B:  •	Female •	Asian/Pacific Islander and non-Hispanic black service members •	Navy members •	Personnel working in healthcare occupations •	Recruits and service members with no history of deployment High risk of chronic hepatitis B: •	Female •	Asian/Pacific Islander, “Other” ethnicity, and non-Hispanic black service members •	Navy and Army service members •	Personnel working in healthcare occupations •	Non-recruit status Learn more about HBV infection in the U.S. military at Health.mil/MSMR Image of small male figure displays on the infographic and his liver is highlighted. Also pictured are male and female stick figures to depicting military members.

This infographic documents the frequencies, incidence rates, trends, and correlates of risk of acute and chronic HBV infections among active component U.S. military members during 2007-2016.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

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