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Global Health Engagement

The Department of Defense executes Global Health Engagement or "GHE" activities to establish and improve the capabilities of Partner Nations' military or civilian health sectors, or those of the DoD. 

Global Health Engagement Spotlight

DoD's GHE activities advance operational readiness and protect our troops, build interoperability so we can work more effectively with the armed forces of our partner nations, and enhance security cooperation so DoD can establish and maintain strong relationships around the world.  A key enabler to regional stability and security for DoD's combatant commands, GHE reduces risks to U.S. armed forces while fostering mission capability of partner nations' forces so that together, we can continue working effectively to defend global interests. 

Read more about the DoD's policy for Global Health Engagement

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Global respiratory surveillance program detects dangerous pathogens to keep armed forces healthy

Article
12/21/2017
Data from the Department of Defense Global Respiratory Pathogen Surveillance Program are presented to the Food and Drug Administration's annual Vaccine and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee meeting to help inform the vaccine strain in the U.S. for the upcoming season that is administered to U.S. Armed Forces for health protection and readiness. (Photo Courtesy of  Defense Imagery Management Operations Center)

To reduce the impact of respiratory pathogens on service members, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch coordinates a global respiratory surveillance program for the military. Learn how the program detects dangerous pathogens to keep armed forces healthy.

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Global Emerging Infections Surveillance | Respiratory Infections (RI) Surveillance | Global Health Engagement

U.S. Military HIV Research Program

Fact Sheet
12/8/2017

The U.S. Military HIV Research Program (MHRP) is at the forefront of the battle against HIV to protect U.S. troops from infection and to reduce the global impact of the disease.

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Global Health Engagement | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

Increasing Partner-Nation Capacity Through Global Health Engagement

Publication
12/6/2017

GHE operations, activities, and actions (OAA) are used to implement the Secretary of Defense Policy Guidance for DoD GHE and the U.S. Army Medicine 2017 Campaign Plan in direct support of the U.S. Pacific Command (USPACOM) theater campaign plan (TCP) and U.S. Army Pacific (USARPAC) theater campaign support plan.

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Global Health Engagement | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability

Trauma Care in Support of Global Military Operations

Publication
12/6/2017

The Department of Defense (DoD) Joint Trauma System (JTS) revolutionized combat casualty care by creating a trauma system for the battlefield.

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Global Health Engagement | Force Health Protection

AFHSB's health surveillance program supports Defense Department global health engagement efforts

Article
11/30/2017
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Joshua Douglass, left, an aerospace medical technician, watches as Liberian health care workers properly put on their personal protective equipment as part response by the Defense Department operation to provide logistics, training and engineering support during the Ebola virus outbreak. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Terrance D. Rhodes)

Navy Commander Franca R. Jones, chief of the Global Emerging Infections section at the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch (AFHSB) discusses how AFHSB's health surveillance program supports the Defense Department global health engagement efforts.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Global Emerging Infections Surveillance | Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR) Surveillance | Febrile and Vector-Borne Infections (FVBI) Surveillance | Enteric Infections (EI) Surveillance | GEIS Partners | Global Health Engagement | Global Health Engagement

DoD Medical Professionals Engage with Partner Nations in Singapore during APMHE 2017

Article
11/29/2017
Global Health Engagement

Medical professionals and leaders from across the Department of Defense engaged with partner nation colleagues while participating in the Asia Pacific Military Health Exchange 17 (APMHE) in Singapore May 23-26.

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Global Health Engagement

U.S. Department of Defense Continued Support to the Global Health Security Agenda: Updates from Korea

Article
11/29/2017
Left to right: LTC Seungwoo Park, Republic of Korea MND, MG Ben Yura Rimba, Indonesia TNI, and Dr. J. Christopher Daniel, U.S. DoD.

In late July, the Global Health Security Agenda (link is external) (GHSA) Steering Group (link is external), chaired by the Republic of Korea, convened in Seoul to discuss ongoing implementation of the GHSA (link is external)

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Strengthening capabilities, fostering partnership top priorities at global health summit

Article
10/27/2017
Admiral Tim Ziemer, head of U.S. delegation, giving remarks at the Global Health Security Agenda Ministerial Meeting in Kampala, Uganda.

A growing partnership of more than 60 nations is working to build countries’ capacity to help create a world safe and secure from infectious disease threats and elevate global health security

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Review of the U.S. Military’s Human Immunodeficiency Virus program: A legacy of the progress and a future of promise

Infographic
10/3/2017
HIV infection is a threat of the Department of Defense (DoD) because sexually active service members and their beneficiaries are stationed throughout the U.S. and around the globe, including in areas with high rates of HIV transmission. Fortunately, blood testing and a negative test result for HIV infection are required for entry into military service. All U.S. military service members must undergo testing for HIV infection every 2 years. As a result, the incidence and prevalence of HIV in the DoD remains much lower than in the U.S. civilian population.

This infographic documents the incidence and prevalence of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) among service members, active and reserve components, of the U.S. Armed Forces, 1990 – 2017.

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HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

DoD Instruction 2000.30: Global Health Engagement Activities

Policy

This instruction establishes policy, assigns responsibilities, and prescribes procedures for the conduct of global health engagement activities with partner nation (PN) entities.

Routine Screening for HIV Antibodies Among Male Civilian Applicants

Infographic
3/24/2017
This graphic shows the results of routine screening for antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among both male civilian applicants for U.S. military service and male service members of the U.S. Armed Forces, active component - Army during  January 2015 through June 2016 surveillance period. 368,369 males out of 463,132 civilian applicants for U.S. military service were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 124 civilian applicants that were HIV positive, 114 were male. Throughout the period, seroprevalences were much higher among males than females.  As for U.S. Armed Forces active component, 467,011 male service members out of 548,974 were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 120 soldiers that were HIV positive 117 were male. Annual seroprevalences for male active component Army members greatly exceed those of females. During the 2015, on average, one new HIV infection was detected among active duty army soldiers per 5,265 screening tests.  HIV-1 is the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. Of 515 active component soldiers diagnosed with HIV infections since 2011, a total of 291 (57%) were still in the military. Get tested and learn more by reading the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report at Health.Mil/MSMR.

Since October 1985, the U.S. military has conducted routine screening for antibodies to Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to enable adequate, timely medical evaluations, treatment and counseling, and protect the battlefield blood supply. This infographic provides information on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among male civilian applicants of the U.S. Military Service and U.S. Armed Forces, January 2011 – June 2016.

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Routine Screening for Antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus

Infographic
3/17/2017
The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides an update on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among civilian applicants for the U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces during a January 2011 - June 2016 surveillance period.  Since October 1985, the U.S. military has conducted routine screening for antibodies to HIV-1 to enable adequate and timely medical evaluations, treatment and counseling; to prevent unwitting transmission; and protect the battlefield blood supply. From January 2015 through June 2016, 463,132 civilian applicants for U.S. military service were tested. 124 were identified as HIV antibody positive. During 2015, one was detected with antibodies to HIV per 3,267 screening tests. Annual seroprevalences peaked in 2015, up 29% from 2014. The seroprevalences were much higher among males than females and among black, non-Hispanics than other race/ethnicity groups. Seroprevalences decreased by approximately 26% among male applicants, dropped to zero among female applicants, and decreased by 43% among black, non-Hispanic applicants.  As for the active component of the U.S. Army, 548,974 soldiers were tested from January 2015 through June 2016. 120 were identified as HIV antibody positive. During 2015, one was detected with antibodies to HIV per 5,265 screening tests. Of the 515 active component soldiers diagnosed with HIV infections since 2011, a total of 291 (57%) were still in military service in 2016. Annual seroprevalences for male active component Army members greatly exceed those of females.  Among active and reserve component service members, seroprevalences continue to be higher among Army and Navy members and males than their respective counterparts. Service members who are infected with HIV receive clinical assessments, treatments, and counseling; they may remain in service as long as they are capable of performing their military duties. Learn more at Health.mil/AFHSB

The Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides an update on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among civilian applicants for the U.S. military service and U.S. Armed Forces during a January 2011 - June 2016 surveillance period.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

March 10 is National Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Infographic
3/3/2017
This graphic shows the results of routine screening for antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among both female civilian applicants for U.S. military service and female service members of the U.S. Armed Forces, active component - Army during  January 2015 through June 2016 surveillance period. 94,763 females out of 463,132 civilian applicants for U.S. military service were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 124 civilian applicants that were HIV positive, 10 were female. Throughout the period, seroprevalences were much higher among males than females.  During 2015 – 2016 seroprevalences dropped to zero among female applicants.  As for U.S. Armed Forces active component, 81,963 female service members out of 548,974 were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 120 soldiers that were HIV positive 3 were female. Annual seroprevalences for male active component Army members greatly exceed those of females. During the 2015, on average, one new HIV infection was detected among active duty army soldiers per 5,265 screening tests.  HIV-1 is the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. Of 515 active component soldiers diagnosed with HIV infections since 2011, a total of 291 (57%) were still in the military. Get tested and learn more by reading the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report at Health.Mil/MSMR.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides information on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among female civilian applicants of the U.S. Military Service and U.S. Armed Forces, January 2011 – June 2016.

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Exercise Immediate Response 16

Video
1/13/2017
Soldiers and Airmen practice combat trauma care with allied and partner nation medical service members at Cerklje ob Krki, Slovenia, as part of exercise Immediate Response.

Soldiers and Airmen practice combat trauma care with allied and partner nation medical service members at Cerklje ob Krki, Slovenia, as part of exercise Immediate Response.

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Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement

ENT Palau medical care

Photo
11/3/2016
Anthony Tolisano, chief resident with the Tripler Army Medical Center's Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, inserts tubes into a child's ear drum to drain the fluid build-up in his ear. Tolisano was in Palau as part of a mission requested by the Palau Ministry of Health to provide specialty care to the people of the island nation. (U.S. Army photo by William Sallette)

Anthony Tolisano, chief resident with the Tripler Army Medical Center's Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, inserts tubes into a child's ear drum to drain the fluid build-up in his ear. Tolisano was in Palau as part of a mission requested by the Palau Ministry of Health to provide specialty care to the people of the island nation. (U.S. Army photo by William Sallette)

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Global Health Engagement
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