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Global Health Engagement

The Department of Defense executes Global Health Engagement or "GHE" activities to establish and improve the capabilities of Partner Nations' military or civilian health sectors, or those of the DoD. 

Global Health Engagement Spotlight

DoD's GHE activities advance operational readiness and protect our troops, build interoperability so we can work more effectively with the armed forces of our partner nations, and enhance security cooperation so DoD can establish and maintain strong relationships around the world.  A key enabler to regional stability and security for DoD's combatant commands, GHE reduces risks to U.S. armed forces while fostering mission capability of partner nations' forces so that together, we can continue working effectively to defend global interests. 

Read more about the DoD's policy for Global Health Engagement

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March 10 is National Women & Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Infographic
3/3/2017
This graphic shows the results of routine screening for antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among both female civilian applicants for U.S. military service and female service members of the U.S. Armed Forces, active component - Army during  January 2015 through June 2016 surveillance period. 94,763 females out of 463,132 civilian applicants for U.S. military service were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 124 civilian applicants that were HIV positive, 10 were female. Throughout the period, seroprevalences were much higher among males than females.  During 2015 – 2016 seroprevalences dropped to zero among female applicants.  As for U.S. Armed Forces active component, 81,963 female service members out of 548,974 were tested for antibodies to HIV. Out of 120 soldiers that were HIV positive 3 were female. Annual seroprevalences for male active component Army members greatly exceed those of females. During the 2015, on average, one new HIV infection was detected among active duty army soldiers per 5,265 screening tests.  HIV-1 is the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. Of 515 active component soldiers diagnosed with HIV infections since 2011, a total of 291 (57%) were still in the military. Get tested and learn more by reading the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report at Health.Mil/MSMR.

Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) is the cause of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and has had major impacts on the health of populations and on healthcare systems worldwide. This infographic provides information on routine screening for antibodies to HIV among female civilian applicants of the U.S. Military Service and U.S. Armed Forces, January 2011 – June 2016.

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Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

Exercise Immediate Response 16

Video
1/13/2017
Exercise Immediate Response 16

Soldiers and Airmen practice combat trauma care with allied and partner nation medical service members at Cerklje ob Krki, Slovenia, as part of exercise Immediate Response.

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Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement

ENT Palau medical care

Photo
11/3/2016
Anthony Tolisano, chief resident with the Tripler Army Medical Center's Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, inserts tubes into a child's ear drum to drain the fluid build-up in his ear. Tolisano was in Palau as part of a mission requested by the Palau Ministry of Health to provide specialty care to the people of the island nation. (U.S. Army photo by William Sallette)

Anthony Tolisano, chief resident with the Tripler Army Medical Center's Ear, Nose and Throat Clinic, inserts tubes into a child's ear drum to drain the fluid build-up in his ear. Tolisano was in Palau as part of a mission requested by the Palau Ministry of Health to provide specialty care to the people of the island nation. (U.S. Army photo by William Sallette)

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Global Health Engagement

Innovations from a Global Health Engagement and Rapid Response during Ebola virus outbreak

Presentation
11/1/2016

Innovations from a Global Health Engagement and Rapid Response during the 2013-2015 Western African Ebola virus outbreak. Briefing to the Defense Health Board, Nov. 1, 2016.

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Global Health Engagement

Department of Defense continues commitment to Global Health Security Agenda

Article
10/12/2016
Dr. Karen Guice, acting assistant secretary of Defense for Health Affairs, addressed attendees on the second day of the 2016 Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Summit Sept. 14, 2016.

Department of Defense and other senior U.S. government leaders travel to the Netherlands to attend a summit on the Global Health Security Agenda

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Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement | Building Partner Capacity and Interoperability | Global Health Security Agenda | Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch

2016-2017 Department of Defense Influenza Surveillance Program Sentinel Sites

Policy

The DoD Global, Laboratory-based, Influenza Surveillance Program, at USAFSAM selects military treatment facilities (MTFs) from worldwide locations to participate as Sentinel Sites. Installations are selected annually based on mission, population, deployment/operations tempo and type, and geographic location. Particular focus is on impact to critical operations, highly heterogeneous, mobile populations, potential for new strain production, and past performance. The 2016-2017 Sentinel Site listing (attached) was approved by the USAFSAM team in April 2016, in committee, and has remained unchanged for 2 years.

HIV and AIDS in the U.S. Military

Infographic
6/27/2016
June 27th is National HIV Testing Day. HIV-1 infection is a major health importance for the U.S. military. Since the start of HIV-1 military health surveillance analysis during 1990-2013, service members diagnosed with the HIV-1 infection in recent years have remained longer in U.S. Armed Forces.  There were a total of 5,227 new diagnoses in 24-years of surveillance. The August 2015 Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) reported that “Estimated median durations of service after initial HIV-1 diagnoses ranged from 2.29 years in Cohort 1 ( 1990-1994) to 3.65 years in Cohort 4 (2005-2009). Thus, in the 15 years between 1990-1994 and 2005-2009, the median durations of service after HIV-1 diagnoses increased by 1.4 years.” Factors contributing to longer service include: •	Availability and effectiveness of HIV treatments •	Decline in stigmas associated with diagnosis of the HIV infection •	Changes in U.S. military policy that allow the LGBT community to serve in its ranks  Note: Service members who are diagnosed with HIV-1 infections, regardless of their sexual orientations, may elect to continue their military service careers.  Get tested today – it’s the only way to know. Early HIV testing helps to prevent transmission and lowers the risk of severe health complications. Follow us on Twitter for more information: @AFHSBPAGE  Also on Twitter: National HIV Testing Day #NHTD

June 27th is National HIV Testing Day. HIV-1 infection is a major health importance for the U.S. military. Since the start of HIV-1 military health surveillance analysis during 1990-2013, service members diagnosed with the HIV-1 infection in recent years have remained longer in U.S. Armed Forces.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | HIV/AIDS Prevention and Treatment

How is the U.S. Military Dealing with Zika?

Video
6/7/2016
Zika image

The Defense Department is closely monitoring the spread of the Zika virus and is working with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to assist in virus surveillance, response and research efforts.

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Zika Virus | Global Health Engagement | Mosquito-Borne Illnesses

MHS supports Global Health Security Agenda through its Force Health Protection Mission

Article
1/29/2016
U.S. Government Global Health Security Agenda Partners

For nearly two decades, the Military Health System has supported global public health surveillance to protect its forces and allies

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Global Health Engagement | Pandemic Diseases | Global Health Security Agenda

U.S. Government Global Health Security Agenda Partners

Photo
1/29/2016
U.S. Government Global Health Security Agenda Partners

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Pandemic Diseases | Global Health Engagement

Global Health Engagement Month #3

Infographic
12/29/2015
infographic for global health engagement

A healthy partner is a stable partner! Supporting partner nations' health system capacities is a critical element of global health engagement.

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Health Readiness | Global Health Engagement

Global Health Engagement Month #2

Infographic
12/14/2015
Inforgraphic for Global Health Engagement Month

Helping partner nations to build and sustain their health system capacities promotes health security around the world. Global health engagement helps to prevent, detect, and respond to biological threats before they develop into global public health issues.

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Global Health Engagement | Force Health Protection

Global Health Engagement Month #1

Infographic
12/7/2015
Infographic about Global Health Engagement

Global Health Engagement supports Force Health Protection through vaccines and medical countermeasures, active surveillance of emerging infectious diseases and engagement with partner nations.

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Global Health Engagement | Force Health Protection

Global Health Engagement

Presentation
2/11/2015

Global Health Engagement: Smart Power in Defense, Brief for the Defense Health Board by Dr. David Smith

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Global Health Engagement

DoD Directives 6485.02E: DoD Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Prevention Program (DHAPP) to Support Foreign Militaries

Policy

This directive reissues DoD Directive (DoDD) 6485.02E (Reference (a)) to establish policy and assign responsibilities for DHAPP to support foreign militaries pursuant to Public Law 110-293 (Reference (b)); designates the Secretary of the Navy as the DoD Executive Agent (EA) for DHAPP in accordance with DoDD 5101.1 (Reference (c)); updates the responsibilities for the Coordinating Board for DHAPP (referred to in this directive as the Coordinating Board (CB)), consistent with DoD Instruction (DoDI) 5105.18 (Reference (d)).

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