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Month of the Military Child

DoD has designated April the Month of the Military Child, since 1986, recognizing the contributions and personal sacrifices that military children make.  Additionally, it is important for our deployed service members to be reassured that their loved ones are receiving the care they need while a parent is away. 

Spotlight Image for the month of the military child. Image of a child wearing her parent's fatigues and the words "April is Month of the Military Child."

The Defense Department has designated April the Month of the Military Child, since 1986, recognizing the contributions and personal sacrifices that military children make.  This month, we will focus on providing information to our military parents that help them support resiliency in their children, alert them to programs the MHS offers to improve children’s health and fitness and provide tools to help parents teach kids how to “take command” of their own health and fitness by adopting healthy habits. We will also recognize the important role military children play in helping our service members achieve their mission by contributing to the strength of the military family. 

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Midori Robinson, Kyleigh Rose and Keisha McNeill paint their hands so they can put a handprint on the “Love is Respect” mural during the Camp Zama Youth Center Teen Dating Violence Awareness Lock-In at Camp Zama. (U.S. Army photo by Winifred Brown)

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Award-winning Navy team successfully improves care for women, infants

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Labor and Delivery providers were the front-line adopters of the Induction of Labor care pathway at Naval Medical Center San Diego. As of July 2019, over 80 percent of the hospital’s providers were using the pathway. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joseph A. Boomhower)

An award-winning team of nurses successfully implemented a treatment guide at Naval Medical Center San Diego that improves labor and delivery outcomes

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Measles Myths: The Measles Can Be Life-Threatening

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Measles Myths: The Measles Can Be Life-Threatening

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Measles Myths: Hand Washing Alone Won't Prevent Measles

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A surprise delivery at Fort Bragg’s maternity fair

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Pamela Riis (in pink the pink top) learns more about the use of nitrous oxide during labor at the semiannual Fort Bragg Maternity Fair. More than 300 pregnant women, soon-to-be dads, parents of infants, and those planning to have a baby soon participated in the event. (U.S. Army photo by Patricia Beal)

For Linda Steadman, a certified nursing assistant, this will be a day to remember

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Measles Myths: Vaccines Are Safe

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Measles Myths: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

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Measles Myths: Vaccines Do Not Cause Autism

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Five tips for back-to-school vaccinations

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U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Ayla Soltren, a 5th Battalion Army Reserve Career Division counselor, collects school supplies with her daughter, Lana, at a Back to School Info Fair hosted by the 6th Force Support Squadron at MacDill Air Force Base, Fla., Aug. 3, 2019. Another tradition of the season is making sure vaccinations are up to date to keep students healthy and protected. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ryan C. Grossklag)

Keeping children up-to-date on vaccinations protects them from vaccine-preventable infections that can be spread throughout schools and day care centers.

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Get kids ready for back to school with preventive health care

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Don’t wait to take command of your children’s health. Prioritize preventive exams and vaccinations before the school year begins. Preventive services, routine immunizations, and health screenings are the best ways to make sure your kids are healthy and ready to hit the books. (U.S. Air Force photo by L.A. Shively)

Preventive services, routine immunizations, and health screenings are the best ways to make sure your kids are healthy and ready to hit the books

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Teddy bear health clinic

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A corpsman teaches a child how stethoscopes work. During the Teddy Bear Health Clinic, children received a teddy bear, went from station to station making sure their new friend was healthy. The bears received patient identification bracelets, had their blood pressure taken, their hearts listened to, hearing tested, and even experienced an x-ray. The goal was to introduce children to different departments in the hospital and help alleviate any anxiety during future appointments or potential hospital stays. (U.S. Navy photo by Christina Clarke)

The clinic went through six boxes of teddy bears in just two hours

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Mother's Day a chance to highlight care in the Military Health System

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The Nunns with daughter Sabella and son Gideon. (Courtesy file photo)

The Military Health System helps deliver more than 100,000 babies each year

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DHA PI 6025.16: Processes and Procedures for Implementation of Standardized Perinatal Training

Policy

This Defense Health Agency-Procedural Instruction (DHA-PI), based on the authority of References (a) and (b), and in accordance with the guidance of References (c) through (p), establishes the Defense Health Agency’s (DHA) procedures to describe standard processes and criteria for developing and sustaining comprehensive systems to provide, assess, and monitor standardized perinatal training for military medical personnel providing services to mothers and infants.

  • Identification #: 6025.16
  • Date: 4/30/2019
  • Type: DHA Procedural Instruction
  • Topics: Children's Health

Preteens, teens target audience for HPV vaccine

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Students from the Oceanside Unified School District enjoy team-building and mentoring activities at Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California. Health care experts recommend the HPV vaccine for preteens and teens to protect against human papillomavirus, which is linked to several types of cancer. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Drake Nickels)

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Pediatric medical services providers increase access to care for beneficiaries

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Army Lt. Col. (Dr.) Jason Caboot, pediatric pulmonologist, Madigan Army Medical Center, examines Jacob Schaff, an established pediatric specialty care patient at Naval Hospital Bremerton, Washington. The Schaff’s often find themselves traveling throughout the Puget Sound area to seek the specialty care Jacob requires. (U.S. Navy photo by Emily Yeh)

Pediatric medical services providers established a program that increases access to care for beneficiaries

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DHA ‘delivers’ nurses for babies

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Air Force Col. Michelle Aastrom, 81st Inpatient Operation Squadron commander, discusses the intensive care unit capabilities with Army Maj. Gen. Ronald Place, Defense Health Agency, director, for the National Capital Region Medical Directorate and Transition Intermediate Management Organization, during an immersion tour inside the Keesler Medical Center at Keesler Air Force Base, Mississippi, recently. The purpose of Place's two-day visit was to become more familiar with the medical center's mission capabilities and to receive the status of the 81st Medical Group's transition under DHA. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Every month Keesler Medical Center’s Labor and Delivery Clinic averages approximately 35 births

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