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Suicide Prevention Month 2019

The Department of Defense (DoD) and the Military Health System (MHS) observe Suicide Prevention Month 2019 to increase awareness about behavioral health care services and promote and enhance suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention for service members and their families. Our goal is to reduce stigma and increase awareness in order to facilitate help-seeking behaviors. MHS will highlight that strength and resilience are possible through support networks and the use of DoD and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) resources. 

Suicide Prevention Month

Suicide Prevention Month is a prime opportunity for the U.S. Department of Defense and the Military Health System to raise public awareness of suicide risk among Service members, Veterans and beneficiaries.

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Peterson Airmen save life

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Airmen 1st Class Brittany Wright and Tiffany Duffus, 21st Operational Medical Readiness Squadron dental lab technicians, tell their story of successfully responding to a friend with suicidal thoughts Aug. 22, 2019 at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado. Both Airmen received the Air Force Achievement Medal and were asked to attend the Air Force Association National Convention in September. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Alexandra M. Longfellow)

Two Airmen from the 21st Operational Medical Readiness Squadron dental lab, successfully responded to a friend from another Air Force base with suicidal thoughts.

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Suicide Prevention Month: Changing the narrative

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Mental health technicians say one major way to change the cycle is to use success stories

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I learned how to retrain my brain to manage chronic pain

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New clinical recommendations on cognitive rehabilitation for TBI released

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Dr. Gregory Johnson (right), Tripler Concussion Clinic medical director, has Army Spc. Andrew Karamatic, Department of Medicine combat medic, follow his finger with his eyes during a neurologic exam at Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Christopher Hubenthal)

Cognitive rehabilitation focuses on improving thinking and communication skills

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Practicing yoga to stimulate the mind, body, spirit

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Dr. Bhagwan Bahroo, staff psychiatrist, demonstrates a deep-breathing posture as he leads a weekly yoga class for Psychiatry Continuity Service Program participants at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. (DoD photo by Leigh Culbert)

Programs at Walter Reed incorporate yoga basics to promote healing

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DoD officials urge troops to seek mental health help without fear

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One problem that may contribute to suicide numbers is a reticence to seek assistance from mental health providers due to fears that such help may damage careers, especially when it comes to security clearances. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Demetrio Montoya)

Solving suicide is a shared challenge in both the military and civilian societies

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Stress relief a touch screen away

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Dr. Tim Hoyt, chief of the DHA Connected Health Branch, described Breathe2Relax and the Virtual Hope Box as coping tools in the pockets of deployed service members. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ryan Lackey)

Help is within reach with military apps

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Breaking the pain cycle

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Study's focus: Mending hearts broken by deaths of military loved ones

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Young military family members at a Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors Good Grief Camp in Denver, Colorado, created this collage to memorialize their lost loved ones. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez)

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It's complicated: Our relationship with social media

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An Army health care provider loads the T2 Mood Tracker mobile app on a mobile device for a demonstration for his patients. (DoD photo)

Social media can help connect and reconnect people; however, it may increase feelings of isolation or remind people of what they don’t have

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Suicide prevention: Eliminating the stigma

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