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The NICoE: Ten years of Healing ‘The Invisible Wounds of War’

Article
6/30/2020
Image of man hooked up to machine and walking on treadmill

10 years of TBI, PTS care

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Centers of Excellence

The Language of Anger and Depression Among Patients with Concussions

Article
6/4/2020
Image of naval captain talking to another military person

Soldiers often do not overtly express their feelings of depression.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Anger | Depression

Improving training of healthcare providers boosts post-concussion care

Article
3/24/2020
Elizabeth Fuentes (left), physical therapist assistant, Fort Bliss Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, provides information and educates medical professionals about TBI symptoms, treatments and assessments, during the TBI Clinic’s open house event, in observance of Brain Injury Awareness Month. (U.S. Army photo by Marcy Sanchez)

This study highlights the importance of integrating research, clinical affairs, and education activities at DVBIC

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Caring for the caregivers of TBI patients

Article
3/16/2020
Shundra Johnson, left, gives encouragement to her husband Coast Guard Lt. Sancho Johnson during the Navy’s wounded warrior training camp for the 2015 DoD Warrior Games in Port Hueneme, Calif., May 29, 2015. Shundra is also her husband’s caregiver. (DoD News photo by EJ Hersom)

A new tool, developed by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, could allow health care providers to assess the burdens on caregivers and develop treatments to meet their needs

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Female, male service members, veterans recover from concussion differently

Article
3/6/2020
At an informal celebration at the AFWERX Vegas Innovation Hub earlier this month, U.S. Air Force personnel took delivery of four helmet designs that may each represent the next generation of fixed-wing aircrew equipment. In just nine months, the AFWERX innovations process generated tangible products for further Air Force testing and development. (U.S. Air Force photo by Nathan Riddle)

Female veterans may have a harder time performing some mental tasks after a mild traumatic brain injury or concussion

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Traumatic Brain Injury | Women's Health | Men's Health

Brain Injury Awareness Month raises awareness of TBI in the military

Article
3/2/2020
The Department of Defense and the Military Health System recognizes March each year as Brain Injury Awareness Month to increase awareness of traumatic brain injuries, and the Department’s efforts to improve its ability to identify, care for, and treat service members and veterans who are affected by TBI. (MHS graphic)

A division of the Defense Health Agency Research and Development Directorate, DVBIC is the DoD’s TBI center of excellence

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Traumatic Brain Injury | TBI Resources

Joint Staff doctor explains TBI diagnosis procedures

Article
2/26/2020
An Airman searches for salvageable items after missile attacks at Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, Jan. 12, 2020. At a Pentagon news conference, Air Force Brig. Gen. (Dr.) Paul Friedrichs, the Joint Staff Surgeon, said 110 service members have been diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injuries from the attack. Most have returned to duty, while 25 returned to the United States for further treatment, he said, and six more are still undergoing testing. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Derek Mustard)

A TBI takes time to diagnose, and the process is involved

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Celebrates 25 Years

Video
3/12/2018
Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Celebrates 25 Years

Katherine Helmick, DVBIC acting national director, discusses DVBIC achievements and goals to advance service members' health care. DVBIC honors 25 years of military health care by continued dedication to research and treatment of traumatic brain injury.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Diagnoses of Traumatic Brain Injury Not Clearly Associated with Deployment, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001 – 2016

Infographic
4/4/2017
Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is structural alteration of the brain or physiological disruption of brain function caused by an external force.  TBI, particularly mild TBI or concussion, is the most common traumatic injury in the U.S. military. This analysis provides the estimated rates of incident TBIs among service members before their first-ever deployment as well as separately among service members during deployments/ after deployments. It also mentions factors that may explain why the TBI incidence rates among the previously deployed were higher than those of the never-deployed group. Moreover, it describes the demographic and military traits of service members diagnosed as TBI cases (before/after deployment). Categorization of person time during surveillance period included four categories: Group 1 (Never deployed/TBI before first-ever deployment), Group 2 (Currently deployed or within 30 days of return), Group 3 (previously deployed but not currently deployed nor within 30 days of return) and Censored after Diagnosis of TBI. From 2001-2016, 276,858 active component service members received first-time diagnoses of TBI. The crude overall incidence rate of TBI among deployed service members was 1.5 times that of service members assigned to Group 1 and 1.2 times that of service members in Group 3 during the surveillance period.  Total TBI cases by group were Group 1 42.8%, Group 2 13.2% and Group 3 44.0%. Incidence rates by group (per 100,000 person-years) were Group 1 1,141.3, Group 2 1,690.5, and Group 3 1,451.2. Learn more at www.Health.mil/MSMR and see fact sheets at www.Health.mil/AFHSB

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) is structural alteration of the brain or physiological disruption of brain function caused by an external force. TBI, particularly mild TBI or concussion, is the most common traumatic injury in the U.S. military. This analysis provides the estimated rates of incident TBIs among service members before their first-ever deployment as well as separately among service members during deployments/ after deployments. It also mentions factors that may explain why the TBI incidence rates among the previously deployed were higher than those of the never-deployed group. Moreover, it describes the demographic and military traits of service members diagnosed as TBI cases (before/after deployment).

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Exiting an A-10C Thunderbolt

Photo
9/30/2016
U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Judith Bulkley, an electrical and environmental systems specialist deployed from the 23rd Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Moody Air Force Base, Ga., exits an A-10C Thunderbolt II after performing an external power operations check on the aircraft at Kandahar Airfield, Afghanistan. Because service members in particular are often exposed to high noise levels, hearing protection is crucial, especially with a TBI. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Stephen Schester)

Recommended Content:

Hearing and Balance Injuries | Traumatic Brain Injury

The impact of traumatic brain injuries on community life

Photo
9/27/2016
A soldier at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s traumatic brain injury clinic in Alaska takes a cognitive hand-eye coordination test on a driving stimulator.

A soldier at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson’s traumatic brain injury clinic in Alaska takes a cognitive hand-eye coordination test on a driving stimulator.

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Traumatic Brain Injury

Public Health Service Cmdr. Robin Toblin speaks at TBI Summit

Photo
9/21/2016
Public Health Service Cmdr. Robin Toblin with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research was one of the more than 1,700 health care providers and policy makers from the Military Health System, the Department of Veterans Affairs, academia and commercial research companies who met in person and virtually during the recent Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Summit held at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia. (DCoE photo by Terry Welch)

Public Health Service Cmdr. Robin Toblin with the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research was one of the more than 1,700 health care providers and policy makers from the Military Health System, the Department of Veterans Affairs, academia and commercial research companies who met in person and virtually during the recent Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury Summit held at the Defense Health Headquarters in Falls Church, Virginia. (DCoE photo by Terry Welch)

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Technician Discusses TBI Research

Video
5/20/2016
Photo of an Edgerton Shadowgraph, a technique which allows researchers to visualize shockwaves in a transparent medium so they can see the shockwaves in the air. Upon visualizing the shockwaves, researchers can measure their locations and use the timing from high-speed video cameras to determine a velocity, which is critical in indicating the shockwave’s pressure. Once researchers have all this information, they can tell the pressure impacted on the test subject. (DoD photo)

Richard Benjamin, lead physical science technician at the Army Research Laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md., discusses using technology to better understand traumatic brain injuries.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

A Head for the Future: Randy Gross

Video
3/25/2016
Randy Gross

When he was 23, Randy Gross was riding in a car with his seat belt off. The former Army staff sergeant sustained a TBI when the vehicle crashed. He sought help immediately, making a full recovery from his TBI and continuing to serve in the Army until 2006. Now, Gross helps those in the military with TBI as a regional education coordinator for DVBIC.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury

Head for the future

Video
3/14/2016
Woman putting on bike helmet

In 2005, a car struck Marine reservist Maj. Eve Baker head-on while she was biking to work in Honolulu. She flew face-first into the windshield, shattering her helmet — which likely saved her life.

Recommended Content:

Traumatic Brain Injury
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