Back to Top Skip to main content

Search Results

If you're having trouble finding what you're looking for, consider using fewer words in your search criteria. Results are limited to content that matches all terms in the search field.

Focus your search by selecting the types of content you are looking for:

Taking care of your heart with TRICARE benefits

Article
2/19/2019
February is nationally recognized as American Heart Month, a time for the Department of Defense community to show its love for healthy living.

Getting preventive screenings now could save your life tomorrow

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Preventive Health

Cardiovascular Screenings 2019

Infographic
1/30/2019
This infographic discusses the types of tests that cardiovascular screenings usually include

This infographic discusses the types of tests that cardiovascular screenings usually include.

Prevent Heart Disease 2019

Infographic
1/30/2019
This infographic describes conditions that can increase your chance of having heart disease

This infographic describes conditions that can increase your chance of having heart disease.

Focus on prevention … not the cure for heart disease

Article
2/21/2018
Navy Lt. Cmdr. Cecily Dye is chief cardiologist at Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. (U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Nicholas N. Lopez)

Many heart health problems can be avoided

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Heart Health | Preventive Health

Lose to win: Some service members struggle with weight

Article
2/7/2018
Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Jovanei Taito, shown here receiving his information warfare qualification certificate, credits the ShipShape program for enabling him to pass the Navy's body composition and physical fitness assessments.  (Courtesy photo)

With numbers rising, programs help keep you shipshape

Recommended Content:

Health Readiness | Heart Health

Heart Health Month: Stopping the number-one killer

Article
2/1/2018
Going to the gym regularly can certainly improve heart health. So can taking a walk or using the stairs instead of the elevator. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Matthew Lancaster)

Learn about the small changes that can make a big difference in your overall health

Recommended Content:

Physical Activity | Heart Health

Men's Health: Heart disease

Article
6/27/2017
A blue 3D drawing of a human heart with large red blood cells flowing out. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 321,000 men died from heart disease in 2013, or one in every four male deaths. (NIH courtesy image)

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 321,000 men died from heart disease in 2013, or one in every four male deaths

Recommended Content:

Men's Health | Heart Health

Absolute and Relative Morbidity Burdens Attributable to Various Illnesses and Injuries, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016

Infographic
6/19/2017
Did you know  … ? In 2016, essential hypertension accounted for 52,586 encounters for health care among 29,612 active component service members in the U.S. Armed Forces. Of all cardiovascular diseases, essential hypertension is by far the most common specific condition diagnosed among active duty service members. Untreated hypertension increases the risks of subsequent ischemic heart disease (heart attack), cerebrovascular disease (stroke), and kidney failure. CHART: Healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2016 Major condition: •	For all other cardiovascular the number of medical encounters was 70,781, Rank 29, number of individuals affected was 35,794 with a rank of 30. The number of bed days was 4,285 with a rank of 21. •	For essential hypertension the number of medical encounters was 52,586, rank 35, number of individuals affected was 29,612 with a rank of 35. The number of bed days was 151 with a rank of 86. •	For cerebrovascular disease the number of medical encounters was 7,772, rank 79, number of individuals affected was 1,708, with a rank of 96. The number of bed days was 2,107 with a rank of 32. •	For ischemic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 6,629, rank 83, number of individuals affected 2,399 with a rank of 87. The number of bed days was 1,140 with a rank of 42. •	For inflammatory the number of medical encounters was 2,221, rank 106, number of individuals affected 1,302 with a rank of 97. The number of bed days was 297 with a rank of 72. •	For rheumatic heart disease the number of medical encounters was 319, rank 125, number of individuals affected 261, with a rank of 121. The number of bed days was 2 with a rank of 133. Learn more about healthcare burdens attributable to various diseases and injuries by visiting Health.mil/MSMRArchives. #LoveYourHeart Infogaphic graphic features transparent graphic of a man’s heart illuminated within his chest.

This infographic documents healthcare burdens attributable to cardiovascular diseases among active component, U.S. Armed Forces in 2016.

Recommended Content:

Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch | Preventive Health | Men's Health | Heart Health

Keesler Medical Center surgeons implant Air Force's first Micra Pacemaker

Article
4/21/2017
Air Force Lt. Col. (Dr.) Matthew Hann, 81st Medical Operations Squadron interventional cardiologist, inserts a Micra Transcatheter Pacing System at the Keesler Medical Center. Keesler is the first Air Force hospital to offer the world’s smallest pacemaker for patients with bradycardia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Kemberly Groue)

Pacemakers are the most common way to treat bradycardia and restore the heart's normal rhythm by sending electrical impulses to increase heart rate

Recommended Content:

Technology | Military Hospitals and Clinics

To salt or not to salt?

Article
4/20/2017
Most Americans get more than 75% of their sodium from prepared and processed foods, including tomato sauce, soups, gravies, canned foods, bread, frozen pizzas, snack foods, and salad dressings. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Jesus McCloud)

It’s important to watch your sodium intake because it can increase your risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke and some cancers

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Nutrition | American Medical Association Continuing Medical Education | Procurement

Walter Reed makes new leadless pacemaker available to military patients

Article
3/13/2017
Surgeons at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center implant the leadless pacemaker. (U.S. Army photo)

Doctors at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center are implementing the leadless pacemaker

Recommended Content:

Military Hospitals and Clinics | Innovation | Technology | Quality and Safety of Health Care (for Healthcare Professionals)

Healthy hearts, healthy lives: recognizing heart disease in women

Article
3/9/2017
The Military Health System is encouraging people to know their risk for heart disease and understand how they can help prevent it. (VA Caribbean Healthcare System photo by Joseph Rivera Rebolledo)

Heart disease in women can be harder to detect when the symptoms aren’t always the same, or as prominent, as they are in men

Recommended Content:

Heart Health | Women's Health

The ABC's of Heart Health

Infographic
2/22/2016
ABC's of Heart Health Infographic

Bring awareness to the risks of heart disease and ways to stay heart healthy.

Recommended Content:

Heart Health

Take Charge of Your Heart Health

Infographic
2/16/2016
Infographic for Heart Health Month about Regular Checkups

Take Charge of Your Heart Health with Regular Checkups

Recommended Content:

Heart Health

Keep Your Heart Healthy This Valentine's Day

Infographic
2/11/2016
Keep Your Heart Healthy this Valentine's Day

4 ways to keep your heart healthy this Valentine's Day

Recommended Content:

Heart Health
<< < 1 2 > >> 
Showing results 1 - 15 Page 1 of 2

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing: Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.