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Sexually transmitted infections and sexual behavior of deploying shipboard US military personnel: a cross-sectional analysis.

Study

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence and risk behavior may differ at different phases of deployment. We examined STI prevalence and sexual behavior in the predeployment time period (12 months prior) among recently deployed shipboard US Navy and Marine Corps military personnel. METHODS: Data were collected from 1938 male and 515 female service members through an anonymous, self-completed survey assessing sexual behaviours and STI acquisition characteristics in the past 12 months. Cross-sectional sex-stratified descriptive statistics are reported. RESULTS: Overall, 67% (n=1262/1896) reported last sex with a military beneficiary (spouse, n=931, non-spouse service member, n=331). Among those with a sexual partner outside their primary partnership, 24% (n=90/373) reported using a condom the last time they had sex and 30% (n=72/243) reported their outside partner was a service member. In total, 90% (n=210/233) reported acquiring their most recent STI in the USA (88%, n=126/143 among those reporting ≥1 deployments and an STI ≥1 year ago) and a significantly higher proportion (p<0.01) of women than men acquired the STI from their regular partner (54% vs 21%) and/or a service member (50% vs 26%). CONCLUSIONS: Findings suggest a complex sexual network among service members and military beneficiaries. Findings may extend to other mobile civilian and military populations. Data suggest most STI transmission within the shipboard community may occur in local versus foreign ports but analyses from later time points in deployment are needed. These data may inform more effective STI prevention interventions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Harbertson J, Scott PT, Moore J, Wolf M, Morris J, Thrasher S et.al., Sexually transmitted infections and sexual behaviour of deploying shipboard US military personnel: a cross-sectional analysis. Sex Transm Infect. 2015 Dec;91(8):581-8.

Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military Volume 1. Design of the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

Study

Abstract

In early 2014, the Department of Defense Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office asked the RAND National Defense Research Institute to conduct an independent assessment of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military — an assessment last conducted in 2012 by the department itself with its Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Personnel. This volume documents the methodology used in the resulting RAND Military Workplace Study, which invited close to 560,000 service members to participate in a survey fielded in August and September of 2014. It describes the survey methods, how the new questionnaire was designed, and how sampling, recruitment, and analytic weighting were pursued. It also includes the entire survey instrument.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: DoD agency, office, or organization other than the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Defense Health Agency
  • Sponsoring Office: National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federally Funded Research and Development Center
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2014
  • Citation: Rand Corporation, National Defense Research Institute

Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Service Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

Study

Abstract

In early 2014, the Department of Defense (DoD) Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) asked the RAND National Defense Research Institute (NDRI) to conduct an independent assessment of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military — an assessment last conducted in 2012 by the department itself with the Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Personnel (WGRA). This report provides initial top-line estimates from the resulting study, the RAND Military Workplace Study (RMWS), which included a survey of 560,000 U.S. service members fielded in August and September of 2014. Compared to the prior DoD studies, the RMWS takes a new approach to counting individuals in the military who experienced sexual assault, sexual harassment, or gender discrimination. Our measurement of sexual assault aligns closely with the definitions and criteria in the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) for Article 120 crimes. The survey measures of sexual harassment and gender discrimination, which together we refer to as sex-based military equal opportunity (MEO) violations, use criteria drawn directly from DoD Directive 1350.2. Compared with past surveys that were designed to measure a climate of sexual misconduct associated with illegal behavior, the approach used in the RMWS offers greater precision in estimating the number of crimes and MEO violations that have occurred. However, recognizing that DoD is also interested in trends in sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination, RAND fielded a portion of the 2014 surveys using the same questions as previous DoD surveys on this topic. Key Findings RAND Researchers Estimate That, as of Early Fall of 2014, Approximately 20,000 of the U.S. Military's 1.3 Million Active-Duty Members Experienced One or More Sexual Assaults in the Past Year This figure includes assaults by other service members, civilians, spouses or others. It represents 4.9 percent of active-duty women and 1 percent of active-duty men. An Estimated 26 Percent of Active-Duty Women and 7 Percent of Active-Duty Men Experienced Sexual Harassment or Gender Discrimination in the Past Year Close to one third of women in the Navy and Marines experienced one of these violations in the past year. The majority of these violations involve experiences consistent with a sexually hostile work environment; however, significant numbers of women also indicate having experienced gender discrimination. We estimate that in the Army, almost 1 in 12 men experienced such a violation in the past year; in the Navy, it was nearly 1 in 10. For men, the largest source of problems stem from sexually hostile work environments, not gender discrimination or sexual quid pro quo. The Study Found Significant Differences in Rates of Sexual Assaults and Sex-Based MEO Violations by Branch of Service Fewer Air Force men and women experienced these events than their counterparts in the other services. In forthcoming reports, RAND will investigate if some of these service differences are attributable to differences in member demographics (e.g., age and education levels), cultures, or policies across services. Trend Data Suggest That Rates of Unwanted Sexual Contact and Sexual Harassment for Active-Duty Women Have Declined from 2012; Rates for Both Men and Women Are Lower Than in 2006, But About the Same as in 2010 We estimate that the percentage of active-duty women who experienced unwanted sexual contact as measured by the WGRA methods declined from 6.1 percent in 2012 to 4.3 percent in 2014; the same percentages for men did not see a statistically significant change (1.2 percent in 2012 compared with 0.9 percent in 2014). Similarly, estimates for the percentage of women who experienced sexual harassment in the past year declined significantly from 23.2 percent in 2012 to 20.2 percent in 2014; for men, the percentage in 2014 (3.5 percent) was not significantly lower than in 2012 (4.1 percen

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: DoD agency, office, or organization other than the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Defense Health Agency
  • Sponsoring Office: National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federally Funded Research and Development Center
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2014
  • Citation: Rand Corporation, National Defense Research Institute

Sexual Assault and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military Top-Line Estimates for Active-Duty Coast Guard Members from the 2014 RAND Military Workplace Study

Study

Abstract

In early 2014, the Department of Defense (DoD) Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Office (SAPRO) asked the RAND National Defense Research Institute (NDRI) to conduct an independent assessment of sexual assault, sexual harassment, and gender discrimination in the military — an assessment last conducted in 2012 by the department itself with the Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Personnel (WGRA). Separately, the Coast Guard requested that we expand the 2014 study to include an assessment of its active and reserve force. This report provides initial top-line active-duty Coast Guard estimates from the resulting RAND Military Workplace Study, which invited close to 560,000 service members to participate in a survey fielded in August and September of 2014. The RMWS takes an approach to counting individuals in the military who experienced sexual assault, sexual harassment, or gender discrimination that measures the incidence of specific crimes and violations. Our measurement of sexual assault aligns closely with the definitions and criteria in the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) for Article 120 crimes. The survey measures of sexual harassment and gender discrimination, which together we refer to as sex-based military equal opportunity (MEO) violations, use criteria drawn from DoD Directive 1350.2. Compared with past surveys that were designed to measure a climate of sexual misconduct associated with illegal behavior, the approach used in the RMWS offers greater precision in estimating the number of crimes and MEO violations that have occurred. Key Findings RAND Researchers Estimate That, as of Early Fall of 2014, Approximately 270 of the U.S. Coast Guard's 39,000 Active-Duty Members Experienced One or More Sexual Assaults in the Past Year This figure includes assaults by other service members, civilians, spouses or others. It represents 3.0 percent of active-duty women and 0.3 percent of active-duty men. Nearly a Quarter of Active-Duty Women Experienced Sexual Harassment or Gender Discrimination in the Past Year The majority of these sex-based military equal opportunity (MEO) violations involve experiences consistent with a sexually hostile work environment or gender discrimination. Our estimate of the prevalence of sex-based MEO violations against active-duty Coast Guard men is substantially lower, though still affecting about 1 in 22 men. These violations usually involve hostile work environments. The Study Found That A Smaller Proportion of Coast Guard Members Experienced Sexual Assaults Than Found Among Their Counterparts in the Other U.S. Military Services In forthcoming reports, RAND will investigate if some of these service differences are attributable to differences in member demographics (e.g., age and education levels), cultures, or policies across services. Men in the Coast Guard experienced lower rates of sex-based MEO violations than men in the other services.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: DoD agency, office, or organization other than the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Defense Health Agency
  • Sponsoring Office: National Development and Research Institutes, Inc.
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Federally Funded Research and Development Center
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2014
  • Citation: Rand Corporation, National Defense Research Institute

Seroprevalence and seroincidence of herpes simplex virus (2006-2010), syphilis (2006-2010), and vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus subtypes (2000-2010) among US military personnel.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections have historically been burdensome in military populations. We describe the seroprevalence and seroincidence of vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus (VP-HPV) subtypes in a sample of 200 servicemen, along with the seroprevalence and seroincidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1/2) and syphilis in a sample of 200 men and 200 women. METHODS: Sera from 200 men, along with associated demographic data, were obtained and tested for HPV serotypes at service entry and 10 years later. Similarly, 200 active-duty men and 200 active-duty women were tested for HSV-1/2 at entry to service and 4 years later. RESULTS: The baseline prevalence of VP-HPV subtypes was 14.5%, and cumulative seroincidence of new infection was 34% over a 10-year period (n = 68). Of these, 63% (n = 43) represented HPV-6, HPV-11, or both; 18% of new infections were either HPV-16 or HPV-18, and 19% (n = 13) were a mixture of all 4 strains. At entry to military service, 33.5% of men were seropositive for HSV-1 and 1.5% were positive for HSV-2; seroincidence was 3.4 and 1.1 per 100 person-years, respectively. Among women, 39% were seropositive for HSV-1 and 4.0% for HSV-2; seroincidence was 5.5 and 3.3 per 100 person-years, respectively. There were 2 prevalent and 3 incident cases of syphilis. CONCLUSIONS: Sexually transmitted infections in military populations are highly prevalent, incident, and epidemiologically distinct. Our data show the rates of HPV and HSV-1/2 acquisition that are higher than those seen in the general public, again highlighting the need for continued preventive efforts. Consideration of universal HPV vaccination among men is warranted.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: May 01, 2015
  • Citation: Masel J, et. al., Seroprevalence and seroincidence of herpes simplex virus (2006-2010), syphilis (2006-2010), and vaccine-preventable human papillomavirus subtypes (2000-2010) among US military personnel. Sex Transm Dis. 2015 May;42(5):253-8

Self-reported sexually transmitted infections and sexual risk behaviors in the U.S. Military: how sex influences risk.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are prevalent in the U.S. military. However, there are limited data on risk-factor differences between sexes. METHODS: We used data from the 2008 Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors among active duty military personnel to identify risk factors for self-reported STIs within the past 12 months and multiple sexual partners among sexually active unmarried service members. RESULTS: There were 10,250 active duty personnel, mostly white (59.3%) aged 21 to 25 years (42.6%). The prevalence of any reported STI in the past 12 months was 4.2% for men and 6.9% for women. One-fourth of men and 9.3% of women reported 5 or more sexual partners in the past 12 months. Binge drinking, illicit substance use, and unwanted sexual contact were associated with increased report of sexual partners among both sexes. Family/personal-life stress and psychological distress influenced number of partnerships more strongly for women than for men (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR]=1.58, 95% Confidence Interval [CI]=1.18-2.12 and AOR=1.41, 95% CI=1.14-1.76, respectively). After adjusting for potential confounders, we found that the report of multiple sexual partners was significantly associated with the report of an STI among men (AOR, 5.87 [95% CI, 3.70-9.31], for ≥5 partners; AOR, 2.35 [95% CI, 1.59-3.49], for 2-4 partners) and women (AOR, 4.78 [95% CI, 2.12-10.80], for ≥5 partners; AOR, 2.35 [95% CI, 1.30-4.25], for 2-4 partners). CONCLUSIONS: Factors associated with the report of increasing sexual partnerships and report of an STI differed by sex. Sex-specific intervention strategies may be most effective in mitigating the factors that influence risky sexual behaviors among military personnel.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Undetermined
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Stahlman S, Javanbakht M, Cochran S, Hamilton AB, Shoptaw S, Gorbach PM. Self-reported sexually transmitted infections and sexual risk behaviors in the U.S. Military: how sex influences risk. Sex Transm Dis. 2014 Jun;41(6):359-64

Self-administration of intranasal influenza vaccine: Immunogenicity and volunteer acceptance. Vaccine. 2015 Jul 31;33(32):3894-9.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: In outbreak settings, mass vaccination strategies could maximize health protection of military personnel. Self-administration of live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) may be a means to vaccinate large numbers of people and achieve deployment readiness while sparing the use of human resources. METHODS: A phase IV, open-label, randomized controlled trial evaluating the immunogenicity and acceptance of self-administered (SA) LAIV was conducted from 2012 to 2014. SA subjects were randomized to either individual self-administration or self-administration in a group setting. Control randomized subjects received healthcare worker-administered (HCWA) LAIV. Anti-hemagglutinin (HAI) antibody concentrations were measured pre- and post-vaccination. The primary endpoint was immunogenicity non-inferiority between SA and HCWA groups. Subjects were surveyed on preferred administration method. RESULTS: A total of 1077 subjects consented and were randomized (529 SA, 548 HCWA). Subject characteristics were very similar between groups, though SA subjects were younger, more likely to be white and on active duty. The per-protocol analysis included 1024 subjects (501 SA, 523 HCWA). Post-vaccination geometric mean titers by vaccine strain and by study group (HCWA vs. SA) were: A/H1N1 (45.8 vs. 48.7, respectively; p=0.43), A/H3N2 (45.5 vs. 46.4; p=0.80), B/Yamagata (17.2 vs. 17.8; p=0.55). Seroresponses to A components were high (∼67%), while seroresponses to B components were lower (∼25%). Seroresponse did not differ by administration method. Baseline preference for administration method was similar between groups, with the majority in each group expressing no preference. At follow-up, the majority (64%) of SA subjects preferred SA vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: LAIV immunogenicity was similar for HCWA and SA vaccines. SA was well-tolerated and preferred to HCWA among those who performed SA.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2015
  • Citation: Burgess TH, et. al.,

Safety, Tolerability, and Compliance with Long-Term Antimalarial Chemoprophylaxis in American Soldiers in Afghanistan.

Study

Abstract

Long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis is currently used by deployed U.S. military personnel. Previous small, short-term efficacy studies have shown variable rates of side effects among patients taking various forms of chemoprophylaxis, though reliable safety and tolerability data on long-term use are limited. We conducted a survey of troops returning to Fort Drum, NY following a 12-month deployment to Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan from 2006 to 2007. Of the 2,351 respondents, 95% reported taking at least one form of prophylaxis during their deployment, and 90% were deployed for > 10 months. Compliance with daily doxycycline was poor (60%) compared with 80% with weekly mefloquine (MQ). Adverse events (AEs) were reported by approximately 30% with both MQ and doxycycline, with 10% discontinuing doxycycline compared with 4% of MQ users. Only 6% and 31% of soldiers reported use of bed nets and skin repellents, respectively. Compliance with long-term malaria prophylaxis was poor, and there were substantial tolerability issues based on these anonymous survey results, though fewer with MQ than doxycycline. Given few long-term antimalarial chemoprophylaxis options, there is an unmet medical need for new antimalarials safe for long-term use.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: September 01, 2015
  • Citation: Saunders DL, et. al.,

Risk factors for severe outcomes among members of the United States military hospitalized with pneumonia and influenza, 2000-2012.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The progression from hospitalization for a respiratory infection to requiring substantial supportive therapy is a key stage of the influenza severity pyramid. Respiratory infections are responsible for 300,000-400,000 medical encounters each year among US military personnel, some of which progress to severe acute respiratory infections. METHODS: We obtained data on 11,086 hospitalizations for pneumonia and influenza (P&I) among non-recruit US military service members during the period of 1 January 2000 through 31 December 2012. From these, we identified 512 P&I hospitalizations that progressed to severe episodes using standard case definitions. We evaluated the effect of demographic and occupational characteristics, co-morbid conditions, and history of influenza vaccination on the risk of a hospitalized P&I case becoming a severe case. We also evaluated the risk of a severe outcome and the length of time since influenza vaccination (within 180, 60, and 30 days). RESULTS: The median age of subjects at the time of the P&I episode was 32 years (range, 28-40) and subjects were predominantly male (89.5%). In a univariate analysis, demographic risk factors for a severe episode included service in the US Air Force (RR=1.6 relative to US Army, 95%CI 1.3-2.1), US Coast Guard (RR=2.1, 1.2-3.7) or US Navy (RR=1.4, 1.1-1.8). Being born in the US and recent influenza vaccination (within 180 days of episode) were protective against developing severe disease. Among co-morbid conditions, univariate risk factors for severe disease included chronic renal or liver disease (RR=4.98, 95%CI 4.1-6.1), diseases of the circulatory system (RR=3.1, 95%CI 2.6-3.7), diabetes mellitus (RR=2.3, 95%CI 1.5-3.6), obesity (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.2-2.1), cancer (RR=1.6, 95%CI 1.3-2.0), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (RR=1.4, 95%CI 1.1-1.7). Although many of the risk factors found to be significant in univariate analysis were no longer significant under a multivariate analysis, receipt of any influenza vaccine within 180 days of episode remained protective (RR=0.81, 95%CI 0.67-0.99), while serving in the US Coast Guard (RR=1.9, 95%CI 1.1-3.4) or US Air Force (RR=1. 5, 95%CI 1.2-2.0), presence of renal or liver disease (RR=3.6, 95%CI 2.9-4.6), and diseases of the circulatory system (RR=2.2, 95%CI 1.8-2.8), remained significantly associated with a higher risk of developing severe disease. CONCLUSIONS: In a large cohort, after adjusting for many possible risk factors, influenza vaccination was protective against severe episodes among P&I hospitalizations. The service-specific (US Coast Guard or US Air Force) increased risk may represent some differences in data (e.g., coding or reporting practices) as opposed to genuine differences in physiological outcome. Our findings suggest that renal and liver disease as well as diseases of the circulatory system may contribute to influenza severity in this population independently of age and other potential comorbidities. These findings provide additional evidence for the prioritization of specific risk groups within the US military for influenza vaccination.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Van Kerkhove MD, Cooper MJ, Cost AA, Sanchez JL, Riley S. Risk factors for severe outcomes among members of the United States military hospitalized with pneumonia and influenza, 2000-2012. Vaccine. 2015 Dec 8;33(49):6970-6.

Risk factors for colostomy in military colorectal trauma: a review of 867 patients.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Limited data exist examining the use of fecal diversion in combatants from modern armed conflicts. Characterization of factors leading to colostomy creation is an initial step toward optimizing and individualizing combat casualty care. METHODS: A retrospective review of the US Department of Defense Trauma Registry database was performed for all US and coalition troops with colorectal injuries sustained during combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan over 8 years. Colostomy rate, anatomic injury location, mechanism of injury, demographic data, and initial physiologic parameters were examined. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. RESULTS: We identified 867 coalition military personnel with colorectal injuries. The overall colostomy rate was 37%. Rectal injuries had the highest diversion rate (56%), followed by left-sided (41%) and right-sided (20%) locations (P < .0001). Those with gunshot wounds (GSW) underwent diversion more often than blast injuries (43% vs 31% respectively, P < .0008). Injury Severity Score ≥16 (41% vs 30%; P = .0018) and damage control surgery (DCS; 48.2% vs 31.4%; P < .0001) were associated with higher diversion rates. On multivariate analysis, significant predictors for colostomy creation were injury location: Rectal versus left colon (odds ratio [OR], 2.2), rectal versus right colon (OR, 7.5), left versus right colon (OR, 3.4), GSW (OR, 2.0), ISS ≥ 16 (OR, 1.7), and DCS (OR, 1.6). CONCLUSION: In this exploratory study of 320 combat-related colostomies, distal colon and rectal injuries continue to be diverted at higher rates independent of other comorbidities. Additional outcomes-directed research is needed to determine whether such operative management is beneficial in all patients

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Army
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2014
  • Citation: Watson JD, Aden JK, Engel JE, Rasmussen TE, Glasgow SC. Risk factors for colostomy in military colorectal trauma: a review of 867 patients. Surgery. 2014 Jun;155(6):1052-61.

Risk factors associated with suicide in current and former US military personnel.

Study

Abstract

IMPORTANCE: Beginning in 2005, the incidence of suicide deaths in the US military began to sharply increase. Unique stressors, such as combat deployments, have been assumed to underlie the increasing incidence. Previous military suicide studies, however, have relied on case series and cross-sectional investigations and have not linked data during service with postservice periods. OBJECTIVE: To prospectively identify and quantify risk factors associated with suicide in current and former US military personnel including demographic, military, mental health, behavioral, and deployment characteristics. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Prospective longitudinal study with accrual and assessment of participants in 2001, 2004, and 2007. Questionnaire data were linked with the National Death Index and the Department of Defense Medical Mortality Registry through December 31, 2008. Participants were current and former US military personnel from all service branches, including active and Reserve/National Guard, who were included in the Millennium Cohort Study (N = 151,560). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Death by suicide captured by the National Death Index and the Department of Defense Medical Mortality Registry. RESULTS: Through the end of 2008, findings were 83 suicides in 707,493 person-years of follow-up (11.73/100,000 person-years [95% CI, 9.21-14.26]). In Cox models adjusted for age and sex, factors significantly associated with increased risk of suicide included male sex, depression, manic-depressive disorder, heavy or binge drinking, and alcohol-related problems. None of the deployment-related factors (combat experience, cumulative days deployed, or number of deployments) were associated with increased suicide risk in any of the models. In multivariable Cox models, individuals with increased risk for suicide were men (hazard ratio [HR], 2.14; 95% CI, 1.17-3.92; P = .01; attributable risk [AR], 3.5 cases/10,000 persons), and those with depression (HR, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.05-3.64; P = .03; AR, 6.9/10,000 persons), manic-depressive disorder (HR, 4.35; 95% CI, 1.56-12.09; P = .005; AR, 35.6/10,000 persons), or alcohol-related problems (HR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.56-4.18; P <.001; AR, 7.7/10,000 persons). A nested, matched case-control analysis using 20:1 control participants per case confirmed these findings. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this sample of current and former military personnel observed July 1, 2001-December 31, 2008, suicide risk was independently associated with male sex and mental disorders but not with military-specific variables. These findings may inform approaches to mitigating suicide risk in this population.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: DoD agency, office, or organization other than the Army, Navy, Air Force, or Defense Health Agency
  • Sponsoring Office:
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Agency, office or organization under authority of the Sec Def (not affiliated to Army, Navy, or Air Force)
  • Release Date/Publication: August 01, 2013
  • Citation: LeardMann CA, Powell TM, Smith TC, Bell MR, Smith B, Boyko EJ, Hooper TI, Gackstetter GD, Ghamsary M, Hoge CW. Risk factors associated with suicide in current and former US military personnel. JAMA. 2013 Aug 7;310(5):496-506

Retrospective Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes After Combat Injury: A Hidden Cost of War.

Study

Abstract

BACKGROUND: During the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, 52 087 service members have been wounded in combat. The long-term sequelae of these injuries have not been carefully examined. We sought to determine the relation between markers of injury severity and the subsequent development of hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: Retrospective cohort study of critically injured US military personnel wounded in Iraq or Afghanistan from February 1, 2002 to February 1, 2011. Patients were then followed until January 18, 2013. Chronic disease outcomes were assessed by International Classification of Diseases, 9th edition codes and causes of death were confirmed by autopsy. From 6011 admissions, records were excluded because of missing data or if they were for an individual's second admission. Patients with a disease diagnosis of interest before the injury date were also excluded, yielding a cohort of 3846 subjects for analysis. After adjustment for other factors, each 5-point increment in the injury severity score was associated with a 6%, 13%, 13%, and 15% increase in incidence rates of hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease, respectively. Acute kidney injury was associated with a 66% increase in rates of hypertension and nearly 5-fold increase in rates of chronic kidney disease. CONCLUSIONS: In Iraq and Afghanistan veterans, the severity of combat injury was associated with the subsequent development of hypertension, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: December 01, 2015
  • Citation: Stewart IJ, Sosnov JA, Howard JT, Orman JA, Fang R, Morrow BD, Zonies DH, Bollinger M, Tuman C, Freedman BA, Chung KK. Retrospective Analysis of Long-Term Outcomes After Combat Injury: A Hidden Cost of War. Circulation. 2015 Dec 1;132(22):2126-33.

Results of a pilot screening programme for genital and extragenital gonococcal and chlamydial infections in a military population following the repeal of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'.

Study

Abstract

No abstract available

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: June 01, 2015
  • Citation: Lee T, Ganesan A. Results of a pilot screening programme for genital and extragenital gonococcal and chlamydial infections in a military population following the repeal of 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell'. Sex Transm Infect. 2015 Jun;91(4):233.

Reproductive Health of Active Duty Women in Medically Austere Environments

Study

Abstract

One in seven of the approximately 2.2 million Department of Defense active duty military personnel are women. Among active duty servicewomen, about 40% are under 26 years old, and almost half are young, lower ranking enlisted personnel. This article will include a review of the literature on military women's health topics such including contraception access, pregnancy, and pregnancy outcomes after environmental exposures. In these early adult years, contraception use may not be consistent, leading to higher rates of unintended pregnancy that is similar to their civilian counterparts, but it may affect troop readiness. Women who become pregnant after deployment must be evacuated from theater. Complications in pregnancy that require immediate intervention, such as ectopic pregnancy, may be more difficult to diagnose and manage if far away from comprehensive medical services. Environmental exposures may affect the pregnancy outcome, or may produce delayed responses for future childbearing. Women face other gynecologic choices including menstrual suppression while deployed. Many of these issues have not been fully studied, sample sizes are small or methodological flaws exist in the analysis limiting conclusions that can be drawn. Further research with greater rigor, larger sample sizes, and careful design are needed to address many of these questions.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Release Date/Publication: January 01, 2016
  • Citation: Krulewitch CJ. Reproductive Health of Active Duty Women in Medically Austere Environments. Mil Med. 2016 Jan;181(1 Suppl):63-9.

Respiratory Infections in the U.S. Military: Recent Experience and Control.

Study

Abstract

This comprehensive review outlines the impact of military-relevant respiratory infections, with special attention to recruit training environments, influenza pandemics in 1918 to 1919 and 2009 to 2010, and peacetime operations and conflicts in the past 25 years. Outbreaks and epidemiologic investigations of viral and bacterial infections among high-risk groups are presented, including (i) experience by recruits at training centers, (ii) impact on advanced trainees in special settings, (iii) morbidity sustained by shipboard personnel at sea, and (iv) experience of deployed personnel. Utilizing a pathogen-by-pathogen approach, we examine (i) epidemiology, (ii) impact in terms of morbidity and operational readiness, (iii) clinical presentation and outbreak potential, (iv) diagnostic modalities, (v) treatment approaches, and (vi) vaccine and other control measures. We also outline military-specific initiatives in (i) surveillance, (ii) vaccine development and policy, (iii) novel influenza and coronavirus diagnostic test development and surveillance methods, (iv) influenza virus transmission and severity prediction modeling efforts, and (v) evaluation and implementation of nonvaccine, nonpharmacologic interventions.

  • Publication Status: Published
  • Sponsoring Organization: Defense Health Agency (formerly TRICARE Management Activity)
  • Sponsoring Office: Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center
  • Congressionally Mandated: No
  • Funding Source: Undetermined
  • Release Date/Publication: July 01, 2015
  • Citation: Sanchez JL, Cooper MJ, Myers CA, Cummings JF, Vest KG, Russell KL, Sanchez JL, Hiser MJ, Gaydos CA. Respiratory Infections in the U.S. Military: Recent Experience and Control. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2015 Jul;28(3):743-800.
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