Back to Top Skip to main content Skip to sub-navigation

Six Immediate Health Benefits You Will See If You Lose a Little Weight

Image of A soldier assigned to the 256th Combat Support Hospital, Twinsburg, Ohio, drinks water from a gallon-sized jug during Combat Support Training Exercise 18-03 at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, March 26, 2018. The 256th CSH implemented a goal setting competition, dubbed Dandy Camp, to teach and encourage soldiers to monitor their total carbohydrate intake during the field exercise. The overall goal of Dandy Camp is to educate soldiers about healthy eating choices and encourage soldiers to set and meet goals for themselves. . A soldier assigned to the 256th Combat Support Hospital, Twinsburg, Ohio, drinks water from a gallon-sized jug during Combat Support Training Exercise 18-03 at Fort McCoy, Wisconsin, March 26, 2018. The 256th CSH implemented a goal setting competition, dubbed Dandy Camp, to teach and encourage soldiers to monitor their total carbohydrate intake during the field exercise. The overall goal of Dandy Camp is to educate soldiers about healthy eating choices and encourage soldiers to set and meet goals for themselves. Photo by Army Sgt. First Class Debra Richardson

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Women's Health | Heart Health | Nutritional Fitness | Psychological Fitness | Sleep

Did you know that dropping just 10 pounds of body weight takes 40 pounds of pressure off your knees? That's equivalent to not carrying around a cinder block.

Losing even a little weight now can have a major impact on your health and quality of life. This long list of benefits might help motivate you to adjust your habits to achieve a happier, healthier lifestyle.

Reduce Blood Pressure

Eating more nutritious foods and drinking more water can reduce high blood pressure, and its risk of stroke and heart attack. Nearly half of service members diagnosed as overweight or obese are also diagnosed with hypertension, Defense Health Agency data shows.

Reduce Joint and Back Pain

Carrying less body weight will reduce stress on your entire body. DHA data shows that one in five overweight service members reports lower back pain.

Women's Health

Obesity can also have significant consequences for women's reproductive systems, including menstrual disorders, infertility, miscarriage, and poor pregnancy outcomes. If you plan to get pregnant, now's the time to shed some weight.

Better Sleep

The more weight you lose, the less likely you are to snore or have sleep apnea, where your breathing actually stops for short periods of time throughout the night. You might even get to stop using your C-PAP device.

DHA data finds that 1 in 4 service members who are overweight share a diagnosis of sleep disorder like apnea and snoring.

The result of better sleep? You're less fatigued, have more energy, and a happier bedroom partner.

Reduced Risk of Diabetes

Another bonus of losing weight? Your chances of developing prediabetes or full-blown type 2 diabetes drop significantly as your blood sugars drop.

Mood improvements

As you take more control of your weight, you may see a decrease in symptoms of depression and an improvement in self-image.

Finally, you likely will reduce the anxiety that hovers over you knowing that you're going to have to pass that fitness test.

How to Start

So get started. Talk to a nutritionist, dietitian, or physical trainer about getting your weight loss plan in place. In the long run, finding and sustaining a healthy weight lowers your risk of serious chronic diseases. Now's the best time to start.

Pro Tip 1: Drink More Water

What should be your first step and how quickly can that help you? The answer is as simple as drinking more water.

Drinking water throughout the day fills you up, lubricates your joints, improves your skin, eliminates toxins faster, and helps with digestion. No more acid reflux, also known as GERD, or eating handfuls of antacids like candy!

Start carrying water with you at all times and sip it until you need a refill. Then do it all again.

Making this one change can help with joint pain which comes with being overweight, as well as reducing arthritis symptoms.

Pro Tip 2: Start Small

The best advice from nutritionists is to start small and then make more changes as your health improves.

Start with a specific, measurable goal that is achievable within a short period of time. That will make it relevant to you.

For example, try to lose 5% of your body weight, dropping 1 or 2 pounds a week. For a 230-pound man, that's about 11-1/2 pounds.

You also may be interested in...

Why Simone Biles’ Mental Health Struggle Matters for Military Troops

Article
8/3/2021
Gymnasts posing for a picture

The Simone Biles story at the Olympics is a teachable moment for service members and their mental wellbeing, commanders say.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Fitness | Total Body Preventive Health - Dental, Medical & Mental

DHA releases App to Support Service Member Recovery

Article
7/26/2021
Infographic for the Antidepressant Adherence app

To ensure that military beneficiaries receive the support they need to continue on their mental wellness journey, the Antidepressant Adherence app supports those taking medication

Recommended Content:

Psychological Fitness | Depression | Health Care Technology

Ask the Doc: AO2 Energy

Article
7/26/2021
AO2

Dear Doc: Me and the guys in my shop drink A LOT of caffeine. I'm not much of a coffee guy, but I do drink two or three energy drinks a day. I drink a lot of water too, and I'm young and in good shape, but sometimes I feel like I'm a little too reliant on these drinks. I sometimes short myself on sleep only because I know I can have an energy drink or two and be fine for most of the day. Is that a problem? Should I cut back? What are the impacts on my health? Are some forms of caffeine (coffee or tea, for example) better or safer than others? I'd rather focus on this while I'm young and healthy instead of keeping it up for a decade before I realize it's caused a real health problem. -AO2 Energy

Recommended Content:

Nutritional Fitness | Ask The Doc

AJ-Maste Yoga: Tips for a Healthy Deployment

Article
7/13/2021
Military personnel doing a yoga pose

Yoga comes in many forms and fashions, and has proven health benefits.

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Total Force Fitness

Aphasia, Caused by Stroke or TBI, is Frustrating and Little Known

Article
6/29/2021
A doctor looking at brain scans

Aphasia is an incurable disease usually caused by stroke that affects all forms of communication.

Recommended Content:

Total Force Fitness | Heart Health | Centers of Excellence | Traumatic Brain Injury

PTSD: Seeking out mental health care is the first step to wellness

Article
6/28/2021
A picture of hands folded together

PTSD: What it is and treatments that can help

Recommended Content:

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder | Psychological Fitness | Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Clinical Social Worker Provides Mental-Health Support on Remote Base

Article
6/25/2021
Military personnel posing for a picture

Social worker on loan to NAWS China Lake provides mental health care to benefit the whole person.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Fitness | Mental Health: Seeking Care with TRICARE

Men’s health focus on the mental, physical & emotional health aspects

Article
6/8/2021
Military personnel during physical training

Screenings and regular check-ups help keep you mission ready.

Recommended Content:

Men's Health | Men's Health | Psychological Fitness

Mental Health Panel Discusses Impact of COVID-19

Article
6/3/2021
Military personnel wearing face mask speaking on a panel

Walter Reed Bethesda hosts mental health panel to discuss the impacts of COVID-19.

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus and the COVID-19 Vaccine | Coronavirus & the MHS Response | | Psychological Fitness

Ask the Doc: Fitness Freaking Out

Article
5/26/2021
Integrating healthy snacks like fruit into kid’s diets will teach them healthy eating habits. September is National Childhood Obesity Awareness month. (U.S. Air Force photo by Sabrina Fine)

Dear Doc: It seems like every time I go to the commissary, my daughter, 6, and son, 7, tend to gravitate toward the sugary cereals and frozen pizzas, and always want candy bars and sodas at the checkout. As far as I know, and as has been proven by their regularly scheduled check-ups, they are both in great health. The mother in me wants to give them what they want, but the former college athlete and current fitness freak in me is afraid that this might become a problem. For me, eating healthy has become a normal part of my life, and I've come to enjoy things that are healthy and taste good. Aside from tricking them, what can I do to get my kids to eat (and enjoy) more healthy foods? — Fitness Freaking Out

Recommended Content:

Physical Fitness | Nutritional Fitness | Ask The Doc

DOD/VA Collaborated to Combat Mental Health Challenges Women Face

Article
5/25/2021
Military personnel putting on a gas mask

In an area dominated by men, the military can still be a harsh environment for women, commanders say.

Recommended Content:

Mental Health: Seeking Care with TRICARE | Women's Health

Run Toward the Fire: My journey through mental illness

Article
5/21/2021
Military personnel posing with their children

Air Force Lt. Col. details her struggle with depression, anxiety and suicide ideation

Recommended Content:

Women's Health

METC trains BHT students in full range of mental health support

Article
5/14/2021
Two servicemembers talking at a table

Military mental health professionals provide a critical role in behavioral health care for service members and beneficiaries.

Recommended Content:

Psychological Fitness | Mental Health: Seeking Care with TRICARE | Education & Training | Medical Education and Training Campus

Service women: Plan for your future health care now

Article
5/13/2021
Graphic that has images of different women with the words "women's health transition training"

The online, self-paced Women’s Health Transition Training makes everything you need to know about VA women’s health services available anytime, anyplace.

Recommended Content:

Women's Health

Support for victims of sexual violence, trauma continues year round

Article
5/13/2021
Military personnel for a teal ribbon on a flight deck

Resources and support for survivors of sexual assault and military trauma.

Recommended Content:

Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention | Sexual Assault Awareness and Prevention | Sexual Trauma | Women's Health
<< < 1 2 3 4 5  ... > >> 
Showing results 61 - 75 Page 5 of 9
Refine your search
Last Updated: February 24, 2022

DHA Address: 7700 Arlington Boulevard | Suite 5101 | Falls Church, VA | 22042-5101

Some documents are presented in Portable Document Format (PDF). A PDF reader is required for viewing. Download a PDF Reader or learn more about PDFs.