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Military Health System

Articles

The Military Health System (MHS) is an interconnected network of Service Members whose mission is to support the lives and families of those who support our country. Everyday in the MHS advancements are made in the lab, in the field, and here at home. These are just a few articles highlighting those accomplishments that don't always make it to the front page of local papers.

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Adrenal Gland Disorders, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2002–2017

Article
12/1/2018

During 2002–2017, the most common incident adrenal gland disorder among male and female service members was adrenal insufficiency and the least common was adrenomedullary hyperfunction. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed among 267 females (crude overall incidence rate: 8.2 cases per 100,000 person-years [p-yrs]) and 729 males (3.9 per 100,000 p-yrs). In both sexes, overall rates of other disorders of adrenal gland and Cushing’s syndrome were lower than for adrenal insufficiency but higher than for hyperaldosteronism, adrenogenital disorders, and adrenomedullary hyperfunction. Crude overall rates of adrenal gland disorders among females tended to be higher than those of males, with female:male rate ratios ranging from 2.1 for adrenal insufficiency to 5.5 for androgenital disorders and Cushing’s syndrome. The highest overall rates of adrenal insufficiency for males and females were among non-Hispanic white service members. Among females, rates of Cushing's syndrome and other disorders of adrenal gland were 31.6 per 100,000 active component service members in 2017. Validation of ICD-9/ICD-10 diagnostic codes for MetS using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria is needed to establish the level of agreement between the two methods for identifying this condition.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Increased Number of Possible Rabies Exposures Among U.S. Health Care Beneficiaries Treated in Military Clinics in Southern Germany in 2016

Article
11/19/2018

In 2016, the U.S. Army Medical Department Activity-Bavaria recorded 108 possible rabies exposures, a 112% increase from the previous year. Of these, 49 (45%) occurred during prior deployments to Egypt and Eastern Europe in which they had not received timely rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

Cluster of Vivax Malaria in U.S. Soldiers Training Near the Demilitarized Zone, Republic of Korea During 2015

Article
11/19/2018

This report describes a cluster of 11 soldiers with vivax malaria among U.S. military personnel who trained at Dagmar North training area, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2015. Two cases were diagnosed in the ROK in 2015, one of whom subsequently experienced a relapse, and nine other cases were diagnosed in 2016, 8–11 months after the soldiers had returned to the U.S. Vivax malaria poses a health threat to U.S. Forces Korea operating near the DMZ in the ROK. Continuing and enhanced focus on force health protection measures in endemic zones is warranted.

Update: Cold Weather Injuries, Active and Reserve Components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2013–June 2018

Article
11/19/2018

This report describes a cluster of 11 soldiers with vivax malaria among U.S. military personnel who trained at Dagmar North training area, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2015. Two cases were diagnosed in the ROK in 2015, one of whom subsequently experienced a relapse, and nine other cases were diagnosed in 2016, 8–11 months after the soldiers had returned to the U.S. Vivax malaria poses a health threat to U.S. Forces Korea operating near the DMZ in the ROK. Continuing and enhanced focus on force health protection measures in endemic zones is warranted.

Malaria in the Korean Peninsula: Risk Factors, Latent Infections, and the Possible Role of Tafenoquine, a New Antimalarial Weapon

Article
11/19/2018

For decades, malaria infections acquired in Korea have posed a significant threat to both Korean military and civilians and to U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) personnel. In Korea, malaria infections are caused exclusively by the species Plasmodium vivax (PV). Despite the use of chloroquine chemoprophylaxis during the Korean War (1950–1953), thousands of cases of PV malaria were diagnosed in Korea among U.S. military personnel.1 As troops returned home, however, many more cases were diagnosed stateside, inundating military hospitals and leading to research on the use of primaquine to treat what were termed “late attacks of Plasmodium vivax of Korean origin”.

Cluster of Vivax Malaria in U.S. Soldiers Training Near the Demilitarized Zone, Republic of Korea During 2015

Article
11/19/2018

This report describes a cluster of 11 soldiers with vivax malaria among U.S. military personnel who trained at Dagmar North training area, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2015. Two cases were diagnosed in the ROK in 2015, one of whom subsequently experienced a relapse, and nine other cases were diagnosed in 2016, 8–11 months after the soldiers had returned to the U.S. Vivax malaria poses a health threat to U.S. Forces Korea operating near the DMZ in the ROK. Continuing and enhanced focus on force health protection measures in endemic zones is warranted.

Adrenal Gland Disorders, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2002–2017

Article
12/1/2018

During 2002–2017, the most common incident adrenal gland disorder among male and female service members was adrenal insufficiency and the least common was adrenomedullary hyperfunction. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed among 267 females (crude overall incidence rate: 8.2 cases per 100,000 person-years [p-yrs]) and 729 males (3.9 per 100,000 p-yrs). In both sexes, overall rates of other disorders of adrenal gland and Cushing’s syndrome were lower than for adrenal insufficiency but higher than for hyperaldosteronism, adrenogenital disorders, and adrenomedullary hyperfunction. Crude overall rates of adrenal gland disorders among females tended to be higher than those of males, with female:male rate ratios ranging from 2.1 for adrenal insufficiency to 5.5 for androgenital disorders and Cushing’s syndrome. The highest overall rates of adrenal insufficiency for males and females were among non-Hispanic white service members. Among females, rates of Cushing's syndrome and other disorders of adrenal gland were 31.6 per 100,000 active component service members in 2017. Validation of ICD-9/ICD-10 diagnostic codes for MetS using the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III criteria is needed to establish the level of agreement between the two methods for identifying this condition.

Recommended Content:

Medical Surveillance Monthly Report

Increased Number of Possible Rabies Exposures Among U.S. Health Care Beneficiaries Treated in Military Clinics in Southern Germany in 2016

Article
11/19/2018

In 2016, the U.S. Army Medical Department Activity-Bavaria recorded 108 possible rabies exposures, a 112% increase from the previous year. Of these, 49 (45%) occurred during prior deployments to Egypt and Eastern Europe in which they had not received timely rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

Cluster of Vivax Malaria in U.S. Soldiers Training Near the Demilitarized Zone, Republic of Korea During 2015

Article
11/19/2018

This report describes a cluster of 11 soldiers with vivax malaria among U.S. military personnel who trained at Dagmar North training area, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2015. Two cases were diagnosed in the ROK in 2015, one of whom subsequently experienced a relapse, and nine other cases were diagnosed in 2016, 8–11 months after the soldiers had returned to the U.S. Vivax malaria poses a health threat to U.S. Forces Korea operating near the DMZ in the ROK. Continuing and enhanced focus on force health protection measures in endemic zones is warranted.

Update: Cold Weather Injuries, Active and Reserve Components, U.S. Armed Forces, July 2013–June 2018

Article
11/19/2018

This report describes a cluster of 11 soldiers with vivax malaria among U.S. military personnel who trained at Dagmar North training area, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2015. Two cases were diagnosed in the ROK in 2015, one of whom subsequently experienced a relapse, and nine other cases were diagnosed in 2016, 8–11 months after the soldiers had returned to the U.S. Vivax malaria poses a health threat to U.S. Forces Korea operating near the DMZ in the ROK. Continuing and enhanced focus on force health protection measures in endemic zones is warranted.

Malaria in the Korean Peninsula: Risk Factors, Latent Infections, and the Possible Role of Tafenoquine, a New Antimalarial Weapon

Article
11/19/2018

For decades, malaria infections acquired in Korea have posed a significant threat to both Korean military and civilians and to U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) personnel. In Korea, malaria infections are caused exclusively by the species Plasmodium vivax (PV). Despite the use of chloroquine chemoprophylaxis during the Korean War (1950–1953), thousands of cases of PV malaria were diagnosed in Korea among U.S. military personnel.1 As troops returned home, however, many more cases were diagnosed stateside, inundating military hospitals and leading to research on the use of primaquine to treat what were termed “late attacks of Plasmodium vivax of Korean origin”.

Cluster of Vivax Malaria in U.S. Soldiers Training Near the Demilitarized Zone, Republic of Korea During 2015

Article
11/19/2018

This report describes a cluster of 11 soldiers with vivax malaria among U.S. military personnel who trained at Dagmar North training area, near the demilitarized zone (DMZ), in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 2015. Two cases were diagnosed in the ROK in 2015, one of whom subsequently experienced a relapse, and nine other cases were diagnosed in 2016, 8–11 months after the soldiers had returned to the U.S. Vivax malaria poses a health threat to U.S. Forces Korea operating near the DMZ in the ROK. Continuing and enhanced focus on force health protection measures in endemic zones is warranted.

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Last Updated: June 15, 2021
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