Skip to main content

Military Health System

DHA proves power of collaboration in medical IT war games

Image of Men and women in room sitting in front of their laptops. The NATO Joint Force Training Centre in Bydgoszcz, Poland, hosted the 2019 Coalition Warrior Interoperability Exercise. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, CWIX 2020 was held virtually in secure locations worldwide. (NATO courtesy photo)

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus & the MHS Response | Health Care Technology

The Defense Health Agency was a lead player in medical information technology scenarios during the 2020 Coalition Warrior Interoperability Exercise. CWIX involved 22 NATO nations and partners participating in scenarios to identify, test, and resolve technical issues to ensure future success of NATO missions.

Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, this year's event was held virtually for two and half weeks at secure locations in more than 60 countries.

“Federated interoperability continues to be a priority for NATO and allied nations," said Mark Goodge, co-chair of the NATO Health Information Systems & Technology Working Group. " Leveraging technology is more important than ever for improved patient care, operational efficiencies, and decision-making," he added.

Three medical IT scenarios took place with the United States, the Netherlands, Belgium, and the NATO Communications and Information Agency participating. One scenario involved quickly and securely transmitting patient health information, medical records, and treatment provided to wounded service members from point of injury to all levels of care, including back to the home nation.

Another scenario tested functionality to evacuate sick, ill, and injured service members to military medical treatment facilities with available beds during a mass casualty situation.

A third scenario involved providing infectious disease reports to monitor disease spread and severity. "Information like isolate patients, do not send more patients to that area – this is the kind of command and control that information planners need to have, providers need to have, when you're talking about movement of patients and various roles in areas of operation," Goodge said.

The scenarios were run using OpenAHLTA, an open-source electronic health record (EHR) donated by the DHA. "It's served us very well over the last couple of decades," Goodge said, noting that OpenAHLTA is free, performs in environments with low or no communications, and uses the latest standard medical language terminology.

The EHR is a force multiplier to enhance medical readiness, response, and interoperability, said Goodge, noting that some countries still rely on paper medical records. Paper records are a risk to security and continuity of care. Paper records can result in the loss of vital medical information and the potential for medical errors, he noted.

The CWIX scenarios "proved to be a major evolutionary leap in a very quick fashion for the adoption of a platform that exists and has served the United States very well in our roles in theater combat support and operations for health care," Goodge said. "We were able to transmit real-time information. You simply can't move paper this fast and get this much situational awareness without an electronic medium."

Goodge said the successful scenarios demonstrated the power of collaboration among NATO and partner nations, commitment to innovation and continuous improvement for the well-being of service members, and the importance of using international health informatics standards.

The CWIX scenarios were videotaped and can be viewed on YouTube.

You also may be interested in...

Guam Plasma Collection

Photo
7/2/2020
Guam Plasma Collection

U.S. Naval Hospital Guam Hospitalman Apprentice Rebekah Morrison records the weight of convalescent plasma units collected from Sailors who recovered from COVID-19. (U.S. Navy Photo by Jaciyn Matanane/Released)

Recommended Content:

Coronavirus & the MHS Response

Desktop to Datacenter initiative explained at DHITS 2018

Photo
7/26/2018
Desktop to Datacenter initiative explained at DHITS 2018

Mark Goodge, chief technology officer for the Defense Health Agency, speaks to attendees of the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium about the agency Desktop to Datacenter initiative.

Recommended Content:

Defense Health Agency | Program Executive Office, Defense Healthcare Management Systems | Health Care Technology | Electronic Health Record: MHS GENESIS | Defense Health Information Technology Symposium

MHS Health IT Awards

Photo
7/24/2018
MHS Health IT Awards

On July 24, 2018, at the Defense Health Information Technology Symposium in Orlando, Fla., Service members and employees from across the Military Health System were recognized who have made significant contributions and demonstrated outstanding excellence and achievement in Health Information Technology (HIT) in the past year.

Recommended Content:

Health Care Technology | Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs | Defense Health Agency

No Patient Left Behind

Photo
7/26/2017
No Patient Left Behind

Army Col. Rich Wilson (left) moderates a panel discussion with current and former program managers from the Defense Health Agency's Solution Delivery Division. The panel, titled No Patient Left Behind: Leveraging Partnerships for Change, discussed the importance of supporting patient care during modernization as the MHS transitions legacy applications to new systems. Focusing on enterprise planning, patient risk mitigation, and the balance of investment, the panel discussed the importance of positive government and vendor relationships and ways to apply past experiences to build strategies for success in the future.

Recommended Content:

Health Care Technology | Defense Health Information Technology Symposium
Showing results 1 - 4 Page 1 of 1
Refine your search
Last Updated: August 15, 2022
Follow us on Instagram Follow us on LinkedIn Follow us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter Follow us on YouTube Sign up on GovDelivery