Skip main navigation

Military Health System

Clear Your Browser Cache

This website has recently undergone changes. Users finding unexpected concerns may care to clear their browser's cache to ensure a seamless experience.

TRICARE has Resources for Those Struggling with Events in Afghanistan

Image of A soldier looks out over a valley in the Kunar Province of Afghanistan while on patrol. . A soldier with the Army’s 10th Mountain Division looks out over a valley in the Kunar Province of Afghanistan while on patrol. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Matthew Moeller)

The news out of Afghanistan has affected many in our community. We know this may cause stress to some service members, military retirees, and their families. If you think you or a family member could benefit from mental health services, you’re covered with TRICARE.

“Departure of U.S. forces from Afghanistan stirred emotions from many people, particularly those who served in Afghanistan, their families, and their coworkers,” said Army Lt. Gen. (Dr.) Ronald J. Place, director of the Defense Health Agency. “Helplessness, anger, and frustration are all normal feelings, but know that you are not alone. Lean on each other, friends, family, chaplains, and others to talk it through. And know that the Military Health System is here for you if you need assistance.”

It’s important to note that there are resources that the Military Health System offers that you and your family can turn to.

If you want to speak with a TRICARE-authorized provider, you can reach out to your primary care manager or primary care provider. They can provide an initial assessment and possibly treatment. And they can refer you to an appropriate mental health care provider, if necessary.

You can also visit a mental health care provider. If you need help finding a network provider that’s right for you, call your TRICARE contractor. Keep in mind, some providers may offer telehealth options, which will allow you to use your phone, tablet, or computer to talk to a health care provider.

Remember, how you get non-emergency mental health care depends on the level of care you need, your health plan, and your sponsor status.

If you or a loved one needs immediate help, you are not alone. You can call the Veterans & Military Crisis Line by dialing 988 and selecting Option 1, or chat online. The crisis line is available to you 24/7.

The Psychological Health Resource Center is another 24/7 resource if you want help getting information or resources in your area. Call 1-866-966-1020. If you prefer to chat online with someone who can help you, you can also start a live chat.

The Military Health System has additional mental health resources that you can use. Find one that works for you.

If you think you have a medical health emergency, call 911 or your local emergency number right away. You can also go to the nearest emergency room. You don’t need a referral or pre-authorization for emergency care.

Learn more about covered mental health services. You can also download the TRICARE Mental Health and Substance Use Disorder Services Fact Sheet for more on your options for getting help.

You also may be interested in...

Video
Aug 23, 2023

Will Mental Health Services Affect My Security Clearance?

Image asks the question, Will mental health services affect my security clearance?

Dr. Joshua Morganstein addresses a very common question: Will seeking mental or behavioral health services affect my security clearance? The short answer is: No. A study from 2012 - 2018 looked at 2.3 million security clearances. Of those 2.3 million clearances, almost 47,000 people reported psychological health issues. Of those 47,000 people, ...

Video
Aug 23, 2023

3 Tips for Coming Home from Deployment

Image states three tips for coming home from deployment.

Coming home from deployment can be challenging. We might feel a sense of loss of meaning or that other people don't understand the experiences we had. Dr. Morganstein gives 3 easy tips for adjusting to life back at home. 1. Give yourself time and space. 2. Talk to your loved ones about what's going on. 3. Give your loved ones time and space ...

Video
Aug 22, 2023

3 Easy Tips for Hard Conversations - Part 1

3 Easy Tips for Hard Conversations  - Part 1

Is a friend having a tough time? Do you want to talk to them and don't know how? Dr. Joshua Morganstein gives 3 tips on how to talk to a friend or colleague who you think might be having a hard time. 1. Set the stage for a conversation - find a time when you both have the time and aren't rushed 2. Find the words 3. Follow-up This is the first ...

Video
Aug 22, 2023

3 Easy Tips for Hard Conversations - Part 3

3 Easy Tips for Hard Conversations - Part 3

Part 3 - Follow Up Is a friend having a tough time? Do you want to talk to them and don't know how? Dr. Joshua Morganstein gives 3 tips on how to talk to a friend or colleague who you think might be having a hard time. 1. Set the stage for a conversation 2. Find the words 3. Follow-up This is the third video in a series that gives advice on ...

Video
Aug 22, 2023

3 Easy Tips for Hard Conversations - Part 2

3 Easy Tips for Hard Conversations - Part 2

Part 2 - Find the Words Is a friend having a tough time? Do you want to talk to them and don't know how? Dr. Joshua Morganstein gives 3 tips on how to talk to a friend or colleague who you think might be having a hard time. 1. Set the stage for a conversation 2. Find the words 3. Follow-up This is the second video in a series that gives ...

Article
May 31, 2023

Confidential Mental Health Resources Available to Military Families

U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Christian Luna Salvador, right, a postal clerk with Headquarters and Support Battalion, Marine Corps Installations Pacific, speaks to Tarra Brannon, a social worker with Marine Corps Community Services Okinawa, in a family evacuation drill during Exercise Constant Vigilance 2022 on Camp Foster, Okinawa, Japan, on Oct. 20, 2022. The Military Health System offers many services to service members in a variety of settings in times of stress and anxiety. (credit: U.S. Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Thomas Sheng)

“Checking in on your mental health can be as easy as making an appointment with a mental health professional, such as a therapist or psychiatrist – and that can be done face to face or virtually,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Anna Fedotova, mental health flight commander, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.

Article Around MHS
May 26, 2023

Walter Reed Expert Shares Five Ways to Prioritize Mental Health

Dr. Diaz discusses the importance of mental fitness with U.S. Army Pvt. 2 Kaliyah Rowan at the Mental Fitness Information table during Staff Resiliency Week at Walter Reed. Diaz says prioritizing mental health is key to building resilience, and shared five ways staff members can do just that in honor of Mental Health Awareness Month. (Photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Jesse Sharpe, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center)

In today's fast-paced health care environment, it's more important than ever to prioritize mental health to build resilience, and in honor of National Mental Health Awareness Month and Staff Resiliency Week at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Dr. Kristine Diaz, a personnel psychologist, shares five ways staff members can prioritize their ...

Article Around MHS
May 22, 2023

New Mental Health Care Initiative Improves Access to Care and Readiness

A room plaque for the 341st Operational Medical Readiness Squadron mental health flight is pictured inside the base clinic June 23, 2021, at Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana. The mental health flight offers mental health services to active duty members and manages the Family Advocacy and Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment programs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Heather Heiney)

For more than a year, the Air Force Medical Service has been rolling out Mental Health Targeted Care, an initiative that helps Airmen and Guardians understand all of the available options for support and connects them to the right resource either in a mental health clinic or outside the military hospital with another supporting agency that best meets ...

Fact Sheet
May 22, 2023

Changes in Behavior, Personality or Mood Following Concussion/mTBI Fact Sheet

.PDF | 977.73 KB

This TBICoE fact sheet can be used by health care providers to educate patients with a concussion, or mild TBI, on how to manage changes in mood related to their injury. Patients and caregivers would also find this information useful.

Skip subpage navigation
Refine your search
Last Updated: September 28, 2023
Follow us on Instagram Follow us on LinkedIn Follow us on Facebook Follow us on X Follow us on YouTube Sign up on GovDelivery