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MHS Reaches 6 Million Doses of Vaccine Against COVID

Image of Airmen of the 139th Airlift Wing, Missouri Air National Guard, receive COVID-19 immunizations as a part of the federal mandate at Rosecrans Air National Guard Base, St. Joseph, Missouri, Oct. 2, 2021. The 139th Medical Group oversees the operation. . An airmen receives a COVID-19 immunizations as a part of the federal mandate at Rosecrans Air National Guard Base, St. Joseph, Missouri, Oct. 2, 2021. The 139th Medical Group oversees the operation.

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The Military Health System has administered more than 6.1 million doses of vaccines against the virus that causes COVID-19.

The milestone comes as MHS service members and beneficiaries have either received all shots necessary for immunization against SARS-CoV-2 or who have had at least one shot of a two-dose regimen of Pfizer-BioNTech's vaccine (labeled as that or as the brand name Comirnaty), the Moderna two-dose vaccine, or one dose as required for the Johnson & Johnson/Janssen vaccine.

Vaccinations have been ongoing in the MHS since mid-December.

On Aug. 24, Secretary of Defense Lloyd J. Austin III mandated that all service members, including Guard and Reserves, be vaccinated against COVID-19.

Pentagon spokesperson John Kirby said Nov. 1 that "as of today, 97% of the active-duty force has had at least one dose. This would include 99% of active-duty sailors, and with active airmen closely behind it, around 97%, and the Marine Corps is at 93% with one dose, and the Army also is in the 90th percentile."

"So, just in terms of first dosage, there's been a lot more progress, and we continue to see the men and women of the force doing the right thing, which is getting vaccinated."

Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs Dr. Terry Adirim said of this milestone: "We are proud that our service members and beneficiaries have taken the opportunity to protect themselves against COVID-19. This is an important step for maintaining operational readiness and making the military community safer for our service members and their families."

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Last Updated: February 09, 2022

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