Skip main navigation

Military Health System

Clear Your Browser Cache

This website has recently undergone changes. Users finding unexpected concerns may care to clear their browser's cache to ensure a seamless experience.

DHA Leads NATO's Historical Medical Interoperability Exercise

Image of Officers watch a presentation in a room. Representatives from NATO Nations Test IT Solutions during CWIX 22 to Achieve Day Zero Interoperability for the Alliance. (Photo: Courtesy of NATO Joint Force Training Center)

Coordination between NATO allies is vitally important to maintain the mutually -supporting alliance. This remains ever more important with the continued conflict in Ukraine.

Last month, NATO conducted its annual Coalition Warrior Interoperability eXploration, eXperimentation, eXamination, eXercise 2022, or CWIX 22. This interoperability exercise provides a controlled environment for NATO and partner nations to design, build, and test interoperability into command and control capabilities.

This year Poland hosted the event at the Joint Force Training Center (JFTC) in Bydgoszcz, Poland.

During the exercise U.S. Defense Health Agency leaders engaged with representatives from Belgium, Finland, the Netherlands, and Poland to execute the CWIX medical focus area from the JFTC and several virtual locations. Their goal was to test OpenAHLTA and other novel technologies to enhance patient tracking, commander decision-making, and secure electronic transmission of health treatment records through the continuum of care and back to a patient’s home nation.

“Day-zero, multi-national interoperability among allied and partner Nations is essential for enhanced care of warfighters, decision support on the battlefield, and response to disasters and other medical threats,” explained Mark Goodge, chair of the NATO Committee of the Chiefs of Military Medical Services (COMEDS) Health Information Systems & Technology Working Group (HIST-WG).

DHA representatives led the medical exercise by testing OpenAHLTA with other technology, such as the NATO First Responder App to monitor patient vitals, direct patient flow, optimize patient care and resources, inform the common operating picture, and transmit electronic health records through the roles of care. Additionally, the DHA team tested the Theater Operational Medicine Advanced Hardened Warfare Kit (TOMAHAWK) or “Hospital in a Box”, a powerful server that can be easily deployed to support field medical treatment facilities.

“We are proud to leverage OpenAHLTA with other technologies, such as TOMAHAWK, to bring NATO and Partner Nations one step closer to the secure, real-time, electronic exchange of patient information from point of injury back to a soldier’s home nation,” Goodge stated. “Providing better information, faster, to the right decision makers saves lives and prepares the alliance for day zero interoperability.”

You also may be interested in...

Article Around MHS
Jan 2, 2024

Pacific Partnership 24-1 Spotlights Global Health

The hospital ship USNS Mercy (T-AH 19) arrives in Koror, Palau during Pacific Partnership 2024-1 Dec. 21, 2023. (Photo By Chief Petty Officer Shamira Purifoy)

Pacific Partnership 24-1 concludes 10 days of medical, humanitarian, and disaster response, collaborating with professionals and U.S. veterans. The mission concluded at its third mission stop on Dec. 21, 2023 in Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia.

Article Around MHS
Nov 16, 2023

Military Tropical Medicine Course Resumes International Field Missions

Military tropical medicine students on board a Brazilian medical ship as part of the courses field rotations. Pictured above are U.S. Navy Lt. Aviv Fraiman, U.S. Navy Lt. Kylie Wilson, U.S. Navy Lt. Louise Gaunt, U.S. Navy Lt. Cmdr. Cyrus Haselby, and U.S. Navy Capt. Ben Norton. (Photo by Military Tropical Medicine Course)

Two years after its inaugural 1993 class, the Navy’s Military Tropical Medicine program took on a tri-service mission, with a hallmark structure of four weeks of in-person didactic followed by two weeks in tropical infectious disease endemic locations. In 2020, the course momentarily halted international rotations due to travel restrictions and ...

Article Around MHS
Nov 9, 2023

Behind the Scenes of Military Medicine

U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kendra Ward, 6th Medical Support Squadron X-ray and CT scan technologist, works with Dr. Paul Velt, assigned to the 6th MDSS at MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, Sept. 2023. Ward has been recognized for providing radiologic imaging for 265,000 beneficiaries, managing a $3.5 million archival system for eight telehealth sites across the Department of Defense, all while training students to operate a $2 million computed tomography machine. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

Charged with providing radiologic imaging for 265,000 beneficiaries, managing a $3.5 million archival system for eight telehealth sites across the Department of Defense, all while training students to operate a $2 million computed tomography machine, U.S. Air Force Senior Airman Kendra Ward is no stranger to the fast-paced world of military health care.

Skip subpage navigation
Refine your search
Last Updated: July 31, 2023
Follow us on Instagram Follow us on LinkedIn Follow us on Facebook Follow us on X Follow us on YouTube Sign up on GovDelivery